Results for 'Simeon Simoff and Many Others'

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  1.  75
    How Are Australian Higher Education Institutions Contributing to Innovative Teaching and Learning Through Virtual Worlds?Brent Gregory, Sue Gregory, Bogdanovych A., Jacobson Michael, Newstead Anne & Simeon Simoff and Many Others - 2011 - In Gregory Sue (ed.), Proceedings of Ascilite 2011 (Australian Society of Computers in Tertiary Education). Ascilite.
    Over the past decade, teaching and learning in virtual worlds has been at the forefront of many higher education institutions around the world. The DEHub Virtual Worlds Working Group (VWWG) consisting of Australian and New Zealand higher education academics was formed in 2009. These educators are investigating the role that virtual worlds play in the future of education and actively changing the direction of their own teaching practice and curricula. 47 academics reporting on 28 Australian higher education institutions present (...)
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  2.  11
    Siméon Rajaona on Western Ways of Thinking and the Authentic Malagasy Mind.Graziella Masindrazana, Zoly Rakotoniera & Casey Woodling - 2018 - South African Journal of Philosophy 37 (3):347-360.
    In two papers earlier in his career, Siméon Rajaona—one of Madagascar's most famous intellectuals—argues that Westerners have tended to distort the Malagasy worldview by interpolating Western notions into their understanding of it. As a result, the authentic characteristics of the Malagasy mind have been missed by many in the West. He claims that when compared to Westerners, Malagasy have a distinct notion of truth, a different style of reasoning, a different conceptual connection with the world, and a distinct ethical (...)
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  3. Chapter Fourteen The Hearing Dimension of 3D Virtual Worlds: Unexploited Opportunities Ludmil Duridanov.Simeon J. Simoff - 2007 - In Soraj Hongladarom (ed.), Computing and Philosophy in Asia. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 205.
  4. Mary Magdalene and Many Others: Women Who Followed Jesus.Carla Ricci & Paul Burns - 1994
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  5.  8
    Book Review: Mary Magdalene and Many Others: Women Who Followed Jesus. [REVIEW]Elizabeth A. Castelli - 1996 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 50 (4):430-431.
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  6.  38
    What Priest (Amongst Many Others) has Been Missing.Hartley Slater - 2010 - Ratio 23 (2):184-198.
    It is shown that there are categorical differences between sentences and statements, which have the consequence in particular that there are no paradoxical cases of self-reference with the latter as there are with the former. The point corrects an extensive train of thought that Graham Priest has pursued over recent years, but also a much wider tradition in logic and the foundations of mathematics that has been dominant for over a century. That tradition might be broadly characterized as Formalist, or (...)
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  7. Freedom and Leisure in the Networks of Technological Objects and Many Others.Vincent Shen - 2010 - Philosophy and Culture 37 (9):91-104.
    In this paper, comparative philosophy from the point of view, accusing both the freedom of human existence is related to: human freedom is the freedom in the relationship, human relationship is the relationship in freedom. Today, however, are in a rapidly changing technology and globalization are shaping the technology products and among the diverse network of his freedom and development of their relationship. For me, if not free then there is no leisure at all, even the Bliss half a day, (...)
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  8. Chapter Thirteen Philosophical Foundations for A Unified Enterprise Modelling Language.Gerald R. Khoury & Simeon J. Simoff - 2007 - In Soraj Hongladarom (ed.), Computing and Philosophy in Asia. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 191.
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  9. Existence and Many-One Identity.Jason Turner - 2013 - Philosophical Quarterly 63 (250):313-329.
    C endorses the doctrine of Composition as Identity, which holds that a composite object is identical to its many parts, and entails that one object can be identical to several others. In this dialogue, N argues that many‐one identity, and thus composition as identity, is conceptually confused. In particular, N claims it violates two conceptual truths: that existence facts fix identity facts, and that identity is no addition to being. In response to pressure from C, N considers (...)
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  10.  8
    Using Game Description Language for Mediated Dispute Resolution.Dave de Jonge, Tomas Trescak, Carles Sierra, Simeon Simoff & Ramon López de Mántaras - 2019 - AI and Society 34 (4):767-784.
    Mediation is a process in which two parties agree to resolve their dispute by negotiating over alternative solutions presented by a mediator. In order to construct such solutions, the mediator brings more information and knowledge, and, if possible, resources to the negotiation table. In order to do so, the mediator faces the challenge of determining which information is relevant to the current problem, given a vast database of knowledge. The contribution of this paper is the automated mediation machinery to resolve (...)
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  11.  8
    An Instrument Can Hide Many Others: Or How Multiple Instruments Grow Into a Polymorphic Instrumentation.Vincent Simoulin - 2017 - Social Science Information 56 (3):416-433.
    The development of an instrument is often analysed in a rather heroic fashion, as though it had single-handedly brought about the evolution of a whole scientific field. But instruments can also be regrouped within a wider instrumentation, in which they may be regularly reconstructed and rearticulated in such a way as to serve many different scientific purposes. This flexibility has a cost, which is on one hand the task of reconstruction, and on the other the monitoring systems that must (...)
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  12.  7
    Existence and Many‐One Identity.Jason Turner - 2013 - Philosophical Quarterly 63 (251):313-329.
    C endorses the doctrine of Composition as Identity, which holds that a composite object is identical to its many parts, and entails that one object can be identical to several others. In this dialogue, N argues that many‐one identity, and thus composition as identity, is conceptually confused. In particular, N claims it violates two conceptual truths: that existence facts fix identity facts, and that identity is no addition to being. In response to pressure from C, N considers (...)
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  13. Plural Descriptions and Many-Valued Functions.Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley - 2005 - Mind 114 (456):1039-1068.
    Russell had two theories of definite descriptions: one for singular descriptions, another for plural descriptions. We chart its development, in which ‘On Denoting’ plays a part but not the part one might expect, before explaining why it eventually fails. We go on to consider many-valued functions, since they too bring in plural terms—terms such as ‘4’ or the descriptive ‘the inhabitants of London’ which, like plain plural descriptions, stand for more than one thing. Logicians need to take plural reference (...)
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  14.  21
    Leave No Poor Behind: Globalization and the Imperative of Socio-Economic and Development Rights From an African Perspective.Simeon O. Ilesanmi - 2004 - Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (1):71 - 92.
    Globalization is being celebrated in many circles as a distinctive achievement of our age, drawing peoples and societies more closely together and creating far greater wealth than any previous generations ever knew. While the first of these assertions is correct in the sense that societies and cultures are colliding, hitherto relatively closed horizons are opening up, and spaces and time are compressing, the second deserves critical interrogations. Using Africa's experience with globalization as a case study, this article argues that (...)
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  15.  4
    Leave No Poor Behind:. Globalization and the Imperative of Socio-Economic and Development Rights From an African Perspective.Simeon O. Ilesanmi - 2004 - Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (1):71-94.
    Globalization is being celebrated in many circles as a distinctive achievement of our age, drawing peoples and societies more closely together and creating far greater wealth than any previous generations ever knew. While the first of these assertions is correct in the sense that societies and cultures are colliding, hitherto relatively closed horizons are opening up, and spaces and time are compressing, the second deserves critical interrogations. Using Africa's experience with globalization as a case study, this article argues that (...)
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  16.  29
    On Hans, Zou and the Others: Wonder Animals and the Question of Animal Intelligence in Early Twentieth-Century France.Sofie Lachapelle & Jenna Healey - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (1):12-20.
    During the second half of the nineteenth century, the advent of widespread pet ownership was accompanied by claims of heightened animal abilities. Psychical researchers investigated many of these claims, including animal telepathy and ghostly apparitions. By the beginning of the twentieth century, news of horses and dogs with the ability to read and calculate fascinated the French public and scientists alike. Amidst questions about the justification of animal cruelty in laboratory experiments, wonder animals came to represent some extraordinary possibilities (...)
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  17.  10
    Tracking and Representing Others’ Mental States.Stephen A. Butterfill - 2017 - In K. Andrews & J. Beck (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Animal Minds. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 269-279.
    Few things matter more than the mental states of those nearby. Their ignorance defines limits on cooperation and presents opportunities to exploit in competition. What others feel, see and know can also provide information about events otherwise beyond your ken. It’s no surprise, then, that abilities to track others’ mental states are widespread. Many animals, including scrub jays, ravens, goats, dogs, ring-tailed lemurs, monkeys and chimpanzees, reliably vary their actions in ways that are appropriate given facts about (...)
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  18.  2
    One and Many: A Test-Case for Whitehead's Metaphysics for South Asian Philosophy.Robert Cummings Neville - 2011 - Tattva - Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):1-10.
    Unlike John Cobb, Jr., and others, I argue that the problems of pluralism cannot even be formulated accurately without a far more complicated thoery of religions than usually functions in the pluralism discussions. A thory of religious worldviews is sketched that shows that religious symbols need to the proximate, from the sophisticated to folk religion, from explicit values to implicit functioning values, from tight determination of the life to loose determination, from deep commitment to light commitment.
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  19.  10
    Modal and Many-Valued Logics: Acta Philosophica Fennica. [REVIEW]S. C. N. - 1964 - Review of Metaphysics 18 (1):188-188.
    The proceedings of an international colloquium held at Helsinki in 1962, containing twenty papers likely to further debate in the title areas. Contributors include Anderson, Geach, Hintikka, Lemmon, Marcus, Montague, Prior, Rescher and others.—N. S. C.
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  20.  79
    Many Worlds?: Everett, Quantum Theory, & Reality.Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.) - 2010 - Oxford University Press UK.
    What would it mean to apply quantum theory, without restriction and without involving any notion of measurement and state reduction, to the whole universe? What would realism about the quantum state then imply? This book brings together an illustrious team of philosophers and physicists to debate these questions. The contributors broadly agree on the need, or aspiration, for a realist theory that unites micro- and macro-worlds. But they disagree on what this implies. Some argue that if unitary quantum evolution has (...)
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  21.  2
    Emotions and Ethical Decision Making at Work: Organizational Norms, Emotional Dogs, and the Rational Tales They Tell Themselves and Others.Joseph McManus - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (1):153-168.
    Organizations have become essential institutions that facilitate the vital coordination and cooperation necessary to create value across societies. Recent research within moral psychology and behavioral ethics indicates that emotions play a pivotal role in promoting ethical decision making. The theory developed here maintains that most organizations retain norms that disfavor the experience and expression of many strong emotions while at work. This dynamic inhibits individual’s ability to generate moral intuitions and reason about ethical issues they encounter. This occurs as (...)
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  22.  41
    Communications to Self and Others: Emotional Experience and its Skills.Keith Oatley - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (3):206-213.
    According to the Communicative Theory of Emotions, we experience emotions when events occur that are important for our goals and plans. A method of choice for studying these matters is the emotion diary. Emotions configure our cognitive systems and our relationships. Many of our emotions concern our relationships, and empathy is central to our experience of them. We do not always recognize our emotions or the emotions of others, but literary fiction can help improve our skills of recognition (...)
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  23.  25
    Unto Others.David Sloan Wilson & Elliott Sober - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):681-684.
    It is a challenge to explain how evolutionary altruism can evolve by the process of natural selection, since altruists in a group will be less fit than the selfish individuals in the same group who receive benefits but do not make donations of their own. Darwin proposed a theory of group selection to solve this puzzle. Very simply, even though altruists are less fit than selfish individuals within any single group, groups of altruists are more fit than groups of selfish (...)
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  24.  2
    The Many Faces of RU486: Tales of Situated Knowledges and Technological Contestations.Theresa Montini & Adele Clarke - 1993 - Science, Technology and Human Values 18 (1):42-78.
    In the highly contentious abortion arena, the new oral abortifacient technology RU486 is one among many actors. This article offers an arena analysis of the heterogeneous constructions of RU486 by various actors, including scientists, pharmaceutical compa nies, medical groups, antiabortion groups, women's health movement groups, and others who have produced situated knowledges. Conceptually, we find not only that the identity of the nonhuman actor-RU486 -is unstable and multiple but also that, in practice, there are other implicated actors—the downstream (...)
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  25. Small Impacts and Imperceptible Effects: Causing Harm with Others.Kai Spiekermann - 2014 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 38 (1):75-90.
  26. One Phenomenon, Many Models: Inconsistency and Complementarity.Margaret Morrison - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (2):342-351.
    The paper examines philosophical issues that arise in contexts where one has many different models for treating the same system. I show why in some cases this appears relatively unproblematic (models of turbulence) while others represent genuine difficulties when attempting to interpret the information that models provide (nuclear models). What the examples show is that while complementary models needn’t be a hindrance to knowledge acquisition, the kind of inconsistency present in nuclear cases is, since it is indicative of (...)
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  27. The Many Faces of Empathy.Michael Slote - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (3):843-855.
    Empathy has become a hot topic in philosophy and more generally, but its many uses haven’t yet been recognized. Empathy has epistemological applications beyond its ability to put us directly in contact with the minds of others, and its role in ethics has been underestimated: it can, for example, help the present-day sentimentalist make sense of Francis Hutcheson’s idea of a moral sense. Most notably, perhaps, empathy also plays an important role in speech acts that speech act theorists (...)
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  28. Many-One Identity.Donald L. M. Baxter - 1988 - Philosophical Papers 17 (3):193-216.
    Two things become one thing, something having parts, and something becoming something else, are cases of many things being identical with one thing. This apparent contradiction introduces others concerning transitivity of identity, discernibility of identicals, existence, and vague existence. I resolve the contradictions with a theory that identity, number, and existence are relative to standards for counting. What are many on some standard are one and the same on another. The theory gives an account of the discernibility (...)
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  29. The Many Faces of Empathy: Parsing Emathic Phenomena Through a Proximate, Dynamic-Systems View Reprsenting the Other in the Self.Stephanie D. Preston & Alicia J. Hofelich - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (1):24-33.
    A surfeit of research confirms that people activate personal, affective, and conceptual representations when perceiving the states of others. However, researchers continue to debate the role of self–other overlap in empathy due to a failure to dissociate neural overlap, subjective resonance, and personal distress. A perception–action view posits that neural-level overlap is necessary during early processing for all social understanding, but need not be conscious or aversive. This neural overlap can subsequently produce a variety of states depending on the (...)
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  30. Deciding for Others: The Ethics of Surrogate Decision Making.Allen E. Buchanan & Dan W. Brock - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the most comprehensive treatment available of one of the most urgent - and yet in some respects most neglected - problems in bioethics: decision-making for incompetents. Part I develops a general theory for making treatment and care decisions for patients who are not competent to decide for themselves. It provides an in-depth analysis of competence, articulates and defends a coherent set of principles to specify suitable surrogate decisionmakers and to guide their choices, examines the value of advance (...)
     
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  31.  22
    Harms to “Others” and the Selection Against Disability View.Nicola Jane Williams - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (2):154-183.
    In recent years, the question of whether prospective parents might have a moral obligation to select against disability in their offspring has piqued the attention of many prominent philosophers and bioethicists, and a large literature has emerged surrounding this question. Rather than looking to the most common arguments given in support of a positive response to the abovementioned question, such as those focusing on the harms disability may impose on the child created, duties and role-specific obligations, and impersonal ‘harms’, (...)
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  32.  99
    Classical Computationalism and the Many Problems of Cognitive Relevance.Richard Samuels - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (3):280-293.
    In this paper I defend the classical computational account of reasoning against a range of highly influential objections, sometimes called relevance problems. Such problems are closely associated with the frame problem in artificial intelligence and, to a first approximation, concern the issue of how humans are able to determine which of a range of representations are relevant to the performance of a given cognitive task. Though many critics maintain that the nature and existence of such problems provide grounds for (...)
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  33. How Many Kinds of Consciousness?David M. Rosenthal - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):653-665.
    Ned BlockÕs influential distinction between phenomenal and access consciousness has become a staple of current discussions of consciousness. It is not often noted, however, that his distinction tacitly embodies unargued theoretical assumptions that favor some theoretical treatments at the expense of others. This is equally so for his less widely discussed distinction between phenomenal consciousness and what he calls reflexive consciousness. I argue that the distinction between phenomenal and access consciousness, as Block draws it, is untenable. Though mental states (...)
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  34. Testimony: Acquiring Knowledge From Others.Jennifer Lackey - 2010 - In Alvin I. Goldman & Dennis Whitcomb (eds.), Social Epistemology: Essential Readings. Oxford University Press.
    Virtually everything we know depends in some way or other on the testimony of others—what we eat, how things work, where we go, even who we are. We do not, after all, perceive firsthand the preparation of the ingredients in many of our meals, or the construction of the devices we use to get around the world, or the layout of our planet, or our own births and familial histories. These are all things we are told. Indeed, subtracting (...)
     
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  35. The Desires of Others.Berislav Marušić - 2010 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):385-400.
    An influential view, defended by Thomas Scanlon and others, holds that desires are almost never reasons. I seek to resist this view and show that someone who desires something does thereby have a reason to satisfy her desire. To show this, I argue, first, that the desires of some others are reasons for us and, second, that our own desires are no less reason-giving than those of others. In concluding, I emphasize that accepting my view does not (...)
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  36.  19
    Imagining Cities, Others: Strangers, Contingency and Fear.John Rundell - 2014 - Thesis Eleven 121 (1):9-22.
    This paper explores the constellation of fear and the social forces, assumptions and images that construct it. The paper’s underlying presupposition is that there are many locations for fear that run parallel to one another in modernity, one of which will be discussed here – the city. It begins by exploring two images and ideas of the city, around which the social theoretical tradition has revolved, both of which are linked in some way to the ideal of the metropolis (...)
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  37. Many-Valued Modal Logics II.Melvin Fitting - unknown
    Suppose there are several experts, with some dominating others (expert A dominates expert B if B says something is true whenever A says it is). Suppose, further, that each of the experts has his or her own view of what is possible — in other words each of the experts has their own Kripke model in mind (subject, of course, to the dominance relation that may hold between experts). How will they assign truth values to sentences in a common (...)
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  38.  18
    Language and the Society of Others.Guy Robinson - 1992 - Philosophy 67 (261):329 - 341.
    The solitary language user is again stalking the critical fields of Europe . This pre-social individual, abstracted from all social and historical context, has been seemingly revived after what many of us saw as a death-blow dealt by Wittgenstein in his analysis of the notion of following a rule , and his related discussions bringing out the impossibilities of a ‘private’ language—what has come to be known as Wittgenstein's ‘private language argument’. Just what a ‘private language’ is has become (...)
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  39. Some Neural Networks Compute, Others Don't.Gualtiero Piccinini - 2008 - Neural Networks 21 (2-3):311-321.
    I address whether neural networks perform computations in the sense of computability theory and computer science. I explicate and defend
    the following theses. (1) Many neural networks compute—they perform computations. (2) Some neural networks compute in a classical way.
    Ordinary digital computers, which are very large networks of logic gates, belong in this class of neural networks. (3) Other neural networks
    compute in a non-classical way. (4) Yet other neural networks do not perform computations. Brains may well fall into this last class.
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  40. The Many‐Worlds Interpretation and Quantum Computation.Armond Duwell - 2007 - Philosophy of Science 74 (5):1007-1018.
    David Deutsch and others have suggested that the Many-Worlds Interpretation of quantum mechanics is the only interpretation capable of explaining the special efficiency quantum computers seem to enjoy over classical ones. I argue that this view is not tenable. Using a toy algorithm I show that the Many-Worlds Interpretation must crucially use the ontological status of the universal state vector to explain quantum computational efficiency, as opposed to the particular ontology of the MWI, that is, the computational (...)
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  41. Victims, Vectors and Villains: Are Those Who Opt Out of Vaccination Morally Responsible for the Deaths of Others?Euzebiusz Jamrozik, Toby Handfield & Michael J. Selgelid - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics (12):762-768.
    Mass vaccination has been a successful public health strategy for many contagious diseases. The immunity of the vaccinated also protects others who cannot be safely or effectively vaccinated—including infants and the immunosuppressed. When vaccination rates fall, diseases like measles can rapidly resurge in a population. Those who cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons are at the highest risk of severe disease and death. They thus may bear the burden of others' freedom to opt out of vaccination. It (...)
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  42.  8
    The Many-Level-Structure of Language.Friedrich Waismann - 2018 - Epistemology and Philosophy of Science 55 (4):219-230.
    The author attempts to sketch a new picture of language: language is stratified into layers, each layer having a logic of its own and being separated from the others by gaps over which one may jump but which cannot be bridged by logical processes. Philosophers try to bridge the gaps and become entangled in pseudo-problems. Law statements exemplify one stratum, thing statements another, sense-datum statements another, ethical statements another, and so on. The different subject-matters are to be characterized by (...)
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  43. The Many Moral Particularisms.Michael Ridge - 2005 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (1):83 - 106.
    What place, if any, moral principles should or do have in moral life has been a longstanding question for moral philosophy. For some, the proposition that moral philosophy should strive to articulate moral principles has been an article of faith. At least since Aristotle, however, there has been a rich counter-tradition that questions the possibility or value of trying to capture morality in principled terms. In recent years, philosophers who question principled approaches to morality have argued under the banner of (...)
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  44.  81
    Are Some Inequalities More Unequal Than Others? Nature, Nurture and Equality.Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen - 2004 - Utilitas 16 (2):193-219.
    Many egalitarians believe that social inequalities are worse than natural ones. Others deny that one can coherently distinguish between them. I argue that although one can separate the influence of these factors by an analysis of variance, the distinction is morally irrelevant. It might be alleged that my argument in favour of moral irrelevance attacks a straw man. While I think this allegation is incorrect, I accommodate it by distinguishing between four claims that are related to, and sometimes (...)
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  45.  98
    Semantics in Support of Biodiversity: An Introduction to the Biological Collections Ontology and Related Ontologies.Ramona L. Walls, John Deck, Robert Guralnik, Steve Baskauf, Reed Beaman, Stanley Blum, Shawn Bowers, Pier Luigi Buttigieg, Neil Davies, Dag Endresen, Maria Alejandra Gandolfo, Robert Hanner, Alyssa Janning, Barry Smith & Others - 2014 - PLoS ONE 9 (3):1-13.
    The study of biodiversity spans many disciplines and includes data pertaining to species distributions and abundances, genetic sequences, trait measurements, and ecological niches, complemented by information on collection and measurement protocols. A review of the current landscape of metadata standards and ontologies in biodiversity science suggests that existing standards such as the Darwin Core terminology are inadequate for describing biodiversity data in a semantically meaningful and computationally useful way. Existing ontologies, such as the Gene Ontology and others in (...)
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  46.  22
    Deficits in the Ability to Recognize One’s Own Affects and Those of Others: Associations with Neurocognition, Symptoms and Sexual Trauma Among Persons with Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders.Paul H. Lysaker, Andrew Gumley, Martin Brüne, Stijn Vanheule, Kelly D. Buck & Giancarlo Dimaggio - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1183-1192.
    While many with schizophrenia experience deficits in metacognition it is unclear whether those deficits are related to other features of illness. To explore this issue, the current study classified participants with schizophrenia as possessing a deficit in both awareness of their own emotions and those of others , aware of their own emotions but unaware of the emotions of others and aware of their own emotions and of other’s emotions . Groups were compared on assessments of neurocognitive (...)
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  47. Quine’s Conjecture on Many-Sorted Logic.Thomas William Barrett & Hans Halvorson - 2017 - Synthese 194 (9):3563-3582.
    Quine often argued for a simple, untyped system of logic rather than the typed systems that were championed by Russell and Carnap, among others. He claimed that nothing important would be lost by eliminating sorts, and the result would be additional simplicity and elegance. In support of this claim, Quine conjectured that every many-sorted theory is equivalent to a single-sorted theory. We make this conjecture precise, and prove that it is true, at least according to one reasonable notion (...)
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  48.  36
    Many-Hilbert-Spaces Theory of Quantum Measurements.Mikio Namiki - 1988 - Foundations of Physics 18 (1):29-55.
    The many-Hilbert-spaces theory of quantum measurements, which was originally proposed by S. Machida and the present author, is reviewed and developed. Dividing a typical quantum measurement in two successive steps, the first being responsible for spectral decomposition and the second for detection, we point out that the wave packet reduction by measurement takes place at the latter step, through interaction of an object system with one of the local systems of detectors. First we discuss the physics of the detection (...)
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  49. Dion, Theon, and the Many-Thinkers Problem.Michael B. Burke - 2004 - Analysis 64 (3):242–250.
    Dion is a full-bodied man. Theon is that part of him which consists of all of him except his left foot. What becomes of Dion and Theon when Dion’s left foot is amputated? In Burke 1994, employing the doctrine of sortal essentialism, I defended a surprising position last defended by Chrysippus: that Dion survives while the seemingly unscathed Theon perishes. This paper defends that position against objections by Stone, Carter, Olson, and others. Most notably, it offers a novel, conservative (...)
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  50. Mortals and Others.Bertrand Russell - 2009 - Routledge.
    Between 1931 and 1935, Bertrand Russell contributed some 156 essays to the literary pages of the American newspaper New York American . These were often fun, humorous observations on the very real issues of the day, such as the Depression, the rise of Nazism and Prohibition, to more perennial themes such as love, parenthood, education and friendship. Available for the first time in the Routledge Classics series in a single volume, this pithy, provocative and often-personal collection of essays brings together (...)
     
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