10 found
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  1.  48
    On Agency and Body-Ownership: Phenomenological and Neurocognitive Reflections.Manos Tsakiris, Simone Schütz-Bosbach & Shaun Gallagher - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (3):645-660.
    The recent distinction between sense of agency and sense of body-ownership has attracted considerable empirical and theoretical interest. The respective contributions of central motor signals and peripheral afferent signals to these two varieties of body experience remain unknown. In the present review, we consider the methodological problems encountered in the empirical study of agency and body-ownership, and we then present a series of experiments that study the interplay between motor and sensory information. In particular, we focus on how multisensory signals (...)
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  2.  41
    Perceptual Resonance: Action-Induced Modulation of Perception.Simone Schütz-Bosbach & Wolfgang Prinz - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (8):349-355.
  3.  12
    Towards a Common Framework of Grounded Action Cognition: Relating Motor Control, Perception and Cognition.Antje Gentsch, Arne Weber, Matthis Synofzik, Gottfried Vosgerau & Simone Schütz-Bosbach - 2016 - Cognition 146:81-89.
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  4.  31
    The Self in Action Effects: Selective Attenuation of Self-Generated Sounds.Carmen Weiss, Arvid Herwig & Simone Schütz-Bosbach - 2011 - Cognition 121 (2):207-218.
  5.  19
    Touchant-Touché: The Role of Self-Touch in the Representation of Body Structure.Simone Schütz-Bosbach, Jason Jiri Musil & Patrick Haggard - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):2-11.
    The “body image” is a putative mental representation of one’s own body, including structural and geometric details, as well as the more familiar visual and affective aspects. Very little research has investigated how we learn the structure of our own body, with most researchers emphasising the canonical visual representation of the body when we look at ourselves in a mirror. Here, we used non-visual self-touch in healthy participants to investigate the possibility that primary sensorimotor experience may influence cognitive representations of (...)
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  6.  61
    Vicarious Action Preparation Does Not Result in Sensory Attenuation of Auditory Action Effects.Carmen Weiss & Simone Schütz-Bosbach - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (4):1654-1661.
    The perception of sensory effects generated by one’s own actions is typically attenuated compared to the same effects generated externally. However, it is unclear whether this specifically relates to self-generation. Recent studies showed that sensory attenuation mainly relies on action preparation, not actual action execution. Hence, an attenuation of sensory effects generated by another person might occur if these actions can be anticipated and thus be prepared for.Here, we compared the perceived loudness of sounds generated by one’s own actions and (...)
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  7.  7
    Minimizing Motor Mimicry by Myself: Self-Focus Enhances Online Action-Control Mechanisms During Motor Contagion.Stephanie Spengler, Marcel Brass, Simone Kühn & Simone Schütz-Bosbach - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):98-106.
    Ideomotor theory of human action control proposes that activation of a motor representation can occur either through internally-intended or externally-perceived actions. Critically, sometimes these alternatives of eliciting a motor response may be conflicting, for example, when intending one action and perceiving another, necessitating the recruitment of enhanced action-control to avoid motor mimicry. Based on previous neuroimaging evidence, suggesting that reduced mimicry is associated with self-related processing, we aimed to experimentally enhance these action-control mechanisms during motor contagion by inducing self-focus. In (...)
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  8.  28
    Empathy: The Role of Expectations.Sabrina Trapp, Simone Schütz-Bosbach & Moshe Bar - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (2):161-166.
    To what extent can we feel what someone else feels? Data from neuroscience suggest that empathy is supported by a simulation process, namely the neural activation of the same or similar regions that subserve the representation of specific states in the observer. However, expectations significantly modulate sensory input, including affective information. For example, expecting painful stimulation can decrease the neural signal and the subjective experience thereof. For an accurate representation of the other person’s state, such top-down processes would have to (...)
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  9.  15
    Detection of Visual–Tactile Contingency in the First Year After Birth.Norbert Zmyj, Jana Jank, Simone Schütz-Bosbach & Moritz M. Daum - 2011 - Cognition 120 (1):82-89.
  10.  7
    The Interaction Between Interoceptive and Action States Within a Framework of Predictive Coding.Amanda C. Marshall, Antje Gentsch & Simone Schütz-Bosbach - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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