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Simon P. James [29]Simon James [5]Simon R. James [1]Simon J. James [1]
  1.  5
    The Interplay of Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Political Activity in Emerging Markets: The Role of Strategic Flexibility in Non‐Market Strategies.Rifat Kamasak, Simon R. James & Meltem Yavuz - 2019 - Business Ethics: A European Review 28 (3):305-320.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
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  2. Buddhism, Virtue and Environment.David E. Cooper & Simon P. James - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (1):138-140.
     
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  3. The Presence of Nature: A Study in Phenomenology and Environmental Philosophy.Simon P. James - 2009 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  4. Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics.Simon P. James - 2005 - Environmental Values 14 (2):281-283.
     
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  5.  7
    Why Old Things Matter.Simon P. James - 2015 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 12 (3):313-329.
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  6.  18
    Finding - and Failing to Find - Meaning in Nature.Simon P. James - 2013 - Environmental Values 22 (5):609-625.
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  7.  38
    Ecosystem Services and the Value of Places.Simon James - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (1):101-113.
    In the US Environmental Protection Agency, the World Wide Fund for Nature and many other environmental organisations, it is standard practice to evaluate particular woods, wetlands and other such places on the basis of the ‘ecosystem services’ they are thought to provide. I argue that this practice cannot account for one important way in which places are of value to human beings. When they play integral roles in our lives, particular places have a kind of value which cannot be adequately (...)
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  8.  5
    Why Old Things Matter.Simon James - 2014 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (4).
    It is, I suggest, unclear whether any old inanimate objects deserve to be treated with respect simply because they are old. Yet this does not entail that an object’s age has no bearing at all on the question of how it may permissibly be treated. I defend the claim that those who fail to take seriously the histories of old inanimate objects typically deserve to be criticized on aretaic grounds. Such people, I argue, tend to lack the virtue of humility.
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  9.  22
    Suffering and the Primacy of Virtue.Simon P. James - 2019 - Analysis 79 (4):605-613.
    Some people claim that some instances of suffering are intrinsically bad in an impersonal way. If it were true, that claim might seem to count against virtue ethics and for consequentialism. Drawing on the works of Jason Kawall, Christine Swanton and Nietzsche, I consider some reasons for thinking that it is, however, false. I argue, moreover, that even if it were true, a virtue ethicist could consistently acknowledge its truth.
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  10.  33
    Protecting Nature for the Sake of Human Beings.Simon P. James - 2016 - Ratio 29 (2):213-227.
    It is often assumed that to say that nature should be protected for the sake of human beings just is to say that it should be protected because it is a means to one or more anthropocentric ends. I argue that this assumption is false. In some contexts, claims that a particular natural X should be protected for our sakes mean that X should be protected, not because it is a means to anthropocentric ends, but because it is part of (...)
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  11.  13
    Why Old Things Matter.Simon James - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):313-329.
    It is, I suggest, unclear whether any old inanimate objects deserve to be treated with respect simply because they are old. Yet this does not entail that an object’s age has no bearing at all on the question of how it may permissibly be treated. I defend the claim that those who fail to take seriously the histories of old inanimate objects typically deserve to be criticized on aretaic grounds. Such people, I argue, tend to lack the virtue of humility.
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  12.  8
    Nature’s Indifference.Simon P. James - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):115-128.
    Contrary to what writers such as Hans Jonas and Val Plumwood suggest, much of nature is indifferent to human interests. Mountains, glaciers, sun-baked salt pans—such entities care neither about what interests us humans nor about what is objectively in our interests. It might be hard to see how the property of being indifferent, in this sense, could add value. But it can. For those of us who inhabit highly technological, user-friendly environments, entities such as mountains can have therapeutic value precisely (...)
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  13.  76
    “Thing-Centered” Holism in Buddhism, Heidegger, and Deep Ecology.Simon P. James - 2000 - Environmental Ethics 22 (4):359-375.
    I address the problem of reconciling environmental holism with the intrinsic value of individual beings. Drawing upon Madhyamaka Buddhism, the later philosophy of Martin Heidegger, and deep ecology, I present a distinctly holistic conception of nature that, nevertheless, retains a commitment to the intrinsic worth of individual beings. I conclude with an examination of the practical implications of this “thing-centered holism” for environmental ethics.
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  14.  33
    Human Virtues and Natural Values.Simon P. James - 2006 - Environmental Ethics 28 (4):339-353.
    In several works, Holmes Rolston, III has argued that a satisfactory environmental ethic cannot be built on a virtue ethical foundation. His first argument amounts to the charge that because virtue ethics is by nature “self-centered” or egoistic, it is also inherently “human-centered” and hence ill suited to treating environmental matters. According to his second argument, virtue ethics is perniciously human-centeredsince it “locates” the value of a thing, not in the thing itself, but in the agent who is “ennobled” by (...)
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  15.  13
    Natural Meanings and Cultural Values.Simon P. James - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (1):3-16.
    In many cases, rivers, mountains, forests, and other so-called natural entities have value for us because they contribute to our well-being. According to the standard model of such value, they have instrumental or “service” value for us on account of their causal powers. That model tends, however, to come up short when applied to cases when nature contributes to our well-being by virtue of the religious, political, historical, personal, or mythic meanings it bears. To make sense of such cases, a (...)
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  16.  79
    Merleau‐Ponty, Metaphysical Realism and the Natural World1.Simon P. James - 2007 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (4):501 – 519.
    Environmental thinkers often suppose that the natural world (or some parts of it, at least) exists in its own right, independent of human concerns. The arguments developed in this paper suggest that it is possible to do justice to this thought without endorsing some form of metaphysical realism. Thus the early sections look to Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception to develop an anti-realist account of the independent reality of the natural world, one, it is argued, that has certain advantages over the (...)
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  17.  30
    Against Holism:Rethinking Buddhist Environmental Ethics.Simon P. James - 2007 - Environmental Values 16 (4):447-461.
    Environmental thinkers sympathetic to Buddhism sometimes reason as follows: (1) A holistic view of the world, according to which humans are regarded as being 'one' with nature, will necessarily engender environmental concern; (2) the Buddhist teaching of 'emptiness' represents such a view; therefore (3) Buddhism is an environmentally-friendly religion. In this paper, I argue that the first premise of this argument is false (a holistic view of the world can be reconciled with a markedly eco-unfriendly attitude) as is the second (...)
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  18.  19
    “Nothing Truly Wild is Unclean”: Muir, Misanthropy, and the Aesthetics of Dirt.Simon P. James - 2014 - Environmental Ethics 36 (3):357-363.
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  19.  32
    Buddhism and the Ethics of Species Conservation.Simon P. James - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (1):85 - 97.
    Efforts to conserve endangered species of animal are, in some important respects, at odds with Buddhist ethics. On the one hand, being abstract entities, species cannot suffer, and so cannot be proper objects of compassion or similar moral virtues. On the other, Buddhist commitments to equanimity tend to militate against the idea that the individual members of endangered species have greater value than those of less-threatened ones. This paper suggests that the contribution of Buddhism to the issue of species conservation (...)
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  20.  63
    For the Sake of a Stone? Inanimate Things and the Demands of Morality.Simon P. James - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (4):384-397.
    Abstract Everyday inanimate things such as stones, teapots and bicycles are not objects to which moral agents could have direct duties; they do not have moral status. It is usually assumed that there is therefore no reason to think that a morally good person would, on account of her goodness, be disposed to treat them well for their own sakes. I challenge this assumption. I begin by showing that to act for the sake of an entity need not be to (...)
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  21.  16
    Cherished Places and Ecosystem Services.Simon P. James - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (3):264-266.
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  22.  43
    Zen Buddhism and the Intrinsic Value of Nature.Simon P. James - 2003 - Contemporary Buddhism 4 (2):143-157.
    It is a perennial theme in the literature on environmental ethics that the exploitation of the environment is the result of a blindness to (or perhaps a refusal to recognize) the intrinsic value of natural beings. The general story here is that Western traditions of thought have tended to accord natural beings value only to the extent that they prove useful to humans, that they have tended to see nature as only instrumentally valuable. By contrast, it is said that a (...)
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  23.  8
    Human Virtues and Natural Values.Simon P. James - 2006 - Environmental Ethics 28 (4):339-353.
    In several works, Holmes Rolston, III has argued that a satisfactory environmental ethic cannot be built on a virtue ethical foundation. His first argument amounts to the charge that because virtue ethics is by nature “self-centered” or egoistic, it is also inherently “human-centered” and hence ill suited to treating environmental matters. According to his second argument, virtue ethics is perniciously human-centeredsince it “locates” the value of a thing, not in the thing itself, but in the agent who is “ennobled” by (...)
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  24.  37
    Phenomenology and the Problem of Animal Minds.Simon P. James - 2009 - Environmental Values 18 (1):33 - 49.
    Attempts to determine whether nonhuman animals have minds are often thought to raise a particular sceptical concern; I call it the problem of animal minds. If there are such things as animal minds, the sceptic reasons, they will be private realms to which we humans do not have direct epistemological access. So how could one ever know for certain that animals are not mindless mechanisms? In this paper I use a phenomenological approach to show that this familiar sceptical problem presupposes (...)
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  25.  26
    Merleau‐Ponty and Metaphysical Realism.Simon P. James - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy 26 (4):1312-1323.
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  26.  40
    Philistinism and the Preservation of Nature: Simon P. James.Simon P. James - 2013 - Philosophy 88 (1):101-114.
    It is clear that natural entities can be preserved – they can be preserved because they can be harmed or destroyed, or in various other ways adversely affected. I argue that in light of the rise of scientism and other forms of philistinism, the political, religious, mythic, personal and historical meanings that people find in those entities can also be preserved. Against those who impugn disciplines such as fine arts, philosophy and sociology, I contend that this sort of preservation requires (...)
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  27.  37
    Cultural Ecosystem Services: A Critical Assessment.Simon P. James - 2015 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):338-350.
    This paper is about the practice of evaluating ecosystems on the basis of the cultural services they provide. My first aim is to assess the various objections that have been made to this practice. My second is to argue that when particular places are integral to people’s lives, their value cannot be adequately conceived in terms of the provision of cultural ecosystem services. It follows, I conclude, that the ecosystem services framework can provide only a very limited account of the (...)
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  28.  9
    Madhyamaka, Metaphysical Realism, and the Possibility of an Ancestral World.Simon P. James - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 68 (4):1116-1133.
    It is the evening of January 11, 1951. A. J. Ayer retires to a Parisian bar for a post-lecture drink, where he is joined by Georges Batailles, Maurice MerleauPonty, and the physicist Georges Ambrosino. They argue until 3 a.m. The point at issue: Was there a sun before human beings existed? Ayer says "yes," the other three say "no."1Now imagine that a fifth person joins the debate—a Mādhyamika. She argues that because nothing exists independently of conceptual imputation, since, as she (...)
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  29.  16
    The Trouble with Environmental Values.Simon P. James - 2016 - Environmental Values 25 (2):131-144.
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  30.  29
    Buddhism and the Environment.Simon James & David Cooper - 2007 - Contemporary Buddhism 8 (2):93-96.
  31.  6
    Technology and Utopia by Howard P. Segal. [REVIEW]Simon J. James - 2009 - Utopian Studies 20 (1):173-175.
  32.  23
    An Introduction to Buddhist Ethics by Peter Harvey Cambridge University Press, 2000, Pp. XX + 478.Simon P. James - 2001 - Philosophy 76 (1):158-174.
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  33.  7
    Letting Nature Take its Course.Simon P. James - 2016 - Environmental Values 25 (4):381-384.
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  34.  5
    Conflict and Resolution.Simon P. James - 2017 - Environmental Values 26 (5):535-538.
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  35.  3
    An Introduction to Buddhist Ethics. [REVIEW]Simon James - 2001 - Philosophy 76 (1):158-174.
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  36. Environmental Philosophy: An Introduction.Simon P. James - 2015 - Polity.
    Climate change, habitat loss, rising extinction rates - such problems call for more than just new policies and practices. They raise fundamental questions about the world and our place in it. What, for instance, is the natural world? Do we humans belong to it? Which parts of it are we morally obliged to protect? Drawing on an exceptionally wide range of sources, from virtue ethics to Buddhism, leading environmental philosopher Simon P. James sets out to answer these vitally important questions. (...)
     
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