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  1.  11
    Why caregivers have no autonomy‐based reason to respect advance directives in dementia care.Sigurd Lauridsen, Anna P. Folker & Martin M. Andersen - 2023 - Bioethics 37 (4):399-405.
    Advance directives (ADs) have for some time been championed by ethicists and patient associations alike as a tool that people newly diagnosed with dementia, or prior to onset, may use to ensure that their future care and treatment are organized in accordance with their interests. The idea is that autonomous people, not yet neurologically affected by dementia, can design directives for their future care that caregivers are morally obligated to respect because they have been designed by autonomous individuals. In this (...)
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  2.  72
    Legitimate allocation of public healthcare: Beyond accountability for reasonableness.Sigurd Lauridsen & Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (1):59-69.
    PhD, Institute of Public Health, Unit of Medical Philosophy and Clinical Theory, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, P.O. Box 2099 1014 Copenhagen. Tel: +45 30 32 33 63; Email: s.lauridsen{at}pubhealth.ku.dk ' + u + '@ ' + d + ' '/ /- ->Citizens’ consent to political decisions is often regarded as a necessary condition of political legitimacy. Consequently, legitimate allocation of healthcare has seemed almost unattainable in contemporary pluralistic societies. The problem is that citizens do not agree on any (...)
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  3.  40
    Administrative gatekeeping – a third way between unrestricted patient advocacy and bedside rationing.Sigurd Lauridsen - 2008 - Bioethics 23 (5):311-320.
    The inevitable need for rationing of healthcare has apparently presented the medical profession with the dilemma of choosing the lesser of two evils. Physicians appear to be obliged to adopt either an implausible version of traditional professional ethics or an equally problematic ethics of bedside rationing. The former requires unrestricted advocacy of patients but prompts distrust, moral hazard and unfairness. The latter commits physicians to rationing at the bedside; but it is bound to introduce unfair inequalities among patients and lack (...)
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  4.  12
    Developing the CARE intervention to enhance ethical self-efficacy in dementia care through the use of literary texts.Sofie Smedegaard Skov, Marie-Elisabeth Phil, Peter Simonsen, Anna Paldam Folker, Frederik Schou-Juul & Sigurd Lauridsen - 2023 - BMC Medical Ethics 24 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundDementia care is essential to promote the well-being of patients but remains a difficult task prone to ethical issues. These issues include questions like whether manipulating a person with dementia is ethically permissible if it promotes her best interest or how to engage with a person who is unwilling to recognize that she has dementia. To help people living with dementia and their carers manage ethical issues in dementia care, we developed the CARE intervention. This is an intervention focused on (...)
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  5.  16
    Emergency care, triage, and fairness.Sigurd Lauridsen - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (5):450-458.
    Triage is a widespread principle for prioritizing patients in emergency departments. The purpose of triage is to ensure that in emergency situations, whenever medical demand exceeds medical supply, limited resources should be directed to the case with the greatest clinical need. Triage fulfills this purpose by ranking patients according to how acute their condition is and then giving priority to the most acute ones. In this paper, I argue that this current practice of triage needs to be supplemented. Contemporary triage (...)
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  6.  20
    ESPMH News.Sigurd Lauridsen - 2007 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (2):353.
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  7.  63
    Justice and the allocation of healthcare resources: should indirect, non-health effects count? [REVIEW]Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen & Sigurd Lauridsen - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):237-246.
    Alternative allocations of a fixed bundle of healthcare resources often involve significantly different indirect, non-health effects. The question arises whether these effects must figure in accounts of the conditions under which a distribution of healthcare resources is morally justifiable. In this article we defend a Scanlonian, affirmative answer to this question: healthcare resource managers should sometimes select an allocation which has worse direct, health-related effects but better indirect, nonhealth effects; they should do this when the interests served by such a (...)
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