Results for 'Simone Gralton Thornton'

997 found
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  1.  45
    Inoculation Against Wonder: Finding an Antidote in Camus, Pragmatism and the Community of Inquiry.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (9):884-898.
    In this paper, we will explore how Albert Camus has much to offer philosophers of education. Although a number of educationalists have attempted to explicate the educational implications of Camus’ literary works, these analyses have not attempted to extrapolate pedagogical guidelines towards developing an educational framework for children’s philosophical practice in the way Matthew Lipman did from John Dewey’s philosophy of education, which informed his philosophy for children curriculum and pedagogy. We focus on the phenomenology of inquiry; that is, inquiry (...)
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  2.  46
    Lucid Education: Resisting Resistance to Inquiry.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Oxford Review of Education 42 (2):165–177.
    Within the community of inquiry literature, the absence of the notion of genuine doubt is notable in spite of its pragmatic roots in the philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce, for whom the notion was pivotal. We argue for the need to correct this oversight due to the educational significance of genuine doubt—a theoretical and experiential understanding of which can offer insight into the interrelated concepts of wonder, fallibilism, inquiry and prejudice. In order to detail these connections, we reinvigorate the ideas (...)
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  3. Ecosocial Citizenship Education: Facilitating Interconnective, Deliberative Practice and Corrective Methodology for Epistemic Accountability.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15:1-20.
    According to Val Plumwood (1995), liberal-democracy is an authoritarian political system that protects privilege but fails to protect nature. A major obstacle, she says, is radical inequality, which has become increasingly far-reaching under liberal-democracy; an indicator of ‘the capacity of its privileged groups to distribute social goods upwards and to create rigidities which hinder the democratic correctiveness of social institutions’ (p. 134). This cautionary tale has repercussions for education, especially civics and citizenship education. To address this, we explore the potential (...)
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  4. Philosophy Goes to School in Australia: A History 1982-2016.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 3 (1):59-83.
    This paper is an attempt to highlight significant developments in the history of philosophy in schools in Australia. We commence by looking at the early years when Laurance Splitter visited the Institute for the Advancement for Philosophy for Children (IAPC). Then we offer an account of the events that led to the formation of what is now the Federation of Australasian Philosophy in Schools Associations (FAPSA), the development and production of a diverse range of curriculum and supporting materials for philosophy (...)
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  5. ‘Do Not Block the Way of Inquiry’: Cultivating Collective Doubt Through Sustained Deep Reflective Thinking.Gilbert Burgh, Simone Thornton & Liz Fynes-Clinton - 2018 - In Ellen Duthie, Félix García Moriyón & Rafael Robles Loro (eds.), Parecidos de familia. Propuestas actuales en Filosofía para Niños / Family Resemblances: Current trends in philosophy for children. Madrid, Spain: pp. 47-61.
    We provide a Camusian/Peircean notion of inquiry that emphasises an attitude of fallibilism and sustained epistemic dissonance as a conceptual framework for a theory of classroom practice founded on Deep Reflective Thinking (DTR), in which the cultivation of collective doubt, reflective evaluation and how these relate to the phenomenological aspects of inquiry are central to communities of inquiry. In a study by Fynes-Clinton, preliminary evidence demonstrates that if students engage in DRT, they more frequently experience cognitive dissonance and as a (...)
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  6. Philosophy for Children in Australia: Then, Now, and Where to From Here?Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Re-Engaging with Politics: Re-Imagining the University, 45th Annual Conference of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia, ACU, Melbourne, 5-8 Dec 2015.
    In the late 1960s Matthew Lipman and his colleagues at IAPC developed an educational philosophy he called Philosophy for Children. At the heart of Philosophy for Children is the community of Inquiry, with its emphasis on classroom dialogue, in the form of collaborative philosophical inquiry. In this paper we explore the development of educational practice that has grown out of Philosophy for Children in the context of Australia. -/- Australia adapted Lipman’s ideas on the educational value of practicing philosophy with (...)
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  7.  25
    Growing Up with Philosophy in Australia: Philosophy as Cultural Discourse.Simone Thornton & Gilbert Burgh - 2019 - In Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.), Philosophical Inquiry with Children: The development of an inquiring society in Australia. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 236‒249.
    As the purpose of this book is to open dialogue, we draw no conclusions. Instead, reflecting on the theoretical and practical implications that arise from each chapter, we offer some reflection through an exploration of the ways in which Australia has broadened discussions on P4C. In addition, we situate our discussion in contemporary global issues relevant to education and schooling: gender stereotyping, bias and language; Aboriginal philosophy; environmental education; and sexuality, adolescence and discrimination. As a community of children, adolescents and (...)
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  8.  28
    Making Peace Education Everyone’s Business.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2017 - In Ching-Ching Lin & Levina Sequeira (eds.), Inclusion, Diversity and Intercultural Dialogue in Young People's Philosophical Inquiry. Rotterdam: pp. 55-65.
    We argue for peace education as a process of improving the quality of everyday relationships. This is vital, as children bring their habits formed largely by social and political institutions such as the family, religion, law, cultural mores, to the classroom (Splitter, 1993; Furlong & Morrison, 2000) and vice versa. It is inevitable that the classroom habitat, as a microcosm of the community in which it is situated, will perpetuate the epistemic practices and injustices of that community, manifested in attitudes, (...)
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  9.  9
    Philosophical Inquiry with Children: The Development of an Inquiring Society in Australia.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.) - 2019 - Abingdon, UK: Routledge.
    Philosophy in schools in Australia dates back to the 1980s and is rooted in the Philosophy for Children curriculum and pedagogy. Seeing potential for educational change, Australian advocates were quick to develop new classroom resources and innovative programs that have proved influential in educational practice throughout Australia and internationally. Behind their contributions lie key philosophical and educational discussions and controversies which have shaped attempts to introduce philosophy in schools and embed it in state and national curricula. -/- Drawing together a (...)
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  10.  50
    From Harry to Philosophy Park: The Development of Philosophy for Children Resources in Australia.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2017 - In Maughn Rollins Gregory, Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris (eds.), The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children. Abingdon: Routledge. pp. 163-170.
    We offer an overview of the development and production of the diverse range of Australian P4C literature since the introduction of philosophy in schools in the early 1980s. The events and debates surrounding this literature can be viewed as an historical narrative that highlights different philosophical, educational, and strategic positions on the role of curriculum material and resources in the philosophy classroom. We argue that if we place children’s literature and purpose-written materials in opposition to one another, we could be (...)
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  11.  93
    Engagement as Dialogue: Camus, Pragmatism and Constructivist Pedagogy.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2015 - Education as Philosophies of Engagement, 44th Annual Conference of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia, Kingsgate Hotel, Hamilton, New Zealand, 22–25 November 2014.
    In this paper we will explore how Albert Camus has much to offer philosophers of education. Although a number of educationalists have attempted to explicate the educational implications of Camus’ literary works (Denton, 1964; Oliver, 1965; Götz, 1987; Curzon-Hobson, 2003; Marshall, 2007, 2008; Weddington, 2007; Roberts, 2008, 2013; Gibbons, 2013; Heraud, 2013; Roberts, Gibbons & Heraud, 2013) these analyses have not attempted to extrapolate pedagogical guidelines to develop an educational framework for children’s philosophical practice in the way Matthew Lipman did (...)
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  12.  17
    The Philosophical Classroom: An Australian Story.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2019 - In Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.), Philosophical Inquiry with Children: The development of an inquiring society in Australia. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 1-5.
  13.  27
    The Educational Cost of Philosophical Suicide: What It Means to Be Lucid.Simone Thornton - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (6):608-618.
    The struggle to become lucid is at the heart of The Myth of Sisyphus. To understand the absurd is to understand that the fit between our conception of the world and the world itself is fraught with uncertainty; lucidity is the elucidation of the absurd. To be lucid is to revolt against the type of certainty that leads to suffering; to revolt against philosophical suicide. Camus teaches us the intellectual humility that stays hands; there is no reasoning that justifies suffering. (...)
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  14.  8
    Reflecting on Place: Environmental Education as Decolonisation.Simone Thornton, Mary Graham & Gilbert Burgh - 2019 - Australian Journal of Environmental Education 35 (3):239-249.
    We argue that to face climate change, all education, from kindergarten to tertiary, needs to be underpinned by environmental education. Moreover, as a site of reframing, education when coupled with philosophy is a possible site of influencing societal reframing in order to re-examine our relations to nature or our natural environment. However, we contend that as philosophy has been largely absent from curricula, it is vital to redress this issue. Further, the environment cannot be viewed simply as subject matter for (...)
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  15.  13
    John Mcdowell.Tim Thornton - 2004 - Routledge.
    John McDowell's contribution to philosophy has ranged across Greek philosophy, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, metaphysics and ethics. His writings have drawn on the works of, amongst others, Aristotle, Kant, Hegel, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Sellars, and Davidson. His contributions have made him one of the most widely read, discussed and challenging philosophers writing today. This book provides a careful account of the main claims that McDowell advances in a number of different areas of philosophy. The interconnections between the different (...)
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  16.  14
    Values and the Singular Aims of Idiographic Inquiry.Tim Thornton - 2018 - In Raffaele De Luca Picione, Jensine Nedergaard, Maria Francesca Freda & Sergio Salvatore (eds.), Idiographic Approach to Health. Information Age Publishing.
    In response to the concern that criteriological psychiatric diagnosis, based on the DSM and ICD classifications, pigeon-holes patients, there have been calls for it to be augmented by an idiographic formulation [IDGA Workgroup, WPA 2003]. I have argued elsewhere that this is a mistake [Thornton 2008a, 2008b, 2010]. Looking back to its original proponent Wilhelm Windelband yields no clear account of the contrast between idiographic and nomothetic judgement.ing from Jaspers’ account of understanding an idea of idiographic judgement based on (...)
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  17.  86
    Change Detection Without Awareness: Do Explicit Reports Underestimate the Representation of Change in the Visual System?Diego Fernandez-Duque & Ian Thornton - 2000 - Visual Cognition 7 (1):323-344.
    Evidence from many different paradigms (e.g. change blindness, inattentional blindness, transsaccadic integration) indicate that observers are often very poor at reporting changes to their visual environment. Such evidence has been used to suggest that the spatio-temporal coherence needed to represent change can only occur in the presence of focused attention. In four experiments we use modified change blindness tasks to demonstrate (a) that sensitivity to change does occur in the absence of awareness, and (b) this sensitivity does not rely on (...)
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  18. Trading Spaces: Computation, Representation, and the Limits of Uninformed Learning.Andy Clark & S. Thornton - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):57-66.
    Some regularities enjoy only an attenuated existence in a body of training data. These are regularities whose statistical visibility depends on some systematic recoding of the data. The space of possible recodings is, however, infinitely large type-2 problems. they are standardly solved! This presents a puzzle. How, given the statistical intractability of these type-2 cases, does nature turn the trick? One answer, which we do not pursue, is to suppose that evolution gifts us with exactly the right set of recoding (...)
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  19.  36
    Karl Popper.Stephen Thornton - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  20. Representation of Change: Separate Electrophysiological Markers of Attention, Awareness, and Implicit Processing.Diego Fernandez-Duque, Giordana Grossi, Ian Thornton & Helen Neville - 2003 - Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 15 (4):491-507.
    & Awareness of change within a visual scene only occurs in subjects were aware of, replicated those attentional effects, but the presence of focused attention. When two versions of a.
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  21.  59
    An Implicit Measure of Undetected Change.Ian Thornton & Diego Fernandez-Duque - 2000 - Spatial Vision 14 (1):21-44.
    b>—Several paradigms (e.g. change blindness, inattentional blindness, transsaccadic integra- tion) indicate that observers are often very poor at reporting changes to their visual environment. Such evidence has been used to suggest that the spatio-temporal coherence needed to represent change can only occur in the presence of focused attention. However, those studies almost always rely on explicit reports. It remains a possibility that the visual system can implicitly detect change, but that in the absence of focused attention, the change does not (...)
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  22.  98
    Why the Idea of Framework Propositions Cannot Contribute to an Understanding of Delusions.Tim Thornton - 2008 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):159-175.
    One of the tasks that recent philosophy of psychiatry has taken upon itself is to extend the range of understanding to some of those aspects of psychopathology that Jaspers deemed beyond its limits. Given the fundamental difficulties of offering a literal interpretation of the contents of primary delusions, a number of alternative strategies have been put forward including regarding them as abnormal versions of framework propositions described by Wittgenstein in On Certainty. But although framework propositions share some of the apparent (...)
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  23. Solipsism and the Problem of Other Minds.Stephen P. Thornton - 2004 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  24. Silence on Gays and Lesbians in Social Studies Curriculum.Stephen J. Thornton - 2008 - In David J. Flinders & Stephen J. Thornton (eds.), The Curriculum Studies Reader. Routledge.
  25.  60
    Wittgenstein and the Limits of Empathic Understanding in Psychopathology.Tim Thornton - 2004 - International Review of Psychiatry.
    Summary The aim of this paper is three-fold. Firstly, to briefly set out how strategic choices made about theorising about intentionality or content have actions at a distance for accounting for delusion. Secondly, to investigate how successfully a general difficulty facing a broadly interpretative approach to delusions might be eased by the application of any of three Wittgensteinian interpretative tools. Thirdly, to draw a general moral about how the later Wittgenstein gives more reason to be pessimistic than optimistic about the (...)
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  26.  34
    Converging Evidence for the Detection of Change Without Awareness.Ian Thornton & Diego Fernandez-Duque - 2002 - Progress in Brain Research.
  27.  78
    Thought Insertion, Cognitivism, and Inner Space.Tim Thornton - 2002 - Cognitive Neuropsychiatry.
    Introduction. Whatever its underlying causes, even the description of the phenomenon of thought insertion, of the content of the delusion, presents difficulty. It may seem that the best hope of a description comes from a broadly cognitivist approach to the mind which construes content-laden mental states as internal mental representations within what is literally an inner space: the space of the brain or nervous system. Such an approach objectifies thoughts in a way which might seem to hold out the prospect (...)
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  28. Double Brain, Double Person?M. Thornton - 1994 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (2):761-763.
  29. Locke's Criticism of Wittgenstein.M. T. Thornton - 1969 - Philosophical Quarterly 19 (76):266-271.
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  30.  36
    Explicit Mechanisms Do Not Account for Implicit Localization and Identification of Change: An Empirical Reply to Mitroff Et Al (2000).Diego Fernandez-Duque & Ian Thornton - 2003 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (5).
    Several recent findings support the notion that changes in the environment can be implicitly represented by the visual system. S. R. Mitroff, D. J. Simons, and S. L. Franconeri (2002) challenged this view and proposed alternative interpretations based on explicit strategies. Across 4 experiments, the current study finds no empirical support for such alternative proposals. Experiment 1 shows that subjects do not rely on unchanged items when locating an unaware change. Experiments 2 and 3 show that unaware changes affect performance (...)
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  31. Determinism and Moral Reactive Attitudes.J. C. Thornton - 1969 - Ethics 79 (July):283-297.
  32.  38
    Aristotelian Practical Reason.M. T. Thornton - 1982 - Mind 91 (361):57-76.
  33. Brave Mobots Use Representation: Emergence of Representation in Fight-or-Flight Learning. [REVIEW]Chris Thornton - 1997 - Minds and Machines 7 (4):475-494.
    The paper uses ideas from Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence and Genetic Algorithms to provide a model of the development of a fight-or-flight response in a simulated agent. The modelled development process involves (simulated) processes of evolution, learning and representation development. The main value of the model is that it provides an illustration of how simple learning processes may lead to the formation of structures which can be given a representational interpretation. It also shows how these may form the infrastructure for (...)
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  34. Sigmund Freud.Stephen P. Thornton - 2001 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  35.  86
    Reasons and Causes in Philosophy and Psychopathology.Tim Thornton - 1997 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (4):307-317.
    This paper examines the account offered by Bolton and Hill (1996) of how reasons can be causes, and thus how symptoms of mental disorders can be both caused and carry meaning. The central problem is to reconcile the causal and rationalizing powers of content-laden mental states. I draw out these two aspects by putting them in the context of recent work in analytical philosophy, including Davidson's token identity theory and his account of mental disorder. The latter, however, can be used (...)
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  36.  25
    Reductionism / Anti-Reductionism.Tim Thornton - 2004 - In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 191.
  37.  26
    Facing Up to Feuerbach.Stephen P. Thornton - 1996 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 39 (2):103 - 120.
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  38.  89
    Relational Learning Re-Examined.Chris Thornton & Andy Clark - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):83-83.
    We argue that existing learning algorithms are often poorly equipped to solve problems involving a certain type of important and widespread regularity that we call “type-2 regularity.” The solution in these cases is to trade achieved representation against computational search. We investigate several ways in which such a trade-off may be pursued including simple incremental learning, modular connectionism, and the developmental hypothesis of “representational redescription.”.
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  39.  53
    Ostensive Terms and Materialism.Mark T. Thornton - 1972 - The Monist 56 (April):193-214.
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  40. Plagues of the Mind: The New Epidemic of False Knowledge.Bruce S. Thornton - 1999 - Isi Books.
  41.  11
    The Disappearing Media Ethics Debate in Letters to the Editor.Brian Thornton - 1998 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 13 (1):40 – 55.
    How many letters to the editor published in today's popular magazines discuss media ethics? How do the number of letters to the editor about media ethics compare with lettersfrom an earlier era? To find some answers, this article compares the number of letters to the editor about journalistic standards contained in all the letters published in 10 popular magazines between 1982 and 1992 with those of 10 popular magazines published between 1902 and 1912. Of almost 42,000 letters to the editor (...)
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  42. Do We Have Free Will?Mark T. Thornton - 1990 - St.
     
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  43.  44
    Intention, Rule Following and the Strategic Role of Wright’s Order of Determination Test.Tim Thornton - 1997 - Philosophical Investigations 20 (2):136–151.
    I believe that Wright’s constructivist account of intention is funda- mentally flawed [Wright 1984, 1986, 1987a, 1987b, 1988, 1989a, 1989b, 1991, 1992]. To understand why it fails it is necessary first to locate the account in its broader strategic context. That context is Wright’s response to Wittgenstein’s account of rule following. When so located the diagnosis of the account’s failure is clear. Wright’s account of intention is a species of the interpretative approach to mental content which is explicitly rejected by (...)
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  44.  15
    Scientific Entities II.J. B. Thornton - 1953 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):73 – 100.
  45.  18
    Scientific Entities I.J. B. Thornton - 1953 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):1 – 21.
  46.  25
    Hare's View of Morality.M. T. Thornton - 1971 - Mind 80 (320):617-619.
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  47.  24
    Reading the Generalizer's Mind.Chris Thornton & Andy Clark - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):308-310.
    In his new commentary, Damper re-emphasises his claim that parity is not a generalisation problem. But when proper account is taken of the arguments he puts forward, we find that the proposed conclusion is not the only one that can be drawn.
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  48.  5
    Tarsie: Design and Designers.M. J. Thornton - 1973 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 36:377-382.
  49. Folk Psychology: An Introduction.Mark Thornton - 1989 - Published by Canadian Philosophical Monographs for the Canadian Association for Publishing in Philosophy.
  50. The Problem of Liberalism in the Thought of John Stuart Mill.Neil Thornton - 1987 - Garland.
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