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  1.  40
    Listening: An exploration of philosophical traditions.Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon & Megan J. Laverty - 2011 - Educational Theory 61 (2):117-124.
  2.  9
    In Dialogue: Response to Frede V. Nielsen's?Didactology as a Field of Theory and Research in Music Education?Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon - 2005 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (1):95-98.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Philosophy of Music Education Review 13.1 (2005) 95-98 [Access article in PDF] Response to Frede V. Nielsen's "Didactology as a Field of Theory and Research in Music Education" Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon Northwestern University Let me begin by acknowledging what is about to become obvious: I am not a musicologist, music educator, or a philosopher of music education. I am, however, a philosopher of education and a devoted student of music, (...)
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  3.  2
    Listening — in a Democratic Society1.Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon - 2003 - Philosophy of Education 59:1-18.
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  4. Plato's philosophy of listening.Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon - 2011 - Educational Theory 61 (2):125-139.
    In the article, Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon asks, Did Plato have a philosophy of listening, and if so, what was it? Listening is the counterpart of speaking in a dialogue, and it is no less important. Indeed, learning from the dialogue is less likely to occur as people participate unless listening as well as speaking takes place. Haroutunian-Gordon defines a philosophy of listening as a set of beliefs that fall into four categories: (1) the aim of listening; (2) the nature of listening; (...)
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  5.  28
    Response to Wilna Meijer.Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon - 1994 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 13 (1):85-87.
  6.  42
    Statements of Method and Teaching: The Case of Socrates.Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon - 1990 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 10 (2):139-156.
    In this paper, I ponder the question of whether Socrates follows a method of investigation — the method of hypothesis — which he advocates in Plato's Phaedo. The evidence in the dialogue suggests that he does not follow the method, which raises additional questions: If he fails to do so, why does he articulate the method? Does his statement of method affect his actions or is it mainly forgotten? Although Socrates is a fictional character, his actions in the Phaedo suggests (...)
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  7.  34
    The selection of texts: Response to professor Alan Gewirth.Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon - 1994 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 13 (2):125-129.
  8.  12
    Response to Frede V. Nielsen's "Didactology as a Field of Theory and Research in Music Education".Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon - 2005 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (1):95-98.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Philosophy of Music Education Review 13.1 (2005) 95-98 [Access article in PDF] Response to Frede V. Nielsen's "Didactology as a Field of Theory and Research in Music Education" Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon Northwestern University Let me begin by acknowledging what is about to become obvious: I am not a musicologist, music educator, or a philosopher of music education. I am, however, a philosopher of education and a devoted student of music, (...)
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  9. The editor wishes to thank the following persons for their willingness to serve as manuscript reviewer for the journal between July 2003 and June 2004. [REVIEW]Bernadette Baker, Eric Bredo, Randal Curren, Paul Farber, Lynn Fendler, James Garrison, Jim Giarelli, David Granger, David Hansen & Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon - 2004 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 3 (489).
     
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  10.  25
    Explaining change in psychology: The road not taken. [REVIEW]Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon - 1988 - Human Studies 11 (4):389 - 418.