Results for 'Social Sciences, general'

988 found
Order:
  1.  20
    The Double-Edged Helix: Social Implications of Genetics in a Diverse Society.Joseph S. Alper, Catherine Ard, Adrienne Asch, Peter Conrad, Jon Beckwith, American Cancer Society Research Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics Jon Beckwith, Harry Coplan Professor of Social Sciences Peter Conrad & Lisa N. Geller - 2002
    The rapidly changing field of genetics affects society through advances in health-care and through implications of genetic research. This study addresses the impacts of new genetic discoveries and technologies on different segments of today's society. The book begins with a chapter on genetic complexity, and subsequent chapters discuss moral and ethical questions arising from today's genetics from the perspectives of health care professionals, the media, the general public, special interest groups and commercial interests.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  40
    Ideology, social science and general facts in late eighteenth-century French political thought.Michael Sonenscher - 2009 - History of European Ideas 35 (1):24-37.
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau's attack on the natural jurisprudence of Grotius, Hobbes and Pufendorf is well known. But what happened to modern natural jurisprudence after Rousseau not very well known. The aim of this article is to try to show how and why it turned into what Emmanuel-Joseph Sieyès called “social science” and the bearing that this Rousseau-inspired transformation has on making sense of ideology, or the moral and political thought of the late eighteenth-century French ideologues.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  88
    On the scope and limits of generalizations in the social sciences.Daniel Little - 1993 - Synthese 97 (2):183 - 207.
    This article disputes the common view that social science explanations depend on discovery of lawlike generalizations from which descriptions of social outcomes can be derived. It distinguishes between governing and phenomenal regularities, and argues that social regularities are phenomenal rather than governing. In place of nomological deductive arguments, the article maintains that social explanations depend on the discovery of causal mechanisms underlying various social processes. The metaphysical correlate of this argument is that there are no (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  4.  8
    The social sciences in a global age: decoding knowledge politics.Dipankar Sinha - 2021 - New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
    The book focuses on the status and role of social sciences in the current millennium. It critically examines the key debates on the social sciences and focuses on their ir/relevance in our times, especially in background of the changing state-market dialectics. It scrutinises knowledge politics of the global times by exploring how the neoliberal project aligns and fuses steep economic 'conditionalities' with professional cultural parameters of higher academia in order to constrain autonomy and weaken radical expressions in (...) science pedagogy and research. Asserting that the humanistic core of social sciences has the potential to resist acts of reducing knowledge to a monochromatic form the book argues that social science stream can challenge and resist such hegemonic ambitions. It also identifies and analyses the contradictions, dilemmas, predicaments and false steps of social scientists and avoids a reductive approach based on the 'west versus non-west' binary. The volume will be of interest to scholars and researchers of the social sciences in general, and in the sociology/politics of knowledge, political theory, political sociology, and education in particular. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  9
    Rethinking interdisciplinarity across the social sciences and neurosciences.Felicity Callard - 2015 - New York, NY: Palgrave-Macmillan. Edited by Des Fitzgerald.
    This book offers a provocative account of interdisciplinary research across the neurosciences, social sciences and humanities. Setting itself against standard accounts of interdisciplinary 'integration,' and rooting itself in the authors' own experiences, the book establishes a radical agenda for collaboration across these disciplines. Rethinking Interdisciplinarity does not merely advocate interdisciplinary research, but attends to the hitherto tacit pragmatics, affects, power dynamics, and spatial logics in which that research is enfolded. Understanding the complex relationships between brains, minds, and environments requires (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  6.  88
    Why Social Science is Biological Science.Alex Rosenberg - 2017 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 48 (3):341-369.
    The social sciences need to take seriously their status as divisions of biology. As such they need to recognize the central role of Darwinian processes in all the phenomena they seek to explain. An argument for this claim is formulated in terms of a small number of relatively precise premises that focus on the nature of the kinds and taxonomies of all the social sciences. The analytical taxonomies of all the social sciences are shown to require a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  16
    Ethics, The Social Sciences, and Policy Analysis.Daniel Callahan, Sidney Callahan, Bruce Jennings & Director of Bioethics Bruce Jennings - 1983 - Springer.
    The social sciences playa variety of multifaceted roles in the policymaking process. So varied are these roles, indeed, that it is futile to talk in the singular about the use of social science in policymaking, as if there were one constant relationship between two fixed and stable entities. Instead, to address this issue sensibly one must talk in the plural about uses of dif ferent modes of social scientific inquiry for different kinds of policies under various circumstances. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  8. Generalization: Conceptions in the social sciences.T. D. Cook - 2001 - In Neil J. Smelser & Paul B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Elsevier. pp. 6037--43.
  9.  53
    Philosophical Foundations of the Social Sciences: Analyzing Controversies in Social Research.Harold Kincaid - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    This 1996 book defends the prospects for a science of society. It argues that behind the diverse methods of the natural sciences lies a common core of scientific rationality that the social sciences can and sometimes do achieve. It also argues that good social science must be in part about large-scale social structures and processes and thus that methodological individualism is misguided. These theses are supported by a detailed discussion of actual social research, including theories of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  10.  23
    The social sciences in the looking glass: studies in the production of knowledge.Didier Fassin & George Steinmetz (eds.) - 2023 - Durham: Duke University Press.
    In recent years, social scientists have turned their critical lens on the historical roots and contours of their disciplines, including their politics and practices, epistemologies and methods, institutionalization and professionalization, national development and colonial expansion, globalization and local contestations, and their public presence and role in society. The Social Sciences in the Looking Glass offers current social scientific perspectives on this reflexive moment in the social sciences. Examining sociology, anthropology, philosophy, political science, legal theory, and religious (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  12
    Social Science as a Kind of Writing.Rafe McGregor & Reece Burns - 2024 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 24 (70):97-112.
    The purpose of this paper is twofold: to argue for the value of (1) social science as part of the intellectual activity of writing (rather than righting) and (2) the practice of fiction to that intellectual activity. Writing is a mode of representation that eludes our complete and objective knowledge and always remains partial and temporary. While righting, in contrast, is concerned with the absolute truth and the revelation of the right answer. This paper argues that writing is a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Social Science as a Guide to Social Metaphysics?Katherine Hawley - 2018 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 49 (2):187-198.
    If we are sympathetic to the project of naturalising metaphysics, how should we approach the metaphysics of the social world? What role can the social sciences play in metaphysical investigation? In the light of these questions, this paper examines three possible approaches to social metaphysics: inference to the best explanation from current social science, conceptual analysis, and Haslanger-inspired ameliorative projects.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  13.  31
    Typification in Society and Social Science: The Continuing Relevance of Schutz’s Social Phenomenology.Kwang-ki Kim & Tim Berard - 2009 - Human Studies 32 (3):263-289.
    This paper examines Alfred Schutz’s insights on types and typification. Beginning with a brief overview of the history and meaning of typification in interpretive sociology, the paper further addresses both the ubiquity and the necessity of typification in social life and scientific method. Schutz’s contribution itself is lacking in empirical application and grounding, but examples are provided of ongoing empirical research which advances the understanding of types and typification. As is suggested by illustrations from scholarship in the social (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  14.  20
    Humanities and social sciences (HSS) and the challenges posed by AI: a French point of view.Laurent Petit - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-7.
    The humanities and social sciences (HSS) are being turned upside down by advances in artificial intelligence (AI), and their very existence could be threatened. These sciences are being profoundly destabilised by a dual process of naturalisation of social phenomena and fetishisation of numbers, accentuated by the development of AI (part 1). Both STM (science, technology, medicine) and HSS are facing major epistemological challenges, but for the latter they carry the risk of marginalisation (part 2). The humanities and (...) sciences remain the best equipped to question the social construct represented by the development of AI. However, this essential approach is not enough. We need to ask ourselves: how can the HSS reintroduce interpretation when they have less and less control over how data is put together? Only a balanced partnership between STM and HSS is likely to meet all these challenges (part 3). Using the case of education, which has long been at the forefront of developments in other sectors of social life, we would like to show how and on what priority issues such a partnership can be built (part 4). (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  24
    The Generality of Theory and the Specificity of Social Behavior: Contrasting Experimental and Hermeneutic Social Science.Edwin E. Gantt, Jeffrey P. Lindstrom & Richard N. Williams - 2016 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (4).
    Since its inception, experimental social psychology has arguably been of two minds about the nature and role of theory. Contemporary social psychology's experimental approach has been strongly informed by the “nomological-deductive” approach of Carl Hempel in tandem with the “hypothetico-deducive” approach of Karl Popper. Social psychology's commitment to this hybrid model of science has produced at least two serious obstacles to more fruitful theorizing about human experience: the problem of situational specificity, and the manifest impossibility of formulating (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  16.  27
    Social science and social engineering.Philip M. Hauser - 1949 - Philosophy of Science 16 (3):209-218.
    There should be no disagreement with the proposal for research into the role of applied social science in the formation of policy. The relation between social science and the formation of social policy and social action is, in fact, one of the more important areas of study in the general field of social control. The outline for research prepared by Mr. Merton constitutes a good framework for the investigation of important aspects of the relationship (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  24
    The Generality of Theory and the Specificity of Social Behavior: Contrasting Experimental and Hermeneutic Social Science.Edwin E. Gantt, Jeffrey P. Lindstrom & Richard N. Williams - 2017 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 47 (2):130-153.
    Since its inception, experimental social psychology has arguably been of two minds about the nature and role of theory. Contemporary social psychology's experimental approach has been strongly informed by the “nomological-deductive” approach of Carl Hempel in tandem with the “hypothetico-deducive” approach of Karl Popper. Social psychology's commitment to this hybrid model of science has produced at least two serious obstacles to more fruitful theorizing about human experience: the problem of situational specificity, and the manifest impossibility of formulating (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18.  10
    Structuralism in Social Science: Obsolete or Promising?Josef Menšík - 2019 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 40 (2):133-156.
    The approach of structuralism came to philosophy from social science. It was also in social science where, in 1950–1970s, in the form of the French structuralism, the approach gained its widest recognition. Since then, however, the approach fell out of favour in social science. Recently, structuralism is gaining currency in the philosophy of mathematics. After ascertaining that the two structuralisms indeed share a common core, the question stands whether general structuralism could not find its way back (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  23
    Laws in the social sciences.Catherine Greene - 2017 - Dissertation, London School of Economics and Political Science
    The social sciences are often thought to be inferior to the natural sciences because they do not have laws. Bohman writes that “the social sciences have never achieved much in the way of predictive general laws—the hallmark of naturalistic knowledge—and so have often been denied the honorific status of ‘sciences’” (1994, pg. vii). Philosophers have suggested a number of reasons for the dearth of laws in the social sciences, including the frequent use of ceteris paribus conditions (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  9
    The Concept of the Social in Uniting the Humanities and Social Sciences.Michael E. Brown - 2014 - Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
    In this book, Michael Brown provides original and critical analysis of the state of the social sciences and the humanities. He examines the different disciplines that address human affairs--from sociology, philosophy, political science, and anthropology to the humanities in general--to understand their common ground. He probes the ways in which we investigate the meaning of individuality in a society for which individuals are not the agents of the activities in which they participate, and he develops a critical method (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  6
    Directions for the Development of Social Sciences and Humanities in the Context of Creating Artificial General Intelligence.Андреас Хачатурович Мариносян - 2024 - Russian Journal of Philosophical Sciences 66 (4):26-51.
    The article explores the transformative impact on human and social sciences in response to anticipated societal shifts driven by the forthcoming proliferation of artificial systems, whose intelligence will match human capabilities. Initially, it was posited that artificial intelligence (AI) would excel beyond human abilities in computational tasks and algorithmic operations, leaving creativity and humanities as uniquely human domains. However, recent advancements in large language models have significantly challenged these conventional beliefs about AI’s limitations and strengths. It is projected that, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  36
    AI and the Social Sciences: Why all variables are not created equal.Catherine Greene - 2022 - Res Publica 1:1-17.
    This article argues that it is far from trivial to convert social science concepts into accurate categories on which algorithms work best. The literature raises this concern in a general way; for example, Deeks notes that legal concepts, such as proportionality, cannot be easily converted into code noting that ‘The meaning and application of these concepts is hotly debated, even among lawyers who share common vocabularies and experiences’ (Deeks in Va Law Rev 104, pp. 1529–1593, 2018). The example (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  52
    It is not evolutionary models, but models in general that social science needs.Bruce Bridgeman - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):351-352.
    Mathematical models are potentially as useful for culture as for evolution, but cultural models must have different designs from genetic models. Social sciences must borrow from biology the idea of modeling, rather than the structure of models, because copying the product is fundamentally different from copying the design. Transfer of most cultural information from brains to artificial media increases the differences between cultural and biological information. (Published Online November 9 2006).
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  24.  10
    Philosophy and social science.Antony Grayling, Andrew Pyle & Naomi Goulder - 2006 - In A. C. Grayling, Andrew Pyle & Naomi Goulder (eds.), The Continuum encyclopedia of British philosophy. Bristol: Thoemmes Continuum.
    The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy" employs a wide construal of 'philosophy' that was common in former centuries. Its biographical entries include writers on mainstream philosophical topics whose individual contribution was small (for example, writers of textbooks or minor critics of major figures). But the encyclopedia also includes celebrated figures from other intellectual domains (e.g. poets, mathematicians, scientists and clergymen), who had something to say on topics that count as broadly philosophical. This interdisciplinary approach, coupled with sophisticated indexing and cross-referencing, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  18
    Philosophy and Social Science: Introducing Bourdieu and Passeron.Louis Althusser - 2019 - Theory, Culture and Society 36 (7-8):5-21.
    This text derives from a recording, and transcripts, of the introduction which Althusser gave on 6 December 1963, to a seminar for students in the École Normale Supérieure, Paris, offered at his invitation by Pierre Bourdieu and Jean-Claude Passeron. Althusser takes the opportunity to raise questions about the status of social science and suggests that Bourdieu and Passeron represent slightly different strands of contemporary research practice, partly as a result of their different formation and practice since themselves leaving the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  41
    A Secular Alchemy of Social Science: The Denial of Jewish Messianism in Freud and Durkheim.Philip Wexler - 2008 - Theoria: A Journal of Social and Political Theory 55 (116):1-21.
    This essay presents a reading of the work of two central figures of modern social theory that locates their work within not simply mainstream Jewish thought, but a particular Hasidic tradition. Further, I argue that lying behind this, in a repressed form, is an even older tradition of Jewish alchemy. I make no claim to have evidence that either Freud or Durkheim were directly influenced by Hasidism or alchemy, but I examine the parallels between the structure of their thoughts (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  9
    The Interrelation of Phenomenology, Social Sciences and the Arts.Michael Barber & Jochen Dreher (eds.) - 2014 - Cham: Imprint: Springer.
    This book features papers written by renowned international scholars that analyze the interdependence of art, phenomenology, and social science. The papers show how the analysis of the production as well as the perception and interpretation of art work needs to take into consideration the subjective viewpoint of the artist in addition to that of the interpreter. Phenomenology allows a description of the subjectively centered life-world of the individual actor-artist or interpreter-and the objective structures of literature, music, and the aesthetic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28.  33
    The Role of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Nanotechnology Research and Development.Mette Ebbesen - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (3):333-333.
    The experience with genetically modified foods has been prominent in motivating science, industry and regulatory bodies to address the social and ethical dimensions of nanotechnology. The overall objective is to gain the general public’s acceptance of nanotechnology in order not to provoke a consumer boycott as it happened with genetically modified foods. It is stated implicitly in reports on nanotechnology research and development that this acceptance depends on the public’s confidence in the technology and that the confidence is (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  29.  33
    Fundamental Issues in Social Science.Jan-Erik Lane - 2023 - Open Journal of Philosophy 13 (1):104-111.
    Philosophy of science pays meagre attention to the social sciences and humanities. It deals with basic questions in the natural sciences like Hempel, or general epistemology like e.g. Putnam and Kripke. Popper is the main exception.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  4
    Pragmatism and the Social Sciences.Roberto Frega & Filipe Carreira da Silva - 2012 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 4 (1).
    This issue continues the symposia on Pragmatism and the Social Sciences: A Century of Influences and Interactions that has appeared in the vol. 2, year 2011 of this journal. For a general introduction to the issue we refer readers to our Editor’s introduction to the volume 1. This new issue, inspired by the same criteria used in the making of the first, is divided in three sections. In the first section, titled “Classical Pragmatists and contemporary sociology” contains three (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  70
    Ethics and social science: Which kind of co-operation? [REVIEW]Dieter Birnbacher - 1999 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 2 (4):319-336.
    The relation between ethics and social science is often conceived as complementary, both disciplines cooperating in the solution of concrete moral problems. Against this, the paper argues that not only applied ethics but even certain parts of general ethics have to incorporate sociological and psychological data and theories from the start. Applied ethics depends on social science in order to asses the impact of its own principles on the concrete realities which these principles are to regulate as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   60 citations  
  32.  25
    Of Politics and Social Science.Peter Baehr - 2004 - European Journal of Political Theory 3 (2):191-217.
    During the late 1940s and early 1950s, David Riesman and Hannah Arendt were engaged in an animated discussion about the meaning and character of totalitarianism. Their disagreement reflected, in part, different experiences and dissonant intellectual backgrounds. Arendt abhorred the social sciences, finding them pretentious and obfuscating. Riesman, in contrast, abandoned a career in law to take up the sociological vocation, which he combined with his own heterodox brand of humanistic psychology. This article delineates the stakes of the Arendt Riesman (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  12
    AI and the Social Sciences: Why All Variables are Not Created Equal.Catherine Greene - 2023 - Res Publica 29 (2):303-319.
    This article argues that it is far from trivial to convert social science concepts into accurate categories on which algorithms work best. The literature raises this concern in a general way; for example, Deeks notes that legal concepts, such as proportionality, cannot be easily converted into code noting that ‘The meaning and application of these concepts is hotly debated, even among lawyers who share common vocabularies and experiences’ (Deeks in Va Law Rev 104, pp. 1529–1593, 2018). The example (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  43
    Evolutionary social science beyond culture.Harold Kincaid - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):356-356.
    Mesoudi et al.'s case can be improved by expanding to compelling selectionist explanations elsewhere in the social sciences and by seeing that natural selection is an instance of general selectionist process. Obstacles include the common use of extreme idealizations and optimality evidence, the copresence of nonselectionist social processes, and the fact that selectionist explanations often presuppose other kinds of social explanations. (Published Online November 9 2006).
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  35.  45
    Religious conversion, philosophy, and social science.Oliver Thomas Spinney - 2023 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 94 (2):139-149.
    I argue that empirical studies into the phenomenon of religious conversion suffer from conceptual unclarity owing to an absence of philosophical contributions. I examine the relationship between definition and empirical result in the social sciences, and I show that a wide divergence in conceptual approach threatens to undermine the possibility of useful comparative study. I stake out a distinctive role for philosophical treatments of studies into religious conversion. I conclude with the suggestion that use of the terms ‘convert’ and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Descriptive-causal generalizations : "empirical laws" in the social sciences?Gary Goertz - 2012 - In Harold Kincaid (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Social Science. Oxford University Press.
  37. Philosophies of social science: the classic and contemporary readings.Gerard Delanty & Piet Strydom (eds.) - 2003 - Phildelphia: Open University.
    “This book will certainly prove to be a useful resource and reference point … a good addition to anyone’s bookshelf.” Network "This is a superb collection, expertly presented. The overall conception seems splendid, giving an excellent sense of the issues... The selection and length of the readings is admirably judged, with both the classic texts and the few unpublished pieces making just the right points." William Outhwaite, Professor of Sociology, University of Sussex "... an indispensable book for all of us (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38. Philosophy of Social Science in a nutshell: from discourse to model and experiment.Michel Dubois & Denis Phan - 2007 - In Denis Phan & Phan Amblard (eds.), Agent Based Modelling and Simulations in the Human and Social Siences. Oxford: The Bardwell Press. pp. 393-431.
    The debates on the scientificity of social sciences in general, and sociology in particular, are recurring. From the original methodenstreitat the end the 19th Century to the contemporary controversy on the legitimacy of “regional epistemologies”, a same set of interrogations reappears. Are social sciences really scientific? And if so, are they sciences like other sciences? How should we conceive “research programs” Lakatos (1978) or “research traditions” for Laudan (1977) able to produce advancement of knowledge in the field (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  8
    Cognitive Relativism and Social Science.Diederick Raven, Lieteke Van Vucht Tijssen & Jan De Wolf - 1992 - Transaction Publishers.
    Modern epistomology has been dominated by an empiricist theory of knowledge that assumes a direct individualistic relationship between the knowing subject and the object of knowledge. Truth is held to be universal, and non-individualistic social and cultural factors are considered sources of distortion of true knowledge. Since the late 1950s, this view has been challenged by a cognitive relativism asserting that what is true is socially conditioned. This volume examines the far-reaching implications of this development for the social (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  11
    “Ethics wars”: Reflections on the Antagonism between Bioethicists and Social Science Observers of Biomedicine1.Klaus Hoeyer - 2006 - Human Studies 29 (2):203-227.
    Social scientists often lament the fact that philosophically trained ethicists pay limited attention to the insights they generate. This paper presents an overview of tendencies in sociological and anthropological studies of morality, ethics and bioethics, and suggests that a lack in philosophical interest might be related to a tendency among social scientists to employ either a deficit model (social science perspectives accommodate the sense of context that philosophical ethics lacks), a replacement model (social scientists have finally (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  41. J. M. Keynes's position on the general applicability of mathematical, logical and statistical methods in economics and social science.Michael Emmett Brady - 1988 - Synthese 76 (1):1 - 24.
    The author finds no support for the claim that J. M. Keynes had severe reservations, in general, as opposed to particular, concerning the application of mathematical, logical and statistical methods in economics. These misinterpretations rest on the omission of important source material as well as a severe misconstrual ofThe Treatise on Probability (1921).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  10
    Action in History and Social Science.Daniel Little - 2010 - In Timothy O'Connor & Constantine Sandis (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Action. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 401–409.
    This chapter contains sections titled: References.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  25
    Social desire paths: a new theoretical concept to increase the usability of social science research in society.Laura Nichols - 2014 - Theory and Society 43 (6):647-665.
    Social scientists are well-trained to observe and chart social trends, but less experienced at presenting scientific findings in formats that can inform social change work. In this article, I propose a new theoretical concept that provides a mechanism by which social science research can be more effectively applied for proactive policy, organizational, and program development. The approach is to use the metaphor of “desire paths” from landscape architecture to show how social scientists can identify and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  14
    Semantic network analysis in social sciences.Elad Segev (ed.) - 2022 - London: Routledge.
    Semantic Network Analysis in Social Sciences introduces the fundamentals of semantic network analysis and its applications in the social sciences. Readers learn how to easily transform any given text into a visual network of words co-occurring together, a process that allows mapping the main themes appearing in the text and revealing its main narratives and biases. Semantic network analysis is particularly useful today with the increasing volumes of text-based information available. It is one of the developing, cutting-edge methods (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  19
    Cultural encounters in the social sciences and humanities: western émigré scholars in Turkey.Murat Ergin - 2009 - History of the Human Sciences 22 (1):105-130.
    Turkish modernization relied on the western social sciences and humanities not only as an abstract and distant model, but also in the form of close encounters and interactions with western refugee scholars. This article examines the activities of western intellectuals and experts who visited Turkey in the early republican era (1923—50), especially focusing on a group of émigré scholars who were employed in Turkey after the university reform of 1933. While European and North American social scientists were drawn (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  52
    IV. Does a generalized Heisenberg principle operate in the social sciences?Garrison Sposito - 1969 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 12 (1-4):356-361.
    It is argued that a generalization of Heisenberg's principle of indeterminacy is possible in the social sciences. The empirical grounds for this contention lie with interference phenomena induced by transference distortions that may occur when human beings investigate the behaviour of one another.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  34
    The Idea of a Social Science and its Relation to Philosophy.Leon J. Goldstein - 1960 - Philosophical Review 69 (3):411.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   158 citations  
  48. Why the social sciences are irreducible.Tobias Hansson Wahlberg - 2019 - Synthese 196 (12):4961-4987.
    It is often claimed that the social sciences cannot be reduced to a lower-level individualistic science. The standard argument for this position is the Fodorian multiple realizability argument. Its defenders endorse token–token identities between “higher-level” social objects and pluralities/sums of “lower-level” individuals, but they maintain that the properties expressed by social science predicates are often multiply realizable, entailing that type–type identities between social and individualistic properties are ruled out. In this paper I argue that the multiple (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  49.  48
    Bringing Darwin into the social sciences and the humanities: cultural evolution and its philosophical implications.Stefaan Blancke & Gilles Denis - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):29.
    In the field of cultural evolution it is generally assumed that the study of culture and cultural change would benefit enormously from being informed by evolutionary thinking. Recently, however, there has been much debate about what this “being informed” means. According to the standard view, an interesting analogy obtains between cultural and biological evolution. In the literature, however, the analogy is interpreted and used in at least three distinct, but interrelated ways. We provide a taxonomy in order to clarify these (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  24
    Explanation in the Social Sciences with particular reference to economics.Thomas S. Torrance - unknown
    The aim of this thesis is to discuss the nature of social phenomena, and to determine the appropriate way to explain them. Many of the contentions advanced rest largely upon the fact that social phenomena can be investigated only by methods which respect their distinctive character and status as social phenomena. In chapter I it is argued that the most important difference between the social and the natural sciences is that the former have to employ intentional (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 988