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  1.  16
    The Ethics of ‘Public Understanding of Ethics’—Why and How Bioethics Expertise Should Include Public and Patients’ Voices.Silke Schicktanz, Mark Schweda & Brian Wynne - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (2):129-139.
    “Ethics” is used as a label for a new kind of expertise in the field of science and technology. At the same time, it is not clear what ethical expertise consists in and what its political status in modern democracies can be. Starting from the “participatory turn” in recent social research and policy, we will argue that bioethical reasoning has to include public views of and attitudes towards biomedicine. We will sketch the outlines of a bioethical conception of “public understanding (...)
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  2.  3
    Patient Representation: Mind the Gap Between Individual and Collective Claims.Karin R. Jongsma & Silke Schicktanz - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (4):28-30.
    Volume 20, Issue 4, May 2020, Page 28-30.
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  3.  32
    Research Across the Disciplines: A Road Map for Quality Criteria in Empirical Ethics Research.Marcel Mertz, Julia Inthorn, Günter Renz, Lillian Geza Rothenberger, Sabine Salloch, Jan Schildmann, Sabine Wöhlke & Silke Schicktanz - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):17.
    Research in the field of Empirical Ethics (EE) uses a broad variety of empirical methodologies, such as surveys, interviews and observation, developed in disciplines such as sociology, anthropology, and psychology. Whereas these empirical disciplines see themselves as purely descriptive, EE also aims at normative reflection. Currently there is literature about the quality of empirical research in ethics, but little or no reflection on specific methodological aspects that must be considered when conducting interdisciplinary empirical ethics. Furthermore, poor methodology in an EE (...)
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  4.  13
    Understanding Collective Agency in Bioethics.Katharina Beier, Isabella Jordan, Claudia Wiesemann & Silke Schicktanz - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (3):411-422.
    Bioethicists tend to focus on the individual as the relevant moral subject. Yet, in highly complex and socially differentiated healthcare systems a number of social groups, each committed to a common cause, are involved in medical decisions and sometimes even try to influence bioethical discourses according to their own agenda. We argue that the significance of these collective actors is unjustifiably neglected in bioethics. The growing influence of collective actors in the fields of biopolitics and bioethics leads us to pursue (...)
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  5.  17
    ‘In a Completely Different Light’? The Role of ‘Being Affected’ for the Epistemic Perspectives and Moral Attitudes of Patients, Relatives and Lay People.Silke Schicktanz, Mark Schweda & Martina Franzen - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):57-72.
    In this paper, we explore and discuss the use of the concept of being affected in biomedical decision making processes in Germany. The corresponding German term ‘Betroffenheit’ characterizes on the one hand a relation between a state of affairs and a person and on the other an emotional reaction that involves feelings like concern and empathy with the suffering of others. An example for the increasing relevance of being affected is the postulation of the participation of people with disabilities and (...)
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  6.  4
    One For All, All For One? Collective Representation in Healthcare Policy.Karin Jongsma, Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty, Aviad Raz & Silke Schicktanz - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):337-340.
    Healthcare collectives, such as patient organizations, advocacy groups, disability organizations, professional associations, industry advocates, social movements, and health consumer organizations have been increasingly involved in healthcare policymaking. Such collectives are based on the idea that individual interests can be aggregated into collective interests by participation, deliberation, and representation. The topic of collectivity in healthcare, more specifically collective representation, has only rarely been addressed in bioethics. This symposium, entitled: “Collective Representation in Healthcare Policy” of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry draws attention (...)
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  7.  62
    What German Experts Expect From Individualized Medicine: Problems of Uncertainty and Future Complication in Physician–Patient Interaction.Arndt Heßling & Silke Schicktanz - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (2):86-93.
    ‘Individualized medicine’ is an emerging paradigm in clinical life science research. We conducted a socio-empirical interview study in a leading German clinical research group, aiming at implementing ‘individualized medicine’ of colorectal cancer. The goal was to investigate moral and social issues related to physician–patient interaction and clinical care, and to identify the points raised, supported and rejected by the physicians and researchers. Up to now there has been only limited insight into how experts dedicated to individualized medicine view its problems. (...)
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  8.  51
    Erratum To: The Ethics of 'Public Understanding of Ethics'—Why and How Bioethics Expertise Should Include Public and Patients' Voices.Silke Schicktanz, Mark Schweda & Brian Wynne - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (2):251-251.
    “Ethics” is used as a label for a new kind of expertise in the field of science and technology. At the same time, it is not clear what ethical expertise consists in and what its political status in modern democracies can be. Starting from the “participatory turn” in recent social research and policy, we will argue that bioethical reasoning has to include public views of and attitudes towards biomedicine. We will sketch the outlines of a bioethical conception of “public understanding (...)
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  9.  8
    Patient Representation and Advocacy for Alzheimer Disease in Germany and Israel.Silke Schicktanz, Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty, Aviad Raz & Karin Jongsma - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):369-380.
    This paper analyses self-declared aims and representation of dementia patient organizations and advocacy groups in relation to two recent upheavals: the critique of social stigmatization and biomedical research focusing on prediction. Based on twenty-six semi-structured interviews conducted in 2016–2017 with members, service recipients, and board representatives of POs in Germany and Israel, a comparative analysis was conducted, based on a grounded theory approach, to detect emerging topics within and across the POs and across national contexts. We identified a heterogeneous landscape, (...)
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  10.  34
    Exploring the Positions of German and Israeli Patient Organizations in the Bioethical Context of End-of-Life Policies.Aviad Raz, Isabella Jordan & Silke Schicktanz - 2014 - Health Care Analysis 22 (2):143-159.
    Patient organizations are increasingly involved in national and international bioethical debates and health policy deliberations. In order to examine how and to what extent cultural factors and organizational contexts influence the positions of patient organizations, this study compares the positions of German and Israeli patient organizations (POs) on issues related to end-of-life medical care. We draw on a qualitative pilot study of thirteen POs, using as a unit of analysis pairs comprised of one German PO and one Israeli PO that (...)
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  11.  31
    Zum Stellenwert von Betroffenheit, Öffentlichkeit und Deliberation im empirical turn der Medizinethik.Silke Schicktanz - 2009 - Ethik in der Medizin 21 (3):223-234.
    Für die Medizinethik liegt ein großes Potential sozialempirischer Forschung in der Erhöhung der Kontextsensitivität, dem Sichtbarmachen von sozialen und institutionellen Rollen und dem Einbringen von Stimmen, die bislang zu wenig gehört worden sind. Diese Möglichkeiten bergen jedoch auch das Risiko, dass Deliberation und Argumentation durch Umfragen und Meinungserhebungen ersetzt werden. Der in den Sozialwissenschaften einsetzende participatory turn gibt Anlass, Anliegen und Methoden klassischer sozialempirischer Vorgehensweisen aus normativer Sicht zu hinterfragen. Eine Auseinandersetzung mit Konzeptionen von Betroffenheit, Öffentlichkeit und Expertise ist nicht (...)
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  12.  21
    “What the Patient Wants…”: Lay Attitudes Towards End-of-Life Decisions in Germany and Israel.Julia Inthorn, Silke Schicktanz, Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty & Aviad Raz - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (3):329-340.
    National legislation, as well as arguments of experts, in Germany and Israel represent opposite regulatory approaches and positions in bioethical debates concerning end-of-life care. This study analyzes how these positions are mirrored in the attitudes of laypeople and influenced by the religious views and personal experiences of those affected. We qualitatively analyzed eight focus groups in Germany and Israel in which laypeople were asked to discuss similar scenarios involving the withholding or withdrawing of treatment, physician-assisted suicide, and euthanasia. In both (...)
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  13.  23
    Diversity and Uniformity in Genetic Responsibility: Moral Attitudes of Patients, Relatives and Lay People in Germany and Israel. [REVIEW]Aviad E. Raz & Silke Schicktanz - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):433-442.
    The professional and institutional responsibility for handling genetic knowledge is well discussed; less attention has been paid to how lay people and particularly people who are affected by genetic diseases perceive and frame such responsibilities. In this exploratory study we qualitatively examine the attitudes of lay people, patients and relatives of patients in Germany and Israel towards genetic testing. These attitudes are further examined in the national context of Germany and Israel, which represent opposite regulatory approaches and bioethical debates concerning (...)
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  14.  24
    The Cultural Context of Patient’s Autonomy and Doctor’s Duty: Passive Euthanasia and Advance Directives in Germany and Israel. [REVIEW]Silke Schicktanz, Aviad Raz & Carmel Shalev - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):363-369.
    The moral discourse surrounding end-of-life (EoL) decisions is highly complex, and a comparison of Germany and Israel can highlight the impact of cultural factors. The comparison shows interesting differences in how patient’s autonomy and doctor’s duties are morally and legally related to each other with respect to the withholding and withdrawing of medical treatment in EoL situations. Taking the statements of two national expert ethics committees on EoL in Israel and Germany (and their legal outcome) as an example of this (...)
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  15.  48
    The Diversity of Responsibility: The Value of Explication and Pluralization.Silke Schicktanz & Mark Schweda - 2012 - Medicine Studies 3 (3):131-145.
    PurposeAlthough the term “responsibility” plays a central role in bioethics and public health, its meaning and implications are often unclear. This paper defends the importance of a more systematic conception of responsibility to improve moral philosophical as well as descriptive analysis.MethodsWe start with a formal analysis of the relational conception of responsibility and its meta-ethical presuppositions. In a brief historical overview, we compare global-collective, professional, personal, and social responsibility. The value of our analytical matrix is illustrated by sorting out the (...)
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  16.  49
    Public Moralities Concerning Donation and Disposition of Organs: Results From a Cross-European Study.Mark Schweda & Silke Schicktanz - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (3):308-317.
    There are not many international consensuses in the governance of biomedicine. One that exists concerns a general reluctance toward a commercialization of organ procurement. However, with reference to the problem of there is an increasingly louder call in ethical and legal discourse to and to establish a debate on financial incentives Other ethicists and jurists criticize this development, and warn of injustice, exploitation of the poor, and a commodification of the human body.
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  17.  30
    Epistemic Injustice in Dementia and Autism Patient Organizations: An Empirical Analysis.Karin Jongsma, Elisabeth Spaeth & Silke Schicktanz - 2017 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 8 (4):221-233.
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  18.  77
    The Cultural Context of End-of-Life Ethics: A Comparison of Germany and Israel.Silke Schicktanz, Aviad Raz & Carmel Shalev - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (3):381-394.
    End-of-life decisions concerning euthanasia, stopping life-support machines, or handling advance directives are very complex and highly disputed in industrialized, democratic countries. A main controversy is how to balance the patient’s autonomy and right to self-determination with the doctor’s duty to save life and the value of life as such. These EoL dilemmas are closely linked to legal, medical, religious, and bioethical discourses. In this paper, we examine and deconstruct these linkages in Germany and Israel, moving beyond one-dimensional constructions of ethical (...)
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  19.  7
    The Relevance of Affected Persons, the Public, and Deliberation for the Empirical Turn in Medical Ethics.Silke Schicktanz - 2009 - Ethik in der Medizin 21 (3):223-234.
    ZusammenfassungFür die Medizinethik liegt ein großes Potential sozialempirischer Forschung in der Erhöhung der Kontextsensitivität, dem Sichtbarmachen von sozialen und institutionellen Rollen und dem Einbringen von Stimmen, die bislang zu wenig gehört worden sind. Diese Möglichkeiten bergen jedoch auch das Risiko, dass Deliberation und Argumentation durch Umfragen und Meinungserhebungen ersetzt werden. Der in den Sozialwissenschaften einsetzende participatory turn gibt Anlass, Anliegen und Methoden klassischer sozialempirischer Vorgehensweisen aus normativer Sicht zu hinterfragen. Eine Auseinandersetzung mit Konzeptionen von Betroffenheit, Öffentlichkeit und Expertise ist nicht (...)
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  20.  6
    Beyond Cultural Stereotyping: Views on End-of-Life Decision Making Among Religious and Secular Persons in the USA, Germany, and Israel.Mark Schweda, Silke Schicktanz, Aviad Raz & Anita Silvers - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):13.
    End-of-life decision making constitutes a major challenge for bioethical deliberation and political governance in modern democracies: On the one hand, it touches upon fundamental convictions about life, death, and the human condition. On the other, it is deeply rooted in religious traditions and historical experiences and thus shows great socio-cultural diversity. The bioethical discussion of such cultural issues oscillates between liberal individualism and cultural stereotyping. Our paper confronts the bioethical expert discourse with public moral attitudes. The paper is based on (...)
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  21. The "Spare Parts Person"? Conceptions of the Human Body and Their Implications for Public Attitudes Towards Organ Donation and Organ Sale.Mark Schweda & Silke Schicktanz - 2009 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 4:4-.
    BackgroundThe increasing debate on financial incentives for organ donation raises concerns about a "commodification of the human body". Philosophical-ethical stances on this development depend on assumptions concerning the body and how people think about it. In our qualitative empirical study we analyze public attitudes towards organ donation in their specific relation to conceptions of the human body in four European countries (Cyprus, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden). This approach aims at a more context-sensitive picture of what "commodification of the body" (...)
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  22.  4
    Möglichkeiten und Grenzen von Ethikberatung im Rahmen der COVID-19-Pandemie.Georg Marckmann, Gerald Neitzke, Annette Riedel, Silke Schicktanz, Jan Schildmann, Alfred Simon, Ralf Stoecker, Jochen Vollmann, Eva Winkler & Christin Zang - 2020 - Ethik in der Medizin 32 (2):195-199.
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  23.  11
    Medicine, Market and Communication: Ethical Considerations in Regard to Persuasive Communication in Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing Services.Manuel Schaper & Silke Schicktanz - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):56.
    Commercial genetic testing offered over the internet, known as direct-to-consumer genetic testing, currently is under ethical attack. A common critique aims at the limited validation of the tests as well as the risk of psycho-social stress or adaption of incorrect behavior by users triggered by misleading health information. Here, we examine in detail the specific role of advertising communication of DTC GT companies from a medical ethical perspective. Our argumentative analysis departs from the starting point that DTC GT operates at (...)
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  24.  15
    “I Would Rather Have It Done by a Doctor”—Laypeople’s Perceptions of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing (DTC GT) and its Ethical Implications.Manuel Schaper, Sabine Wöhlke & Silke Schicktanz - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (1):31-40.
    Direct-to-consumer genetic testing has been available for several years now, with varying degrees of regulation across different countries. Despite a restrictive legal framework it is possible for consumers to order genetic tests from companies located in other countries. However, German laypeople’s awareness and perceptions of DTC GT services is still unexplored. We conducted seven focus groups with German laypeople to explore their perceptions of and attitudes towards commercial genetic testing and its ethical implications. Participants were critical towards DTC GT. Criticism (...)
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  25.  11
    Failed Surrogate Conceptions: Social and Ethical Aspects of Preconception Disruptions During Commercial Surrogacy in India.Sayani Mitra & Silke Schicktanz - 2016 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11:9.
    BackgroundDuring a commercial surrogacy arrangement, the event of embryo transfer can be seen as the formal starting point of the arrangement. However, it is common for surrogates to undergo a failed attempt at pregnancy conception or missed conception after an embryo transfer. This paper attempts to argue that such failed attempts can be understood as a loss. It aims to reconstruct the experiences of loss and grief of the surrogates and the intended parents as a consequence of their collective failure (...)
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  26.  62
    Medizinethik und Empirie – Standortbestimmungen eines spannungsreichen Verhältnisses.Silke Schicktanz & Jan Schildmann - 2009 - Ethik in der Medizin 21 (3):183-186.
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  27.  2
    Physicians’ Communication Patterns for Motivating Rectal Cancer Patients to Biomarker Research: Empirical Insights and Ethical Issues.Sabine Wöhlke, Julia Perry & Silke Schicktanz - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (4):175-188.
    In clinical research – whether pharmaceutical, genetic or biomarker research – it is important to protect research participants’ autonomy and to ensure or strengthen their control over health-related decisions. Empirical–ethical studies have argued that both the ethical concept and the current legalistic practice of informed consent should be adapted to the complexity of the clinical environment. For this, a better understanding of recruitment, for which also the physician–patient relationship plays an important role, is needed.Our aim is to ethically reflect communication (...)
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  28.  25
    The Concept of “Genetic Responsibility” and Its Meanings: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Medical Sociology Literature.Jon Leefmann, Manuel Schaper & Silke Schicktanz - 2017 - Frontiers in Sociology 18 (1):1-22.
    The acquisition of genetic information (GI) confronts both the affected individuals and healthcare providers with difficult, ambivalent decisions. Genetic responsibility (GR) has become a key concept in both ethical and socioempirical literature addressing how and by whom decision-making with respect to the morality of GI is approached. However, despite its prominence, the precise meaning of the concept of GR remains vague. Therefore, we conducted a systematic literature review on the usage of the concept of GR in qualitative, socioempirical studies, to (...)
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  29.  3
    Addressing Ethical Challenges of Disclosure in Dementia Prediction: Limitations of Current Guidelines and Suggestions to Proceed.Zümrüt Alpinar-Sencan & Silke Schicktanz - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundBiomarker research is gaining increasing attention focusing on the preclinical stages of the disease. Such interest requires special attention for communication and disclosure in clinical contexts. Many countries give dementia a high health policy priority by developing national strategies and by improving guidelines addressing disclosure of a diagnosis; however, risk communication is often neglected.Main textThis paper aims to identify the challenges of disclosure in the context of dementia prediction and to find out whether existing clinical guidelines sufficiently address the issues (...)
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  30.  79
    Ethical Considerations of the Human–Animal-Relationship Under Conditions of Asymmetry and Ambivalence.Silke Schicktanz - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (1):7-16.
    Ethical reflection deals not only with the moral standing and handling of animals, it should also include a critical analysis of the underlying relationship. Anthropological, psychological, and sociological aspects of the human–animal-relationship should be taken into account. Two conditions, asymmetry and ambivalence, are taken as the historical and empirical basis for reflections on the human–animal-relationship in late modern societies. These conditions explain the variety of moral practice, apart from paradoxes, and provide a framework to systematize animal ethical problems in a (...)
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  31.  32
    Wenn es persönlich wird in der „personalisierten Medizin“: Aufklärung und Kommunikation aus klinischer Forscher- und Patientenperspektive im empirisch-ethischen VergleichWhen it gets personal in “personalised medicine”: clinical researchers’ and patients’ perspectives on counseling and communication in an empirical–ethical comparison.Sabine Wöhlke, Arndt Heßling & Silke Schicktanz - 2013 - Ethik in der Medizin 25 (3):215-222.
    ZusammenfassungDas Paradigma einer „personalisierten Medizin“ in der klinischen Forschung und Praxis wirft verschiedene Fragen nach Notwendigkeit, Erwartung, Chancen und Risiken auf. In einer laufenden empirisch-ethischen Studie untersuchen wir klinische Forscher- und Patientenperspektiven hinsichtlich des zukünftigen Einsatzes „personalisierter Medizin“ beim Rektumkarzinom. Ziel der Studie ist es, mittels Interviews mit Ärzten/forschern und Patienten und teilnehmender Beobachtung bei Arzt-Patient-Gesprächen ethisch relevante Aspekte der Erforschung und Behandlung im Kontext „personalisierter Medizin“ zu explorieren. Die Analyse von Unterschieden und Gemeinsamkeiten zwischen den Gruppierungen dient der Detektion (...)
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  32.  22
    Why Public Moralities Matter—The Relevance of Socioempirical Premises for the Ethical Debate on Organ Markets.Mark Schweda & Silke Schicktanz - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (3):217-222.
    The ongoing bioethical debate about organ markets rests not only on theoretical premises, but also on assumptions regarding public views of and attitudes toward organ donation that need closer socioempirical examination. Summarizing results from our previous qualitative social research in this field, this paper illustrates the ethical significance of such public moralities in two respects: On one hand, it analyzes the implicit bias of the common rhetoric of “organ scarcity” which motivates much of the commercialization debate. On the other hand, (...)
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  33. The Diversity of Responsibility: The Value of Explication and Pluralization.Silke Schicktanz & Mark Schweda - 2012 - Medicine Studies 3 (3):131-145.
    PurposeAlthough the term “responsibility” plays a central role in bioethics and public health, its meaning and implications are often unclear. This paper defends the importance of a more systematic conception of responsibility to improve moral philosophical as well as descriptive analysis.MethodsWe start with a formal analysis of the relational conception of responsibility and its meta-ethical presuppositions. In a brief historical overview, we compare global-collective, professional, personal, and social responsibility. The value of our analytical matrix is illustrated by sorting out the (...)
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  34.  19
    Impact of Gender and Professional Education on Attitudes Towards Financial Incentives for Organ Donation: Results of a Survey Among 755 Students of Medicine and Economics in Germany.Julia Inthorn, Sabine Wöhlke, Fabian Schmidt & Silke Schicktanz - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):56.
    There is an ongoing expert debate with regard to financial incentives in order to increase organ supply. However, there is a lacuna of empirical studies on whether citizens would actually support financial incentives for organ donation.
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  35.  48
    Interpreting Advance Directives: Ethical Considerations of the Interplay Between Personal and Cultural Identity. [REVIEW]Silke Schicktanz - 2009 - Health Care Analysis 17 (2):158-171.
    In many industrialized countries ethicists and lawyers favour advance directives as a tool to guarantee patient autonomy in end-of-life-decisions. However, most citizens seem reluctant to adopt the practice; the number of patients who have an advance directive is low across most countries. The article discusses the key argument for seeing such documents as an instrument of self-interpretation and life-planning, which ultimately have to be interpreted by third parties as well. Interpretation by third parties and the process of self-reflection are conceptually (...)
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  36.  35
    Why the Way We Consider the Body Matters – Reflections on Four Bioethical Perspectives on the Human Body.Silke Schicktanz - 2007 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2:30.
    Within the context of applied bioethical reasoning, various conceptions of the human body are focused upon by the author in relation to normative notions of autonomy.
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  37.  13
    Public Knowledge and Attitudes Towards Consent Policies for Organ Donation in Europe. A Systematic Review.Alberto Molina Pérez, David Rodríguez-Arias, Janet Delgado-Rodríguez, Myfanwy Morgan, Mihaela Frunza, Gurch Randhawa, Jeantine Reiger-Van de Wijdeven, Eline Schiks, Sabine Wöhlke & Silke Schicktanz - 2019 - Transplantation Reviews 33 (1):1-8.
    Background: Several countries have recently changed their model of consent for organ donation from opt-in to opt-out. We undertook a systematic review to determine public knowledge and attitudes towards these models in Europe. Methods: Six databases were explored between 1 January 2008 and 15 December 2017. We selected empirical studies addressing either knowledge or attitudes towards the systems of consent for deceased organ donation by lay people in Europe, including students. Study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment were conducted by (...)
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  38.  17
    Epistemische Gerechtigkeit. Sozialempirie und Perspektivenpluralismus in der Angewandten Ethik.Silke Schicktanz - 2012 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 60 (2):269-283.
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  39.  23
    Nachdenken im Kinosessel? Bioethische Reflexion durch Filme als eine neue Möglichkeit der Diskussion von Standpunkten und Betroffenheit.Sabine Wöhlke, Solveig Lena Hansen & Silke Schicktanz - 2015 - Ethik in der Medizin 27 (1):1-8.
    ZusammenfassungIm Spielfilm Never Let Me Go werden Klone als vulnerable und heteronome Individuen dargestellt, die zur anonymen Organspende gezwungen werden. In diesem Beitrag wird die Darstellung dieser Figuren in ihrer individuellen Entwicklung und gesellschaftlichen Sozialisation unter der Frage untersucht, welche Bezüge sich zu bioethischen Aspekten ergeben. Die Klone befinden sich in einer Situation der „privilegierten Deprivation“: Aus Sicht der Zuschauer sind sie sozial benachteiligt und können sich nicht zu komplett autonomen Wesen entwickeln, aber aus ihrer eigenen Perspektive sind sie im (...)
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  40.  10
    Kollektivität im Gesundheitswesen: Ethische Theorien und Praxisfelder von Gruppen als Akteuren: Anlässlich der Jahrestagung der Akademie für Ethik in der Medizin 2019 in Göttingen.Silke Schicktanz - 2019 - Ethik in der Medizin 31 (2):109-111.
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  41.  16
    Überreden Für Die Gute Sache? Techniken Öffentlicher Gesundheitskommunikation Und Ihre Ethischen ImplikationenConvincing for the Good Cause? Techniques of Public Health Communication and Their Ethical Implications.Manuel Schaper, Solveig Lena Hansen & Silke Schicktanz - 2019 - Ethik in der Medizin 31 (1):23-44.
    ZusammenfassungDer Beitrag analysiert Techniken öffentlicher Gesundheitskommunikation und skizziert im Ausblick Minimalbedingungen für ihre ethische Vertretbarkeit. Dazu wird erstens an einem aktuellen Beispiel veranschaulicht, wie mittels Text und Bild die Öffentlichkeit überzeugt werden soll, ein bestimmtes Gesundheitsverhalten an den Tag zu legen. Zweitens werden anhand der internationalen Ethik-Debatte fünf Grundtypen von Techniken in der Gesundheitskommunikation rekonstruiert und entlang von Mittel, Zweck, Folgen für Adressaten sowie Implikationen für Autonomie aus ethischer Sicht unterschieden. Am besonders ambivalenten Beispiel der Persuasion wird dann drittens diskutiert, (...)
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  42.  5
    Between Self-and External Interpretation: The Mutual Relationship Between Socio-Cultural and Ethical Aspects of Advance Directives.Silke Schicktanz - 2008 - Ethik in der Medizin 20 (3):181-190.
    ZusammenfassungDie enorme Bedeutung, die Patientenverfügungen in der aktuellen ethisch-rechtlichen Diskussion zukommt, steht in gewissem Widerspruch zur geringen öffentlichen Bereitschaft, eine solche abzufassen. Dies wirft die ethische Frage auf, welche Argumente für das Abfassen von Patientenverfügungen sprechen. Zentral sind hierbei strebensethische Aspekte, die auf das Wünschenswerte und Lebenskluge einer solchen Entscheidung abheben. Mit einem um die soziokulturelle Perspektive erweiterten Identitätskonzept lässt sich für die Patientenverfügung als sinnvolles Instrument der Selbst-Deutung und Lebensplanung argumentieren. Zugleich verweist die soziokulturelle Dimension auf neue ethische Probleme (...)
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  43.  18
    Zwischen Selbst-Deutung und Interpretation durch Dritte:: Zum Wechselverhältnis von soziokulturellen und ethischen Aspekten von Patientenverfügungen.Silke Schicktanz - 2008 - Ethik in der Medizin 20 (3):181-190.
    ZusammenfassungDie enorme Bedeutung, die Patientenverfügungen in der aktuellen ethisch-rechtlichen Diskussion zukommt, steht in gewissem Widerspruch zur geringen öffentlichen Bereitschaft, eine solche abzufassen. Dies wirft die ethische Frage auf, welche Argumente für das Abfassen von Patientenverfügungen sprechen. Zentral sind hierbei strebensethische Aspekte, die auf das Wünschenswerte und Lebenskluge einer solchen Entscheidung abheben. Mit einem um die soziokulturelle Perspektive erweiterten Identitätskonzept lässt sich für die Patientenverfügung als sinnvolles Instrument der Selbst-Deutung und Lebensplanung argumentieren. Zugleich verweist die soziokulturelle Dimension auf neue ethische Probleme (...)
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  44.  20
    Medizinethische Probleme der Xenotransplantation.Silke Schicktanz - 2002 - Ethik in der Medizin 14 (4):234-251.
    Definition of the problem: The transplantation of animal tissue and organs (xenotransplantation) is touted as one of the future options for transplantation medicine. This technology implies many unsolved practical and ethical problems. Arguments and conclusion: The article discusses the medico-ethical problems faced by patients, physicians, and the public in clinical trials. The problems involved in weighing chances and risks are classified and discussed. Additionally, parallels between the debate on handling HIV in the 1980 s and xenozoonoses today point to possible (...)
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  45.  22
    Responsibility Revisited.Silke Schicktanz & Aviad Raz - 2012 - Medicine Studies 3 (3):129-130.
    Recent developments in medicine open up new possibilities for planning and shaping life. At the same time, this scope of new options and interventions also involves new forms and spheres of responsibilities. Elderly persons can be viewed as having a responsibility toward their families and partners to plan, via advance health care directives, the final stages of their life; individuals can be seen as responsible for late onset diseases when ignoring public incitements for a healthy life style; and medical professionals (...)
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  46.  7
    Kommentar II zum Fall:„Palliativmedizin im interkulturellen Kontext “.Silke Schicktanz - 2010 - Ethik in der Medizin 22 (1):55-57.
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  47. Medico-Ethical Problems of Xenotransplantation.Silke Schicktanz - 2002 - Ethik in der Medizin 14 (4):234-251.
    Zusammenfassung. Die Verpflanzung tierischer Organe wird als neue Zukunftsoption der Transplantationsmedizin gehandelt. Bei dieser Technik stellen sich zahlreiche ungelöste biomedizinische und ethische Probleme. Der Beitrag diskutiert vorrangig die medizinethischen Probleme für Patienten, Ärzte und Dritte, die sich bei klinischen Versuchen zur Verfügung stellen, und problematisiert die Abwägung der Chancen und Risiken. Zudem zeigen inhaltliche Parallelen zwischen den xenogenen Infektionsrisiken und der HIV-Debatte der 8oer Jahre mögliche Szenarien für den weiteren Debatten-Verlauf auf.
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  48. ""When It Gets Personal in" Personalised Medicine": Clinical Researchers' and Patients' Perspectives on Counseling and Communication in an Empirical-Ethical Comparison.Sabine Woehlke, Arndt Hessling & Silke Schicktanz - 2013 - Ethik in der Medizin 25 (3):215-222.
     
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