Results for 'Sophism (Greek philosophy'

30 found
Order:
  1. Language, Thought and Falsehood in Ancient Greek Philosophy.Nicholas Denyer - 1991 - Routledge.
    This book, originally published in 1991, sets forth the assumptions about thought and language that made falsehood seem so problematic to Plato and his contemporaries, and expounds the solution that Plato finally reached in the _Sophist._ Free from untranslated Greek, the book is accessible to all studying ancient Greek philosophy. As a well-documented case study of a definitive advance in logic, metaphysics and epistemology, the book will also appeal to philosophers generally.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Seer, Sage, Sophist, Philosopher: The Emergence of Philosophy in Classical Athens.Timothy W. Allen - 1996 - Dissertation, University of Cincinnati
    Many scholars have investigated the origins of philosophy in ancient Greece. The standard approach to this problem has been to see philosophical thinking as having evolved from some pre-existing intellectual enterprise, such as literature or technology. Scholars who approach the problem also generally identify one of the presocratics as the "first philosopher." ;No consensus has emerged regarding any of these issues. Closer examination reveals that although the enterprises in which these early contributors were engaged are interesting, they do not (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  41
    Thrasymachus.Nils Rauhut - 2004 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  4.  8
    Protagoras.Carol Poster - 2002 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  13
    Euthydemus. Plato - 1965 - Kessinger Publishing.
    We contrived at last, somehow or other, to agree in a general conclusion, that he who had wisdom had no need of fortune.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  6. Prodicus the Sophist: Texts, Translations, and Commentary.Robert Mayhew - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    The past fifty years have witnessed the flourishing of scholarship in virtually every area of ancient Greek philosophy, but the sophists have for the most part been neglected. This is certainly true of Prodicus of Ceos: of the four most well-known sophists--Protagoras, Gorgias, Prodicus, and Antiphon--he has received the least attention. Robert Mayhew provides a reassessment of his life and thought, and especially his views on language, religion, and ethics. This volume consists of ninety texts with facing translations--far more (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  61
    Miarą Jest Każdy Z Nas: Projekt Zwolenników Zmienności Rzeczy W Platońskim Teajtecie Na Tle Myśli Sofistycznej (Each of us is a measure. The project of advocates of change in Plato’s Theaetetus as compared with sophistic thought).Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2009 - Wydawn. Nauk. Uniwersytetu Mikołaja Kopernika.
    Each of us is a measure. The project of advocates of change in Plato’s Theaetetus as compared with sophistic thought -/- Summary -/- One of the most intriguing motives in Plato’s Theaetetus is its historical-based division of philosophy, which revolves around the concepts of rest (represented by Parmenides and his disciples) and change (represented by Protagoras, Homer, Empedocles, and Epicharmus). This unique approach gives an opportunity to reconstruct the views of marginalized trend of early Greek philosophy - so (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Plato's Sophist: The Drama of Original and Image.Stanley Rosen - 1983 - St. Augustine's Press.
  9.  21
    Stanley Fish and the Old Quarrel Between Rhetoric and Philosophy.David Roochnik - 1991 - Critical Review 5 (2):225-246.
    In Doing What Comes Naturally, Stanley Fish argues on behalf of rhetoric and against philosophy. The latter assumes an independent reality that can be perceived without distortion and then reported in a transparent verbal medium. The former insists that this is impossible. As Fish acknowledges, this debate is a version of the?old quarrel? that has raged since the dialogues of Plato and the orations of the sophists. The present paper first examines how the Greek sophist Isocrates actually formulated the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10. The Being of the Beautiful: Plato's Theaetetus, Sophist, and Statesman.Seth Benardete (ed.) - 1984 - University of Chicago Press.
    _The Being of the Beautiful_ collects Plato’s three dialogues, the _Theaetetus_, _Sophist_, and _Statesmen_, in which Socrates formulates his conception of philosophy while preparing for trial. Renowned classicist Seth Benardete’s careful translations clearly illuminate the dramatic and philosophical unity of these dialogues and highlight Plato’s subtle interplay of language and structure. Extensive notes and commentaries, furthermore, underscore the trilogy’s motifs and relationships. “The translations are masterpieces of literalness.... They are honest, accurate, and give the reader a wonderful sense of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11. Plato's Sophist.William S. Cobb - 1990 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Plato's Sophist provides a careful translation of the Sophist, one of Plato's most complex and difficult dialogues, and includes materials designed to facilitate its usefulness as a text in college courses. The translation employs a minimum of interpretative paraphrasing while being presented in clear, readable English. Special attention has been given to consistency in translating key Greek terms. The book presents a special list of these terms and discusses them in the endnotes. The result is a translation that enables the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  19
    Plato: Protagoras.Nicholas Denyer (ed.) - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Protagoras is one of Plato's most entertaining dialogues. It represents Socrates at a gathering of the most celebrated and highest-earning intellectuals of the day, among them the sophist Protagoras. In flamboyant displays of both rhetoric and dialectic, Socrates and Protagoras try to out-argue one another. Their arguments range widely, from political theory to literary criticism, from education to the nature of cowardice; but in view throughout this literary and philosophical masterpiece are the questions of what part knowledge plays in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13. Protagoras. PLATO - 1956 - Oxford University Press.
    In the fifth century BC professional educators, the sophists, travelled the Greek world claiming to teach success in public and private life. In this dialogue Plato shows the pretensions of the leading sophist, Protagoras, challenged by the critical arguments of Socrates. From criticism of the educational aims and methods of the sophists the dialogue broadens out to consider the nature of the good life, and the role of pleasure and intellect in the context of that life.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  58
    Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists.Marina McCoy - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Marina McCoy explores Plato's treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedras. She argues that Plato presents the philosopher and the sophist as difficult to distinguish, insofar as both use rhetoric as part of their arguments. Plato does not present philosophy as rhetoric-free, but rather shows that rhetoric is an integral part of philosophy. However, the philosopher and the sophist are distinguished (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  12
    Non-Being and the Structure of Privative Forms in Plato’s Sophist.Michael Wiitala - 2015 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):277-286.
    In Plato’s Statesman, the Eleatic Stranger explains that the division of all human beings into Greek and barbarian is mistaken in that it fails to divide reality into genuine classes or forms (eidē). The division fails because “barbarian” names a privative form, that is, a form properly indicated via negation: non-Greek. This paper examines how the Stranger characterizes privative forms in the Sophist. I argue that although the Stranger is careful to define privative forms as fully determinate, he nevertheless characterizes (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  44
    Protagoras. PLATO - 1956 - Oxford University Press.
    In this dialogue Plato shows the pretensions of the leading sophist, Protagoras, challenged by the critical arguments of Socrates. The dialogue broadens out to consider the nature of the good life and the role of intellect and pleasure.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  17. Division and Definition in the Sophist.Lesley Brown - 2010 - In David Charles (ed.), Definition in Greek Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  18. Division and Definition in Plato's Sophist and Statesman'.M. L. Gill - 2010 - In David Charles (ed.), Definition in Greek Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 172--201.
  19.  2
    Europe and the Stranger.Rodolphe Gasché - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (3):292-305.
    ABSTRACTWith few exceptions, the prominent role of the Stranger in Plato’s late dialogue on the Sophist has drawn little attention in Plato scholarship. Yet, in this dialogue Plato charges the expatriated Stranger, who, furthermore, lacks a patronym and thus is not identifiable, remaining a stranger to the end, with the task not only of rejecting all philosophy hitherto as nothing more than a kind of storytelling about Being, but also of committing the parricide of Parmenides, the father of Greek (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Definition and Division in the Sophist.Lesley Brown - 2010 - In David Charles (ed.), Definition in Greek Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 151--171.
  21. Sophist and Statesman.Mary Louise Gill - 2010 - In David Charles (ed.), Definition in Greek Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  22. Plato on the Metaphysical Foundation of Meaning and Truth.Blake Hestir - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    What is the nature of truth? Blake Hestir offers an investigation into Plato's developing metaphysical views, and examines Plato's conception of being, meaning, and truth in the Sophist, as well as passages from several other later dialogues including the Cratylus, Parmenides, and Theaetetus, where Plato begins to focus more directly on semantics rather than only on metaphysical and epistemological puzzles. Hestir's interpretation challenges both classical and contemporary interpretations of Plato's metaphysics and conception of truth, and highlights new parallels between Plato (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  1
    Apologii͡a Sofistov: Reli͡ativizm Kak Ontologicheskai͡a Sistema.Igorʹ Nikolaevich Rassokha - 2009 - Kharkivsʹka Nat͡sionalʹna Akademii͡a Misʹkoho Hospodarstva.
    Sophists’ apologia. -/- Sophists were the first paid teachers ever. These ancient Greek enlighteners taught wisdom. Protagoras, Antiphon, Prodicus, Hippias, Lykophron are most famous ones. Sophists views and concerns made a unified encyclopedic system aimed at teaching common wisdom, virtue, management and public speaking. Of the contemporary “enlighters”, Deil Carnegy’s educational work seems to be the most similar to sophism. Sophists were the first intellectuals – their trade was to sell knowledge. They introduced a new type of teacher-student relationship (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Machiavelli's Ethics.Erica Benner - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    Benner, Erica. Machiavelli’s Ethics. Princeton, 2009. 527p bibl index afp; ISBN 9780691141763, $75.00; ISBN 9780691141770 pbk, $35.00.

    Reviewed in CHOICE, April 2010

    This major new study of Machiavelli’s moral and political philosophy by Benner (Yale) argues that most readings of Machiavelli suffer from a failure to appreciate his debt to Greek sources, particularly the Socratic tradition of moral and political philosophy. Benner argues that when read in the light of his Greek sources, Machiavelli appears as much less the immoralist (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25.  2
    Du non-être à l'autre.Nestor-Luis Cordero - 2005 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 130 (2):175.
    Lorsque Platon essaie, dans le Sophiste, de réfuter l’argumentation de Parménide à propos de l’inexistence du non-être, il arrive à une conclusion inattendue : c’est la langue grecque qui, du fait d’identifier « ce qui est » aux étants, rend impossible d’exprimer « ce qui n’est pas ». Or, étant donné que le discours faux, propre à la sophistique, suppose que « ce qui n’est pas » existe, Platon examine les théories des philosophes qui l’ont précédé et il découvre que, (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  8
    Gorgias.C. Francis Higgins - 2006 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  27. Nihilizm i prawo silniejszego a praworządność w nauce sofistów.Cyprian Mielczarski - 2007 - Archiwum Historii Filozofii I Myśli Społecznej 52.
    The opposition between Socrates’ views and the sophists’ teachings reflects the conflict of ethics and politics and of philosophy and democracy, the form of state regarded by Plato as an outcome of sophistical relativism. Socrates saw the task of a politician in betterment of his own soul and of the citizens’ characters while the sophists taught their disciples utilitarian efficacy in politics and everyday life, essential to achieve success in the system of direct democracy. Cognitive nihilism was created by (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Los megáricos como sofistas erísticos: La respuesta pLatónica aL ataque de isócrates contra Los socráticos.Francisco Villar - 2016 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 25:185-213.
    Durante el siglo IV a. C. los intelectuales griegos discutieron sobre los alcances y características de la labor filosófica, en un intento por delimitar esta práctica distinguiéndola de otras. En este artículo me centraré en el retrato del sofista como contracara del filósofo. Analizaré específicamente la respuesta platónica al ataque que Isócrates dirige contra todos los discípulos de Sócrates en Contra los sofistas y Encomio de Helena. Defenderé que la estrategia de Platón para eludir dicha crítica consistió en construir en (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  22
    Women's Fashion.Robert C. Trundle - 2009 - Cultura 6 (2):46-67.
    A perennial influence on the aesthetics of fashion, fostered by Plato and Aristotle, is challenged today by a prevalent social constructionism. The latter embraces an impracticable biodenial as well as an incoherent epistemic relativism, reminiscent of Greek Sophism, whereby truth-claims about good fashion may be both true and false either in the same culture at different times or at the same time in different cultures. But a normative aesthetics of Aristotle and Plato, that affirms an epistemic realism, roots women's (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  8
    Catharsis and Moral Therapy I: A Platonic Account.Jan Helge Solbakk - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (1):57-67.
    This paper aims at analysing the ancient Greek notions of catharsis (clearing up, cleaning), to holon (the whole) and therapeia (therapy, treatment, healing) to assess whether they may be of help in addressing a set of questions concerning the didactics of medical ethics: What do medical students actually experience and learn when they attend classes of medical ethics? How should teachers of medical ethics proceed didactically to make students benefit morally from their teaching? And finally, to what extent and in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography