Results for 'Social responsibility'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  18
    Voluntary codes of conduct for multinational corporations: Promises and challenges.Socially Responsible Investing & Barbara Krumsiek - 2004 - Business and Society Review 109 (4):583-593.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  30
    Corporate Social Responsibility as a Strategic Shield Against Costs of Earnings Management Practices.Jennifer Martínez-Ferrero, Shantanu Banerjee & Isabel María García-Sánchez - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (2):305-324.
    We highlight how Corporate Social Responsibility can be strategically used against the negative perception from earnings management. Using international data, we analyse the effect of CSR and EM on the cost of capital and corporate reputation. Results confirm that CSR strategy is positively valued by investors and other stakeholders. Contrary to EM, CSR has a positive effect on corporate reputation and lowers the cost of capital. In addition, we also find that the favourable effect of CSR on cost (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  3.  68
    Corporate social responsibility perception in business students as future managers: a multifactorial analysis.María del Mar Alonso-Almeida, Fernando Casani Fernández de Navarrete & Jesus Rodriguez-Pomeda - 2014 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (1):1-17.
    This paper examines undergraduate business students' perception of corporate social responsibility in cases in which they have not attended any specific course either dealing with CSR or providing training in ethics. A survey was conducted of 535 Spanish business students as future managers. The results show that the stakeholders' perspective deserves a huge attention for those students considering what the keys of business success are. Significant differences in perception were nevertheless identified when a multifactorial analysis was undertaken. Female (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  4. Personal and Social Responsibility for Health.Daniel Wikler - 2002 - Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):47-55.
    Everyone wants to be healthy, but many of us decline to act in healthy ways. Should these choices have any bearing on the ethics of clinical practice and health policy? How may personal responsibility for health be manipulated in health policy debates.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   62 citations  
  5. The Nature and Management of Ethical Corporate Identity: A Commentary on Corporate Identity, Corporate Social Responsibility and Ethics.John M. T. Balmer, Kyoko Fukukawa & Edmund R. Gray - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (1):7-15.
    In this paper we open up the topic of ethical corporate identity: what we believe to be a new, as well as highly salient, field of inquiry for scholarship in ethics and corporate social responsibility. Taking as our starting point Balmer’s (in Balmer and Greyser, 2002) AC2ID test model of corporate identity – a pragmatic tool of identity management – we explore the specificities of an ethical form of corporate identity. We draw key insights from conceptualizations of corporate (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  6. Investigating the Impact of Firm Size on Small Business Social Responsibility: A Critical Review.Jan Lepoutre & Aimé Heene - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 67 (3):257-273.
    The impact of smaller firm size on corporate social responsibility (CSR) is ambiguous. Some contend that small businesses are socially responsible by nature, while others argue that a smaller firm size imposes barriers on small firms that constrain their ability to take responsible action. This paper critically analyses recent theoretical and empirical contributions on the size–social responsibility relationship among small businesses. More specifically, it reviews the impact of firm size on four antecedents of business behaviour: issue (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   85 citations  
  7. Small Business Champions for Corporate Social Responsibility.Heledd Jenkins - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 67 (3):241-256.
    While Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has traditionally been the domain of the corporate sector, recognition of the growing significance of the Small and Medium Sized Enterprise (SME) sector has led to an emphasis on their social and environmental impact, illustrated by an increasing number of initiatives aimed at engaging SMEs in the CSR agenda. CSR has been well researched in large companies, but SMEs have received less attention in this area. This paper presents the findings from a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   95 citations  
  8. Stakeholder Influence Capacity and the Variability of Financial Returns to Corporate Social Responsibility.Michael L. Barnett - 2005 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:287-292.
    This paper argues that research on the business case for corporate social responsibility (CSR) must account for the path dependent nature of firm-stakeholderrelations, and develops the construct of stakeholder influence capacity (SIC) to fill this void. SIC helps to explain why the effects of CSR on corporate financial performance (CFP) vary across firms and across time, therein providing a missing link in the study of the business case. This paper distinguishes CSR from related and confounded corporate resource allocations (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   136 citations  
  9. The Impact of Board Diversity and Gender Composition on Corporate Social Responsibility and Firm Reputation.Stephen Bear, Noushi Rahman & Corinne Post - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):207 - 221.
    This article explores how the diversity of board resources and the number of women on boards affect firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR) ratings, and how, in turn, CSR influences corporate reputation. In addition, this article examines whether CSR ratings mediate the relationships among board resource diversity, gender composition, and corporate reputation. The OLS regression results using lagged data for independent and control variables were statistically significant for the gender composition hypotheses, but not for the resource diversitybased hypotheses. CSR (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   91 citations  
  10. Vice or Virtue? The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on Executive Compensation.Ye Cai, Hoje Jo & Carrie Pan - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):159-173.
    We empirically examine the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on CEO compensation using a large sample of the US firms from 1996 to 2010. We develop and test two hypotheses, the overinvestment hypothesis based on agency theory and the conflict–resolution hypothesis based on stakeholder theory. We find that the lag of CSR adversely affects both total compensation and cash compensation, after controlling for various firm and board characteristics. Our estimates show that an interquartile increase in CSR is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  11.  64
    The Roles of Leadership Styles in Corporate Social Responsibility.Shuili Du, Valérie Swaen, Adam Lindgreen & Sankar Sen - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (1):155-169.
    This research investigates the interplay between leadership styles and institutional corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices. A large-scale field survey of managers reveals that firms with greater transformational leadership are more likely to engage in institutional CSR practices, whereas transactional leadership is not associated with such practices. Furthermore, stakeholder-oriented marketing reinforces the positive link between transformational leadership and institutional CSR practices. Finally, transactional leadership enhances, whereas transformational leadership diminishes, the positive relationship between institutional CSR practices and organizational outcomes. This (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  12.  74
    The Financial Performance of a Socially Responsible Investment Over Time and a Possible Link with Corporate Social Responsibility.Greig A. Mill - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (2):131-148.
    This paper empirically examines the financial performance of a UK unit trust that was initially “conventional” and later adopted socially responsible investment (SRI) principles (ethical investment principles). Comparison is made with three similar conventional funds whose investment objectives remained unchanged. Analysis techniques employed in previous studies find similar results: mean risk-adjusted performance is unchanged by the switch to SRI, with no evidence of over-or under-performance relative to the benchmark market index by any of the four funds. More interestingly, changes in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  13.  20
    The Relationship Between Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee-Related Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis.Agnieszka Paruzel, Hannah J. P. Klug & Günter W. Maier - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Although there is much research on the relationships of corporate social responsibility and employee-related outcomes, a systematic and quantitative integration of research findings is needed to substantiate and broaden our knowledge. A meta-analysis allows the comparison of the relations of different types of CSR on several different outcomes, for example to learn what type of CSR is most important to employees. From a theoretical perspective, social identity theory is the most prominent theoretical approach in CSR research, so (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  14.  87
    On the Determinants of Corporate Social Responsibility: International Evidence on the Financial Industry.Hsiang-Lin Chih, Hsiang-Hsuan Chih & Tzu-Yin Chen - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1):115-135.
    This article sets out to undertake a thorough, point-by-point examination of the theory postulated by Campbell (2007), in which an attempt is made to specify the conditions under which corporations may or may not act in socially responsible ways. In order to ensure the overall reliability of our study, and to attempt to provide a new understanding of, and greater insights into, whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) is affected by financial and institutional variables, we empirically investigate a total (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  15.  28
    “It’s Like Hating Puppies!” Employee Disengagement and Corporate Social Responsibility.Kelsy Hejjas, Graham Miller & Caroline Scarles - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (2):319-337.
    Corporate social responsibility has been linked with numerous organizational advantages, including recruitment, retention, productivity, and morale, which relate specifically to employees. However, despite specific benefits of CSR relating to employees and their importance as a stakeholder group, it is noteworthy that a lack of attention has been paid to the individual level of analysis with CSR primarily being studied at the organizational level. Both research and practice of CSR have largely treated the individual organization as a “black box,” (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  16.  79
    Finance as a Driver of Corporate Social Responsibility.Bert Scholtens - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (1):19-33.
    Finance is grease to the economy. Therefore, we assume that it may affect corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the sustainability of economic development too. This paper discusses the transmission mechanisms between finance and sustainability. We find that there is no simple one-to-one relationship between financial development and sustainable development but there are various – often indirect – linkages. It appears that most of the literature concentrates on the role of public shareholders when it comes to changing corporate policy (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  17. Whistleblowing and organizational social responsibility: a global assessment.Wim Vandekerckhove - 2006 - Burlington, VT: Ashgate.
    Developing research questions -- Developing the framework for an ethical assessment -- Possible legitimation of whistleblowing policies -- Screening whistleblowing policies -- Towards what legitimation of whistleblowing?
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  18.  44
    The Effects of Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility on Employee Attitudes.Ante Glavas & Ken Kelley - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (2):165-202.
    ABSTRACT:We explore the impact on employee attitudes of their perceptions of how others outside the organization are treated above and beyond the impact of how employees are directly treated by the organization. Results of a study of 827 employees in eighteen organizations show that employee perceptions of corporate social responsibility are positively related to organizational commitment with the relationship being partially mediated by work meaningfulness and perceived organizational support and job satisfaction with work meaningfulness partially mediating the relationship (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  19.  48
    Effects of corporate social responsibility on customer satisfaction and organizational attractiveness: A signaling perspective.Qingyu Zhang, Mei Cao, Fangfang Zhang, Jing Liu & Xin Li - 2019 - Business Ethics: A European Review 29 (1):20-34.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  20.  38
    Being Responsible: How Managers Aim to Implement Corporate Social Responsibility.Anne Galander, Simon Oertel & Michael Hunoldt - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (7):1441-1482.
    Focusing on the corporate social responsibility (CSR) implementation process, we analyze how institutional complexity that arises from tensions between social and environmental elements and economic and technical concerns is managed by CSR managers. We further question how these micro-level processes interact with organizational-level processes over time. Our research is a 24-month qualitative process study in which we followed CSR managers. The study’s results allow us to distinguish between four strategies that CSR managers use to promote CSR implementation (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  21.  33
    Enhancing the Role and Effectiveness of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Reports: The Missing Element of Content Verification and Integrity Assurance.S. Prakash Sethi, Terrence F. Martell & Mert Demir - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (1):59-82.
    Corporate Social Responsibility reporting by large corporations has witnessed phenomenal growth over the last two decades. The voluntary nature of these disclosures, however, has led to inconsistencies in reporting formats, treatment, and inclusion of various contextual elements, and a lack of robust measures pertaining to the quality and accuracy of the reports’ content. Efforts to address these drawbacks such as Global Reporting Initiative and ISO 26000 have proven unsatisfactory due to their primary emphasis on process for creating CSR (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  22.  20
    Gender equity and corporate social responsibility in a post-feminist era.Lindsay J. Thompson - 2007 - Business Ethics: A European Review 17 (1):87-106.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  23.  46
    The ethics of corporate social responsibility and philanthropic venturesl.Myrna Wulfson - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 29 (1-2):135 - 145.
    Andrew Carnegie popularized the principles of charity and stewardship in 1899 when he published The Gospel of Wealth. At the time, Carnegie''s ideas were the exception rather than the rule. He believed that businesses and wealthy individuals were the caretakers or stewards of their property holding it in trust for the benefit of society as a whole.One of the most visible ways a business can help a community is through corporate philanthropy. While the courts have ruled that charitable contributions fall (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  24. From Participation to Interruption : Toward an ethics of stakeholder engagement, participation and partnership in corporate social responsibility and responsible innovation.V. Blok - 2019 - In René von Schomberg & Jonathan Hankins (eds.), International Handbook on Responsible Innovation. A global resource. Cheltenham, Royaume-Uni: Edward Elgar Publishing.
    Contrary to the tendency to harmony, consensus and alignment among stakeholders in most of the literature on participation and partnership in corporate social responsibility and responsible innovation practices, in this chapter we ask which concept of participation and partnership is able to account for stakeholder engagement while acknowledging and appreciating their fundamentally different judgements, value frames and viewpoints. To this end, we reflect on a non-reductive and ethical approach to stakeholder engagement, collaboration and partnership, inspired by the philosophy (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  25.  63
    Who Needs CSR? The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on National Competitiveness.Ioanna Boulouta & Christos N. Pitelis - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (3):349-364.
    The link between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and competitiveness has been examined mainly at the business level. The purpose of this paper is to improve conceptual understanding and provide empirical evidence on the link between CSR and competitiveness at the national level. We draw on an eclectic-synthetic framework of international economics, strategic management and CSR literatures to explore conceptually whether and how CSR can impact on the competitiveness of nations, and test our hypotheses empirically with a sample of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  26.  27
    Will Women Lead the Way? Differences in Demand for Corporate Social Responsibility Information for Investment Decisions.Leda Nath, Lori Holder-Webb & Jeffrey Cohen - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (1):85-102.
    Recent years have featured a leap in academic and public interest in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities and related corporate reporting. Two main themes in this literature are the exploration of management incentives to engage in and disclose this information, and of the use and value of this information to market participants. We extend the second theme by examining the interest that specific investor classes have in the use of CSR information. We rely on feminist intersectionality, which suggests (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  27.  40
    The Role of CEO’s Personal Incentives in Driving Corporate Social Responsibility.Michele Fabrizi, Christine Mallin & Giovanna Michelon - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (2):311-326.
    In this study, we explore the role of Chief Executive Officers’ incentives, split between monetary and non-monetary, in relation to corporate social responsibility. We base our analysis on a sample of 597 US firms over the period 2005–2009. We find that both monetary and non-monetary incentives have an effect on CSR decisions. Specifically, monetary incentives designed to align the CEO’s and shareholders’ interests have a negative effect on CSR and non-monetary incentives have a positive effect on CSR. The (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  28.  94
    Values and the Perceived Importance of Ethics and Social Responsibility: The U.S. versus China.William E. Shafer, Kyoko Fukukawa & Grace Meina Lee - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):265-284.
    This study examines the effects of nationality (U.S. vs. China) and personal values on managers’ responses to the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility (PRESOR) scale. Evidence that China’s transition to a socialist market economy has led to widespread business corruption, led us to hypothesize that People’s Republic of China (PRC) managers would believe less strongly in the importance of ethical and socially responsible business conduct. We also hypothesized that after controlling for national differences, managers’ personal values (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  29.  87
    An Examination of the Structure of Executive Compensation and Corporate Social Responsibility: A Canadian Investigation.Lois Schafer Mahoney & Linda Thorn - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 69 (2):149-162.
    We explore the extent to which Boards use executive compensation to incite firms to act in accordance with social and environmental objectives (e.g., Johnson, R. and D. Greening: 1999, Academy of Management Journal 42(5), 564-578; Kane, E. J.: 2002, Journal of Banking and Finance 26, 1919-1933.). We examine the association between executive compensation and corporate social responsibility (CSR) for 77 Canadian firms using three key components of executives' compensation structure: salary, bonus, and stock options. Similar to prior (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  30.  32
    The changing role of governments in corporate social responsibility: drivers and responses.Laura Albareda, Josep M. Lozano, Antonio Tencati, Atle Midttun & Francesco Perrini - 2008 - Business Ethics: A European Review 17 (4):347-363.
    The aim of this article is to contribute to understanding the changing role of government in promoting corporate social responsibility (CSR). Over the last decade, governments have joined other stakeholders in assuming a relevant role as drivers of CSR, working together with intergovernmental organizations and recognizing that public policies are key in encouraging a greater sense of CSR. This paper focuses on the analysis of the new strategies adopted by governments in order to promote, and encourage businesses to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  31.  77
    Stakeholders' perceptions and future scenarios to improve corporate social responsibility in Hong Kong and mainland china.Joyce Tsoi - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (3):391 - 404.
    Globalisation has accelerated economic development in emerging economies through the outsourcing of their supply chains and at the same time has accelerated the degradation of environmental and social conditions. Society expects corporations to play an essential role in creating economic, environmental and social prosperity beyond their country of origin. In order to regulate outsourcing activities in the supply chain, many multinationals are constantly searching for ways to manage their indirect environmental and social impacts accordingly, as well as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  32.  65
    An Ethical Framework for the Marketing of Corporate Social Responsibility.Bert van De Ven - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):339-352.
    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop an ethical framework for the marketing of corporate social responsibility. Methods The approach is a conceptual one based on virtue ethics and on the corporate identity literature. Furthermore, empirical research results are used to describe the opportunities and pitfalls of using marketing communication tools in the strategy of building a virtuous corporate brand. Results/conclusions An ethical framework that addresses the paradoxical relation between the consequentialist perspective many proponents of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  33. Individual and social responsibility for health.Norman Daniels - 2011 - In Carl Knight & Zofia Stemplowska (eds.), Responsibility and distributive justice. Oxford University Press UK. pp. 266--286.
  34.  29
    Value-Enhancing Social Responsibility: Market Reaction to Donations by Family vs. Non-family Firms with Religious CEOs.Min Maung, Danny Miller, Zhenyang Tang & Xiaowei Xu - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):745-758.
    Using a signaling framework, we argue that ethical behavior as evidenced by charitable donations is viewed more positively by investors when seen not to be based on self-serving motives but rather on authentic generosity that builds moral capital. The affirmed religiosity of CEOs may make their ethical position more credible, while their embeddedness within a family business suggests that CEOs are backed by powerful owners with long-time horizons and a desire to build moral capital with stakeholders. We find in a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  35.  21
    The effect of culture on consumers' willingness to punish irresponsible corporate behaviour: applying Hofstede's typology to the punishment aspect of corporate social responsibility.Geoffrey Williams & John Zinkin - 2008 - Business Ethics 17 (2):210-226.
    This paper explores the relationship between attitudes to corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the cultural dimensions of business activity identified by Hofstede & Hofstede using a sample of nearly 90,000 stakeholders drawn from 28 countries. We develop five general propositions relating attitudes to CSR to aspects of culture. We show that the propensity of consumers to punish firms for bad behaviour varies in ways that appear to relate closely to the cultural characteristics identified by Hofstede. Furthermore, this variation (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  36.  18
    Realism or idealism? Corporate social responsibility and the employee stakeholder in the global fast-food industry.Tony Royle - 2005 - Business Ethics: A European Review 14 (1):42-55.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  37.  13
    Influence of corporate social responsibility on loyalty and valuation of services.Angel Herrero Crespo & Ignacio Rodríguez del Bosque - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (4):369-385.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  38.  30
    Communicative Dynamics and the Polyphony of Corporate Social Responsibility in the Network Society.Itziar Castelló, Mette Morsing & Friederike Schultz - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (4):683-694.
    This paper develops a media theoretical extension of the communicative view on corporate social responsibility by elaborating on the characteristics of network societies, arguing that new media increase the speed and connectivity, and lead to higher plurality and the potential polarization of reality constructions. We discuss the implications for corporate social responsibility of becoming more polyphonic and sketch the contours of “communicative legitimacy.” Finally, we present this special issue and develop some questions for future research.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  39. From Management Systems to Corporate Social Responsibility.Gerard I. J. M. Zwetsloot - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 44 (2-3):201-208.
    At the start of the 21st century, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) seems to have great potential for innovating business practices with a positive impact on People, Planet and Profit. In this article the differences between the management systems approach of the nineties, and Corporate Social Responsibility are analysed.An analysis is structured around three business principles that are relevant for CSR and management systems: (1) doing things right the first time, (2) doing the right things, and (3) (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  40.  8
    A Communicative Constitutive Perspective on Corporate Social Responsibility: Ventriloquism, Undecidability, and Surprisability.François Cooren - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (1):175-197.
    Adopting a communication as constitutive of organization (CCO) perspective on ethics and corporate social responsibility (CSR) invites us to create the conditions of a dialogue, discussion, or debate between various stakeholders, who can then try to confront their respective positions on a given issue, and possibly come to a decision regarding how a situation should be evaluated and/or responded to. As shown in this article, getting human stakeholders to voice their concerns about a specific situation is a way (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  41.  26
    Presidential Address: Bioethics and Social Responsibility.Daniel Wikler - 1997 - Bioethics 11 (3-4):185-192.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  42.  76
    The moderating effect of environmental munificence and dynamism on the relationship between discretionary social responsibility and firm performance.Irene Goll & Abdul A. Rasheed - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 49 (1):41-54.
    This study examines the relationships between a company''s emphasis on discretionary social responsibility, environment, and firm performance. It tests the proposition that environmental munificence and dynamism moderate the relationship between discretionary social responsibility and financial performance. Social responsibility was measured with a three-item scale in a sample of 62 firms using a questionnaire. Environmental munificence and dynamism were measured using archival sources as was financial performance (return on assets and return on sales). The results (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  43.  14
    The Moral Complexity of Agriculture: A Challenge for Corporate Social Responsibility.Evelien M. de Olde & Vladislav Valentinov - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (3):413-430.
    Over the past decades, the modernization of agriculture in the Western world has contributed not only to a rapid increase in food production but also to environmental and societal concerns over issues such as greenhouse gas emissions, soil quality and biodiversity loss. Many of these concerns, for example those related to animal welfare or labor conditions, are stuck in controversies and apparently deadlocked debates. As a result we observe a paradox in which a wide range of corporate social (...) initiatives, originally seeking to reconnect agriculture and society, frequently provoke debate, conflict, and protests. In order to make sense of this pattern, the present paper contends that Western agriculture is marked by moral complexity, i.e., the tendency of multiple legitimate moral standpoints to proliferate without the realistic prospect of a consensus. This contention is buttressed by a conceptual framework that draws inspiration the contemporary business ethics and systems-theoretic scholarship. From the systems-theoretic point of view, the evolution of moral complexity is traced back to the processes of agricultural modernization, specialization, and differentiation, each of which suppresses the responsiveness of the economic and legal institutions to the full range of societal and environmental concerns about agriculture. From the business ethics point of view, moral complexity is shown to prevent the transformation of the ethical responsibilities into the legal and economic responsibilities despite the ongoing institutionalization of CSR. Navigating moral complexity is shown to require moral judgments which are necessarily personal and contestable. These judgments are implicated in those CSR initiatives that require dealing with trade-offs among the different sustainability issues. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  44. Marxism, Business Ethics, and Corporate Social Responsibility.William H. Shaw - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):565-576.
    Originally delivered at a conference of Marxist philosophers in China, this article examines some links, and some tensions, between business ethics and the traditional concerns of Marxism. After discussing the emergence of business ethics as an academic discipline, it explores and attempts to answer two Marxist objections that might be brought against the enterprise of business ethics. The first is that business ethics is impossible because capitalism itself tends to produce greedy, overreaching, and unethical business behavior. The second is that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  45.  65
    Realism or idealism? Corporate social responsibility and the employee stakeholder in the global fast‐food industry.Tony Royle - 2005 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 14 (1):42-55.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  46.  72
    Why Corporations Should Not Abandon Social Responsibility.Moses L. Pava - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):805-812.
    Former U.S. Secretary of Labor Robert Reich, in his recent book Supercapitalism: The Transformation of Business, Democracy, and Everyday Life (2007), rejects outright the call for increased corporate social responsibility. He believes that social responsibility advocates are wasting resources and efforts on a doomed project. This article suggests that while Reich raises several interesting concerns in his counter-intuitive book, especially about the rise in corporate political power, ultimately his argument is unconvincing. Worse yet, a careful reading (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  47.  28
    Does Equity Ownership Matter for Corporate Social Responsibility? A Literature Review of Theories and Recent Empirical Findings.Christian M. Faller & Dodo zu Knyphausen-Aufseß - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (1):15-40.
    Based on the concept of shareholder primacy, many scholars have argued that it is more important for businesses to earn profits for their shareholders than to provide benefits to society at large. Corporate social responsibility is often regarded as an investment that comes at the expense of shareholders. In contrast, research analyzing the connections between the equity ownership structure of a company and its level of CSR engagement suggests that CSR offers benefits to shareholders that go beyond direct (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  48.  61
    Three Models of Corporate Social Responsibility: Interrelationships between Theory, Research, and Practice.Aviva Geva - 2008 - Business and Society Review 113 (1):1-41.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  49.  44
    Cross-sector Alliances for Corporate Social Responsibility Partner Heterogeneity Moderates Environmental Strategy Outcomes.Haiying Lin - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (2):219-229.
    This article provides a new mechanism in understanding how partner heterogeneity moderates an alliance's ability to advance corporate social responsibility goals. I identified the antecedents for firms to select a more diverse set of partners and explored whether more diverse alliances (especially cross-sector alliances) may facilitate partners to achieve more proactive environmental outcomes. I employ 146 environmental alliances formed in the U.S. between 1990 and 2009 to test the assertions. Results suggest that firms with innovative orientation and alliance (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  50.  21
    Non Sibi, Sed Omnibus: Influence of Supplier Collective Behaviour on Corporate Social Responsibility in the Bangladeshi Apparel Supply Chain.Enrico Fontana & Niklas Egels-Zandén - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (4):1047-1064.
    Local supplier corporate social responsibility in developing countries represents a powerful tool to improve labour conditions. This paper pursues an inter-organizational network approach to the global value chain literature to understand the influence of suppliers’ collective behaviour on their CSR engagement. This exploratory study of 30 export-oriented and first-tier apparel suppliers in Bangladesh, a developing country, makes three relevant contributions to GVC scholarship. First, we show that suppliers are interlinked in a horizontal network that restricts unilateral CSR engagement. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000