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  1.  31
    Physicians' Silent Decisions: Because Patient Autonomy Does Not Always Come First.Simon N. Whitney & Laurence B. McCullough - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (7):33 – 38.
    Physicians make some medical decisions without disclosure to their patients. Nondisclosure is possible because these are silent decisions to refrain from screening, diagnostic or therapeutic interventions. Nondisclosure is ethically permissible when the usual presumption that the patient should be involved in decisions is defeated by considerations of clinical utility or patient emotional and physical well-being. Some silent decisions - not all - are ethically justified by this standard. Justified silent decisions are typically dependent on the physician's professional judgment, experience and (...)
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  2. “Snake-Oil,” “Quack Medicine,” and “Industrially Cultured Organisms:” Biovalue and the Commercialization of Human Microbiome Research. [REVIEW]Melody J. Slashinski, Sheryl A. McCurdy, Laura S. Achenbaum, Simon N. Whitney & Amy L. McGuire - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):28-.
    Background Continued advances in human microbiome research and technologies raise a number of ethical, legal, and social challenges. These challenges are associated not only with the conduct of the research, but also with broader implications, such as the production and distribution of commercial products promising maintenance or restoration of good physical health and disease prevention. In this article, we document several ethical, legal, and social challenges associated with the commercialization of human microbiome research, focusing particularly on how this research is (...)
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  3.  5
    Institutional Review Boards: A Flawed System of Risk Management.Simon N. Whitney - 2016 - Research Ethics 12 (4):182-200.
    Institutional Review Boards and their federal overseers protect human subjects, but this vital work is often dysfunctional despite their conscientious efforts. A cardinal, but unrecognized, explanation is that IRBs are performing a specific function – the management of risk – using a flawed theoretical and practical approach. At the time of the IRB system’s creation, risk management theory emphasized the suppression of risk. Since then, scholars of governance, studying the experience of business and government, have learned that we must distinguish (...)
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  4.  25
    Consent: Informed, Simple, Implied and Presumed.Laurence B. McCullough, Amy L. McGuire & Simon N. Whitney - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):49-50.
  5.  23
    Responses to Open Peer Commentaries on "Physicians' Silent Decisions: Because Patient Autonomy Doesn't Always Come First".Simon N. Whitney & Laurence B. McCullough - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (7):1-3.
    Physicians make some medical decisions without disclosure to their patients. Nondisclosure is possible because these are silent decisions to refrain from screening, diagnostic or therapeutic interventions. Nondisclosure is ethically permissible when the usual presumption that the patient should be involved in decisions is defeated by considerations of clinical utility or patient emotional and physical well-being. Some silent decisions—not all—are ethically justified by this standard. Justified silent decisions are typically dependent on the physician's professional judgment, experience and knowledge, and are not (...)
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  6.  4
    Case Study: The Patient, the Physician, and the Truth.Simon N. Whitney & David Spiegel - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (3):24.
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  7.  4
    The Patient, the Physician, and the Truth.Simon N. Whitney & David Spiegel - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (3):24.
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