Results for 'Social media'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1. Social Media Studies.Vijaya Abhinandan - manuscript
    Social media sites offer a huge data about our everyday life, thoughts, feelings and reflecting what the users want and like. Since user behavior on OSNS is a mirror image of actions in the real world, scholars have to investigate the use SM to prediction, making forecasts about our daily life. This paper provide an overview of different commonly used social media and application of their data analysis.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  48
    Social Media and Depression Symptoms: A Network Perspective.George Aalbers, Richard J. McNally, Alexandre Heeren, Sanne de Wit & Eiko I. Fried - 2019 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 148 (8):1454-1462.
  3.  48
    Using Social Media as a Research Recruitment Tool: Ethical Issues and Recommendations.Luke Gelinas, Robin Pierce, Sabune Winkler, I. Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch & Barbara E. Bierer - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (3):3-14.
    The use of social media as a recruitment tool for research with humans is increasing, and likely to continue to grow. Despite this, to date there has been no specific regulatory guidance and there has been little in the bioethics literature to guide investigators and institutional review boards faced with navigating the ethical issues such use raises. We begin to fill this gap by first defending a nonexceptionalist methodology for assessing social media recruitment; second, examining respect (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  4.  26
    Social Media and the Value of Truth.Berrin Beasley & Mitchell R. Haney - 2012 - Lexington Books.
    This volume will be of special interest to anyone concerned with modern applied ethical issues, particularly those in the areas of philosophy, communication, media studies, and journalism. This volume brings together leading experts in journalism, communication studies, and philosophy to discuss the value of truth in an age of social media.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. Social Media, Emergent Manipulation, and Political Legitimacy.Adam Pham, Alan Rubel & Clinton Castro - 2022 - In Fleur Jongepier & Michael Klenk (eds.), The Philosophy of Online Manipulation. New York: Routledge. pp. 353-369.
    Psychometrics firms such as Cambridge Analytica (CA) and troll factories such as the Internet Research Agency (IRA) have had a significant effect on democratic politics, through narrow targeting of political advertising (CA) and concerted disinformation campaigns on social media (IRA) (U.S. Department of Justice 2019; Select Committee on Intelligence, United States Senate 2019; DiResta et al. 2019). It is natural to think that such activities manipulate individuals and, hence, are wrong. Yet, as some recent cases illustrate, the moral (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  20
    Social Media and its Negative Impacts on Autonomy.Siavosh Sahebi & Paul Formosa - 2022 - Philosophy and Technology 35 (3):1-24.
    How social media impacts the autonomy of its users is a topic of increasing focus. However, much of the literature that explores these impacts fails to engage in depth with the philosophical literature on autonomy. This has resulted in a failure to consider the full range of impacts that social media might have on autonomy. A deeper consideration of these impacts is thus needed, given the importance of both autonomy as a moral concept and social (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Social Media, Trust, and the Epistemology of Prejudice.Karen Frost-Arnold - 2016 - Social Epistemology 30 (5-6):513-531.
    Ignorance of one’s privileges and prejudices is an epistemic problem. While the sources of ignorance of privilege and prejudice are increasingly understood, less clarity exists about how to remedy ignorance. In fact, the various causes of ignorance can seem so powerful, various, and mutually reinforcing that studying the epistemology of ignorance can inspire pessimism about combatting socially constructed ignorance. I argue that this pessimism is unwarranted. The testimony of members of oppressed groups can often help members of privileged groups overcome (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  8.  18
    Gratifications for Social Media Use in Entrepreneurship Courses: Learners’ Perspective.Yenchun Wu & Dafong Song - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    The purpose of this study is to understand the current state of learners' use of social media in entrepreneurship courses and explore uses and gratifications on social media in entrepreneurship courses from the learners' perspective. The respondents must have participated in government or private entrepreneurship courses and joined the online group of those courses. Respondents are not college students, but more entrepreneurs, and their multi-attribute makes the research results and explanatory more abundant. The methods used are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  9.  40
    Social Media for Socially Responsible Firms: Analysis of Fortune 500’s Twitter Profiles and Their CSR/CSIR Ratings.Kiljae Lee, Won-Yong Oh & Namhyeok Kim - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (4):791-806.
    The instrumental benefits of firm’s CSR activities are contingent upon the stakeholders’ awareness and favorable attribution. While social media creates an important momentum for firms to cultivate favorable awareness by establishing a powerful framework of stakeholder relationships, the opportunities are not distributed evenly for all firms. In this paper, we investigate the impact of CSR credentials on the effectiveness of social media as a stakeholder-relationship management platform. The analysis of Fortune 500 companies in the Twitter sphere (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  10.  4
    Social Media Marketing for Digital Photographers.Lawrence Chan - 2011 - Wiley.
    Teaching photographers how to use social media to grow their businesses With the rapid rise of both digital photography and social media, amateur photographers can now turn what was once a hobby into a thriving business. Social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Flickr offer loads of exciting marketing opportunities. This practical guide from a well-respected professional photographer shows you how to take advantage of social media to grow a profitable (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  26
    Social Media and Well-Being: Pitfalls, Progress, and Next Steps.Ethan Kross, Philippe Verduyn, Gal Sheppes, Cory K. Costello, John Jonides & Oscar Ybarra - 2021 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 25 (1):55-66.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12. Confucian Social Media: An Oxymoron?Pak-Hang Wong - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (3):283-296.
    International observers and critics often attack China's Internet policy on the basis of liberal values. If China's Internet is designed and built on Confucian values that are distinct from, and sometimes incompatible to, liberal values, then the liberalist critique ought to be reconsidered. In this respect, Mary Bockover's “Confucian Values and the Internet: A Potential Conflict” appears to be the most direct attempt to address this issue. Yet, in light of developments since its publication in 2003, it is time to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  13. Social Media Disinformation and the Security Threat to Democratic Legitimacy.Regina Rini - 2019 - NATO Association of Canada: Disinformation and Digital Democracies in the 21st Century:10-14.
    This short piece draws on political philosophy to show how social media interference operations can be used by hostile states to weaken the apparent legitimacy of democratic governments. Democratic societies are particularly vulnerable to this form of attack because democratic governments depend for their legitimacy on citizens' trust in one another. But when citizen see one another as complicit in the distribution of deceptive content, they lose confidence in the epistemic preconditions for democracy. The piece concludes with policy (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. Social Media, Love, and Sartre’s Look of the Other: Why Online Communication Is Not Fulfilling.Michael Lopato - 2016 - Philosophy and Technology 29 (3):195-210.
    We live in a world which is more connected than ever before. We can now send messages to a friend or colleague with a touch of a button, can learn about other’s interests before we even meet them, and now leave a digital trail behind us—whether we intend to or not. One question which, in proportion to its importance, has been asked quite infrequently since the dawn of the Internet era involves exactly how meaningful all of these connections are. To (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15.  39
    Social Media Policies: Implications for Contemporary Notions of Corporate Social Responsibility.Cynthia Stohl, Michael Etter, Scott Banghart & DaJung Woo - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (3):413-436.
    Three global developments situate the context of this investigation: the increasing use of social media by organizations and their employees, the burgeoning presence of social media policies, and the heightened focus on corporate social responsibility. In this study the intersection of these trends is examined through a content analysis of 112 publicly available social media policies from the largest corporations in the world. The extent to which social media policies facilitate and/or (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  16.  52
    Social Media in Disaster Risk Reduction and Crisis Management.David E. Alexander - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (3):717-733.
    This paper reviews the actual and potential use of social media in emergency, disaster and crisis situations. This is a field that has generated intense interest. It is characterised by a burgeoning but small and very recent literature. In the emergencies field, social media (blogs, messaging, sites such as Facebook, wikis and so on) are used in seven different ways: listening to public debate, monitoring situations, extending emergency response and management, crowd-sourcing and collaborative development, creating (...) cohesion, furthering causes (including charitable donation) and enhancing research. Appreciation of the positive side of social media is balanced by their potential for negative developments, such as disseminating rumours, undermining authority and promoting terrorist acts. This leads to an examination of the ethics of social media usage in crisis situations. Despite some clearly identifiable risks, for example regarding the violation of privacy, it appears that public consensus on ethics will tend to override unscrupulous attempts to subvert the media. Moreover, social media are a robust means of exposing corruption and malpractice. In synthesis, the widespread adoption and use of social media by members of the public throughout the world heralds a new age in which it is imperative that emergency managers adapt their working practices to the challenge and potential of this development. At the same time, they must heed the ethical warnings and ensure that social media are not abused or misused when crises and emergencies occur. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  17.  2
    Social Media as Inadvertent Educators.Alkis Kotsonis - 2022 - Journal of Moral Education 51 (2):155-168.
    ABSTRACT My aim in this paper is to examine the epistemic habits that agents develop through frequent social media usage. I point out that extensive social media usage is conducive to the development of closed-mindedness and unreflective thinking and accordingly argue that social media act as inadvertent educators of epistemic vices. I contend that understanding social media as generators of epistemic dispositions is of significant import to intellectual character education. It shows the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18.  47
    Social Media, E‐Health, and Medical Ethics.Mélanie Terrasse, Moti Gorin & Dominic Sisti - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (1):24-33.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  19.  12
    Social Media as Inadvertent Educators.Alkis Kotsonis - 2020 - Journal of Moral Education:1-14.
  20. What Social Media Facilitates, Social Media Should Regulate: Duties in the New Public Sphere.Leonie Smith - 2021 - The Political Quarterly 92 (2):1-8.
    This article offers a distinctive way of grounding the regulative duties held by social media companies (SMCs). One function of the democratic state is to provide what we term the right to democratic epistemic participation within the public sphere. But social media has transformed our public sphere, such that SMCs now facilitate citizens’ right to democratic epistemic participation and do so on a scale that was previously impossible. We argue that this role of SMCs in expanding (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  4
    Doing Social Media Analytics.Timothy Cribbin, Julie Barnett & Phillip Brooker - 2016 - Big Data and Society 3 (2).
    In the few years since the advent of ‘Big Data’ research, social media analytics has begun to accumulate studies drawing on social media as a resource and tool for research work. Yet, there has been relatively little attention paid to the development of methodologies for handling this kind of data. The few works that exist in this area often reflect upon the implications of ‘grand’ social science methodological concepts for new social media research. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  22.  25
    Mining Social Media Data: How Are Research Sponsors and Researchers Addressing the Ethical Challenges?Joanna Taylor & Claudia Pagliari - 2018 - Research Ethics 14 (2):1-39.
    Background:Data representing people’s behaviour, attitudes, feelings and relationships are increasingly being harvested from social media platforms and re-used for research purposes. This can be ethically problematic, even where such data exist in the public domain. We set out to explore how the academic community is addressing these challenges by analysing a national corpus of research ethics guidelines and published studies in one interdisciplinary research area.Methods:Ethics guidelines published by Research Councils UK, its seven-member councils and guidelines cited within these (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  23.  7
    Social Media as a Form of Virtual Whistleblowing: Empirical Evidence for Elements of the Diamond Model.Hengky Latan, Charbel Jose Chiappetta Jabbour & Ana Beatriz Lopes de Sousa Jabbour - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (3):529-548.
    This article originally advances the field of organizational whistleblowing by empirically investigating the suitability of the four elements of the fraud diamond as a means to understand the intention to disclose wrongdoing through virtual channels. This article also makes a contribution on the theme of whistleblowing as it relates to customers, an under-studied, however, relevant stakeholder in this field. The main findings of the article are as follows: the four elements of the fraud diamond as they relate to whistleblowing—a combination (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24.  10
    Problematic Social Media Usage and Anxiety Among University Students During the COVID-19 Pandemic: The Mediating Role of Psychological Capital and the Moderating Role of Academic Burnout.Yan Jiang - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The outbreak of COVID-19 has greatly affected university students’ studies and life. This study aimed to examine the possible mediating role of psychological capital and the moderating role of academic burnout in the relationship between problematic social media usage and anxiety among university students during COVID-19. A total of 3,123 undergraduates from universities in Shanghai participated in an online survey from March to April 2020. The results showed that problematic social media usage among university students predicted (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Role of Social Media Marketing Activities in China’s E-Commerce Industry: A Stimulus Organism Response Theory Context.Muhammad Sohaib, Asif Ali Safeer & Abdul Majeed - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Social media marketing has become one of the most significant growth paths for many businesses in today’s world. However, many companies are still unclear about using social media marketing to get their advantages, particularly in an e-commerce environment. In this background, this study is proposed to examine the effects of social media marketing activities on relationship quality, such as commitment, trust, and satisfaction in order to predict consumers’ online repurchase intentions in China’s e-commerce environment. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Policy Response, Social Media and Science Journalism for the Sustainability of the Public Health System Amid the COVID-19 Outbreak: The Vietnam Lessons.La Viet Phuong, Pham Thanh Hang, Manh-Toan Ho, Nguyen Minh Hoang, Nguyen Phuc Khanh Linh, Vuong Thu Trang, Nguyen To Hong Kong, Tran Trung, Khuc Van Quy, Ho Manh Tung & Quan-Hoang Vuong - 2020 - Sustainability 12:2931.
    Vietnam, with a geographical proximity and a high volume of trade with China, was the first country to record an outbreak of the new Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 or SARS-CoV-2. While the country was expected to have a high risk of transmission, as of April 4, 2020—in comparison to attempts to contain the disease around the world—responses from Vietnam are being seen as prompt and effective in protecting the interests of its citizens, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27.  60
    Artificial Intelligence, Social Media and Depression. A New Concept of Health-Related Digital Autonomy.Sebastian Laacke, Regina Mueller, Georg Schomerus & Sabine Salloch - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (7):4-20.
    The development of artificial intelligence in medicine raises fundamental ethical issues. As one example, AI systems in the field of mental health successfully detect signs of mental disorders...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  28.  48
    Tweetjacked: The Impact of Social Media on Corporate Greenwash.Thomas P. Lyon & A. Wren Montgomery - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (4):747-757.
    We theorize that social media will reduce the incidence of corporate greenwash. Drawing on the management literature on decoupling and the economic literature on information disclosure, we characterize specifically where this effect is likely to be most pronounced. We identify important differences between social media and traditional media, and present a theoretical framework for understanding greenwash in which corporate environmental communications may backfire if citizens and activists feel a company is engaging in excessive self-promotion. The (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  29. Digital Domination: Social Media and Contestatory Democracy.Ugur Aytac - 2022 - Political Studies.
    This paper argues that social media companies’ power to regulate communication in the public sphere illustrates a novel type of domination. The idea is that, since social media companies can partially dictate the terms of citizens’ political participation in the public sphere, they can arbitrarily interfere with the choices individuals make qua citizens. I contend that social media companies dominate citizens in two different ways. First, I focus on the cases in which social (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  35
    Social Media and Language Processing: How Facebook and Twitter Provide the Best Frequency Estimates for Studying Word Recognition.Herdağdelen Amaç & Marelli Marco - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (4):976-995.
    Corpus-based word frequencies are one of the most important predictors in language processing tasks. Frequencies based on conversational corpora are shown to better capture the variance in lexical decision tasks compared to traditional corpora. In this study, we show that frequencies computed from social media are currently the best frequency-based estimators of lexical decision reaction times. The results are robust and are still substantial when we control for corpus size.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  58
    Social Media and Living Well.Berrin A. Beasley & Mitchell R. Haney (eds.) - 2015 - Lexington Books.
    With each major technological shift, the question of well-being arises with new purpose. In this book, leading scholars in the philosophy and communication disciplines bring together their knowledge and expertise in an attempt to define what well-being means in this perpetually connected environment.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  25
    Social Media Use and Mental Health and Well-Being Among Adolescents – A Scoping Review.Viktor Schønning, Gunnhild Johnsen Hjetland, Leif Edvard Aarø & Jens Christoffer Skogen - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33.  5
    One Social Media Company to Rule Them All: Associations Between Use of Facebook-Owned Social Media Platforms, Sociodemographic Characteristics, and the Big Five Personality Traits.Davide Marengo, Cornelia Sindermann, Jon D. Elhai & Christian Montag - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  34.  18
    Empathy, Social Media, and Directed Altruistic Living Organ Donation.Greg Moorlock & Heather Draper - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (5):289-297.
    In this article we explore some of the ethical dimensions of using social media to increase the number of living kidney donors. Social media provides a platform for changing non-identifiable ‘statistical victims’ into ‘real people’ with whom we can identify and feel empathy: the so-called ‘identifiable victim effect’, which prompts charitable action. We examine three approaches to promoting kidney donation using social media which could take advantages of the identifiable victim effect: institutionally organized campaigns (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  2
    The built environment in Social Media: towards a Biosemiotic Approach.Federico Bellentani & Daria Arkhipova - forthcoming - Biosemiotics:1-21.
    The paper presents a biosemiotic approach to the study of the built environment, its representations and practices in social media. First, it outlines the main developments that make semiotics hold a significant position in the study of urban space and the built environment. It then goes on to overcome the limitations of the binary opposition paradigm: in particular, nature/culture is reconsidered as a category in which the two terms are in a relation of mutual participation rather than being (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Team Social Media Usage and Team Creativity: The Role of Team Knowledge Sharing and Team-Member Exchange.Hui Wang, Yuting Xiao, Xinwen Su & Xiangqing Li - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Given that work teams have been widely used in a variety of organizations to complete critical tasks and that the use of social media in work teams has been growing, investigating whether and how team social media usage affects team creativity is imperative. However, little research has empirically explored how TSMU affects team creativity. This study divides TSMU into two categories, namely, work-related TSMU and relationship-related TSMU. Basing on communication visibility theory and social exchange theory, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  47
    Social Media, Interpersonal Relations and the Objective Attitude.Michael-John Turp - 2020 - Ethics and Information Technology 22 (3):269-279.
    How do social media affect interpersonal relationships? Adopting a Strawsonian framework, I argue that social media make us more likely to adopt the objective attitude towards persons. Technologically mediated communication tends to inhibit interpersonal emotions and other reactive attitudes. This is due to a relative lack of the social cues that typically enable us to read minds and react to them. Adopting the objective attitude can be harmful for two reasons. First, it tends to undermine (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Social Media for a Philosopher.Markku Roinila - 2011 - New Apps Blog.
    In this brief review I discuss various social media used by philosophers, such as Academia.edu, PhilPapers, blogs and email-lists. Strenghts and weaknesses of different medias are evaluated.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  13
    Social Media, Financial Algorithms and the Hack Crash.Tero Karppi & Kate Crawford - 2016 - Theory, Culture and Society 33 (1):73-92.
    ‘@AP: Breaking: Two Explosions in the White House and Barack Obama is injured’. So read a tweet sent from a hacked Associated Press Twitter account @AP, which affected financial markets, wiping out $136.5 billion of the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index’s value. While the speed of the Associated Press hack crash event and the proprietary nature of the algorithms involved make it difficult to make causal claims about the relationship between social media and trading algorithms, we argue that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  40. Social Media and Self-Control: The Vices and Virtues of Attention.Juan Pablo Bermúdez - 2017 - In C. G. Prado (ed.), Social Media and Your Brain: Web-Based Communication Is Changing How We Think and Express Ourselves. Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger. pp. 57-74.
    Self-control, the capacity to resist temptations and pursue longer-term goals over immediate gratifications, is crucial in determining the overall shape of our lives, and thereby in our ability to shape our identities. As it turns out, this capacity is intimately linked with our ability to control the direction of our attention. This raises the worry that perhaps social media are making us more easily distracted people, and therefore less able to exercise self-control. Is this so? And is it (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  4
    Social Media for Knowledge Acquisition and Dissemination: The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Collaborative Learning Driven Social Media Adoption.Muhammad Naeem Khan, Muhammad Azeem Ashraf, Donald Seinen, Kashif Ullah Khan & Rizwan Ahmed Laar - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    During the COVID-19 outbreak, educational institutions were closed, and students worldwide were confined to their homes. In an educational environment, students depend on collaborative learning to improve their learning performance. This study aimed to increase the understanding of social media adoption among students during the COVID-19 pandemic for the purpose of CL. Social media provides a learning platform that enables students to easily communicate with their peers and subject specialists, and is conducive to students' CL. This (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  46
    Diy Citizenship: Critical Making and Social Media.Matt Ratto & Megan Boler (eds.) - 2014 - MIT Press.
    Today, DIY -- do-it-yourself -- describes more than self-taught carpentry. Social media enables DIY citizens to organize and protest in new ways and to repurpose corporate content in order to offer political counternarratives. This book examines the usefulness and limits of DIY citizenship, exploring the diverse forms of political participation and "critical making" that have emerged in recent years. The authors and artists in this collection describe DIY citizens whose activities range from activist fan blogging and video production (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  43.  2
    Social Media Use in Academia.Shivinder Nijjer & Sahil Raj - 2020 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 18 (2):255-280.
    Purpose The high rate of internet penetration has led to the proliferation of social media use, even at the workplace, including academia. This research attempts to develop a topology and thereby determine the dominant use motive for faculty’s use of SM. Design/methodology/approach In this two-part study, a two-stage research design has been adopted for topology development based on the application of Uses and Gratifications Theory. In the second part, the Technology Acceptance Model is applied to discern the dominant (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  3
    Social Media and the Value of Truth.Berrin Beasley & Mitchell R. Haney - 2012 - Lexington Books.
    This volume will be of special interest to anyone concerned with modern applied ethical issues, particularly those in the areas of philosophy, communication, media studies, and journalism. This volume brings together leading experts in journalism, communication studies, and philosophy to discuss the value of truth in an age of social media.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45.  76
    Social Media and the Production of Knowledge: A Return to Little Science?Leah A. Lievrouw - 2010 - Social Epistemology 24 (3):219-237.
    In the classic study Little science, big science (New York: Columbia University Press, 1963), Derek Price traces the historical shift from what he calls little science?exemplified by early?modern ?invisible colleges? of scientific amateurs and enthusiasts engaged in small?scale, informal interactions and personal correspondence?to 20th?century big science, dominated by professional scientists and wealthy institutions, where scientific information (primarily in print form and its analogues) was mass?produced, marketed and circulated on a global scale. This article considers whether the growing use of more (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  46.  30
    Developing Social Media Literacy: How Children Learn to Interpret Risky Opportunities on Social Network Sites.Sonia Livingstone - 2014 - Communications 39 (3):283-303.
    The widespread use of social network sites by children has significantly reconfigured how they communicate, with whom and with what consequences. This article analyzes cross-national interviews and focus groups to explore the risky opportunities children experience online. It introduces the notion of social media literacy and examines how children learn to interpret and engage with the technological and textual affordances and social dimensions of SNSs in determining what is risky and why. Informed by media literacy (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47.  13
    Social Media and Communication Ethic in Islamic Perspective.Lisnawati Desi Erawati - 2019 - Epistemé: Jurnal Pengembangan Ilmu Keislaman 14 (1):27-46.
    Social media is very useful for establishing warm communication between family, friends, and various society. For those, needed to keep a good communication relationship. This paper examines how communication ethics on social mediafor married couples to prevent family disharmony. Uses literature studies, this paper analyzes primary sources, namely positive law, interpretation, hadith, and references related to social media. Then it is also added with secondary data from magazines, newspapers, documentation from the local religious court. The (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  6
    Social Media and Microtargeting: Political Data Processing and the Consequences for Germany.Orestis Papakyriakopoulos, Simon Hegelich, Morteza Shahrezaye & Juan Carlos Medina Serrano - 2018 - Big Data and Society 5 (2).
    Amongst other methods, political campaigns employ microtargeting, a specific technique used to address the individual voter. In the US, microtargeting relies on a broad set of collected data about the individual. However, due to the unavailability of comparable data in Germany, the practice of microtargeting is far more challenging. Citizens in Germany widely treat social media platforms as a means for political debate. The digital traces they leave through their interactions provide a rich information pool, which can create (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  30
    Using Social Media in Research: New Ethics for a New Meme?Eric S. Swirsky, Jinger G. Hoop & Susan Labott - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (10):60-61.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  50.  82
    The Ethics of Quitting Social Media.Robert Mark Simpson - 2021 - In Carissa Véliz (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Digital Ethics. Oxford, UK:
    There are prima facie ethical reasons and prudential reasons for people to avoid or withdraw from social media platforms. But in response to pushes for people to quit social media, a number of authors have argued that there is something ethically questionable about quitting social media: that it involves — typically, if not necessarily — an objectionable expression of privilege on the part of the quitter. In this paper I contextualise privilege-based objections to quitting (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000