14 found
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  1.  28
    God, Simplicity, and the Consolatio Philosophiae.Siobhan Nash-Marshall - 2004 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (2):225-246.
    One of the primary concerns of the Consolatio is to draw out many of the paradoxical conclusions concerning the relation between creation and God that stem from the premises of classical creationist metaphysics, and attempt to solve them. Once one accepts that God does exist, is omnipotent, omniscient, and simple, it becomes viciously difficult to explain: (1) how anything contrary to God’s will—evil—can exist; (2) how any cause can act independently of God’s will—human freedom; and (3) how “independent causes” can (...)
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  2.  47
    Saint Anselm and the Problem of Evil, or On Freeing Evil From the “Problem of Evil”.Siobhan Nash-Marshall - 2012 - International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (4):455-470.
    This article addresses one of the crucial metaphysical presuppositions of the contemporary problem of evil: the belief that evil is that which a good thing must eliminate, or to be more precise, that evil is that which God must eliminate. The first part analyzes J. L. Mackie’s atheological argument in “Evil and Omnipotence.” The second part analyzes the reasons why Saint Anselm rejected the claim that God must eliminate evil in his De Casu Diaboli. The article’s goal is not just (...)
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  3.  38
    Lies, Damned Lies, and Genocide.Siobhan Nash-Marshall & Rita Mahdessian - 2013 - Metaphilosophy 44 (1-2):116-144.
    This article analyzes the claim that “deliberate denial [of genocide] is a form of aggression that ought to be regarded as a contribution to genocidal violence in its own right.” Its objective is to demonstrate that the claim is substantially correct: there are instances of genocide negation that are genocidal acts. The article suggests that one such instance is contained in a letter sent to Professor Robert Jay Lifton by Turkey's ambassador to the United States. The article is divided into (...)
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  4.  20
    Personalist Papers.Siobhan Nash-Marshall - 2006 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (2):295-298.
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  5.  33
    The Intellect, Receptivity, and Material Singulars in Aquinas.Siobhan Nash-Marshall - 2002 - International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (3):371-388.
    Intellectual receptivity is both the prerequisite for objective human knowledge and the condition of possibility for all human knowledge. My arguments are cast in Thomistic terms. In the first part, I review the most important arguments with which Aquinas defends the receptivity of the human intellect, especially the argument from intellectual media and the argument from actualization. In the second part, I attempt to resolve the apparent contradictions involved in the claim that the intellect is receptive, contradictions that stem from (...)
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  6.  29
    The Problem of Evil.Siobhan Nash-Marshall - 2009 - International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (2):265-267.
  7.  27
    The Prisoner’s Philosophy.Siobhan Nash-Marshall - 2009 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (4):634-636.
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  8.  19
    Introduction.Siobhan Nash-Marshall - 2004 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (2):175-179.
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  9.  12
    Is Evil Really an Ontological.Siobhan Nash-Marshall - 2005 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 79:157-171.
    This paper regards the plausibility of rejecting the scholastic claim that the “good” is a transcendental property of being—that ens et bonum convertuntur—onthe basis of two claims: Stephen Cahn’s claim that evil worlds created by an evil God are intrinsically plausible—i.e., that it is plausible to think of evil as a positive and instantiable property; and the claim that “evil is a primitive”—that is, that evil is a primary or basic ontological property. It argues that if an “ontological primitive” must (...)
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  10.  15
    Sandra Visser and Thomas Williams, Anselm.(Great Medieval Thinkers.) Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. Pp. Xii, 303. $99 (Cloth); $29.95 (Paper). [REVIEW]Siobhan Nash-Marshall - 2010 - Speculum 85 (3):748-748.
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  11.  18
    Is Evil Really an Ontological "Primitive"?Siobhan Nash-Marshall - 2005 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 79:157-171.
    This paper regards the plausibility of rejecting the scholastic claim that the “good” is a transcendental property of being—that ens et bonum convertuntur—onthe basis of two claims: (1) Stephen Cahn’s claim that evil worlds created by an evil God are intrinsically plausible—i.e., that it is plausible to think of evil as a positive and instantiable property; and (2) the claim that “evil is a primitive”—that is, that evil is a primary or basic ontological property. It argues that if an “ontological (...)
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  12.  7
    The Problem of Evil. By Daniel Speak.Siobhan Nash-Marshall - 2015 - International Philosophical Quarterly 55 (4):519-520.
  13.  12
    3. On the Fate of Nations.Siobhan Nash-Marshall - 2001 - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España] 4 (2).
    If nations are sacred, then there is no warranting our having drawn the map of the Middle East to suit our needs rather than those of the peoples who populate those lands. If we have the right to draw world maps to suit our needs rather than those of the peoples who populate those lands, on the other hand, then there is no warranting the claim that nations are sacred. If patriotism is love of one’s nation, then patriotism’s being a (...)
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  14. Augustine and Social Justice.Mary T. Clark, Aaron Conley, María Teresa Dávila, Mark Doorley, Todd French, J. Burton Fulmer, Jennifer Herdt, Rodolfo Hernandez-Diaz, John Kiess, Matthew J. Pereira, Siobhan Nash-Marshall, Edmund N. Santurri, George Schmidt, Sarah Stewart-Kroeker, Sergey Trostyanskiy, Darlene Weaver & William Werpehowski - 2015 - Lexington Books.
    This volume examines some of the most contentious social justice issues present in the corpus of Augustine's writings. Whether one is concerned with human trafficking and the contemporary slave trade, the global economy, or endless wars, these essays further the conversation on social justice as informed by the writings of Augustine of Hippo.
     
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