Results for 'Sparkles Stanford'

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  1.  2
    Sonic Decay.Ezra Teboul & Sparkles Stanford - 2015 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 9 (1).
    The authors discuss sonic decay as a compositional, performative and installation practice. Building off of the recording of a six hour performance, Andrew Stanford and Ezra Teboul assembled a short eight minute audio response which comes in two separate files. In addition to online links to the pieces, this paper provides a description of the compositional process along with an analysis of the response’s content and format. It then relates those to the greater concepts of sonic materialism, sound objects, (...)
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  2.  16
    Ambiguity in Greek Literature: Studies in Theory and Practice. By W. B. Stanford. Pp. Xi + 185. Oxford: Blackwell, 1939. 10s. 6d. [REVIEW]Henry Birkhead & W. B. Stanford - 1950 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 70:89-89.
  3.  67
    Exceeding Our Grasp: Science, History, and the Problem of Unconceived Alternatives.P. Kyle Stanford - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    The incredible achievements of modern scientific theories lead most of us to embrace scientific realism: the view that our best theories offer us at least roughly accurate descriptions of otherwise inaccessible parts of the world like genes, atoms, and the big bang. In Exceeding Our Grasp, Stanford argues that careful attention to the history of scientific investigation invites a challenge to this view that is not well represented in contemporary debates about the nature of the scientific enterprise. The historical (...)
  4.  14
    Exceeding Our Grasp.Kyle Stanford - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 137 (1):135-139.
    In the concluding chapter of Exceeding our Grasp Kyle Stanford outlines a positive response to the central issue raised brilliantly by his book, the problem of unconceived alternatives. This response, called "epistemic instrumentalism", relies on a distinction between instrumental and literal belief. We examine this distinction and with it the viability of Stanford's instrumentalism, which may well be another case of exceeding our grasp.
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  5. Underdetermination of Scientific Theory.Kyle Stanford - 2009 - In Edward N. Zalta (ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  6.  93
    Underdetermination.P. Kyle Stanford - 2009 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    At the heart of the underdetermination of scientific theory by evidence is the simple idea that the evidence available to us at a given time may fail to determine what beliefs we should hold in response to it. In a textbook example, if I all I know is that you spent $10 on apples and oranges and that apples cost $1 while oranges cost $2, then I know that you did not buy six oranges, but I do not know whether (...)
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  7.  64
    The Manifest Connection: Causation, Meaning, and David Hume.P. Kyle Stanford - 2002 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (3):339-360.
    P. Kyle Stanford - The Manifest Connection: Causation, Meaning, and David Hume - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40:3 Journal of the History of Philosophy 40.3 339-360 The Manifest Connection: Causation, Meaning, and David Hume P. Kyle Stanford 1. Introduction exciting recent hume scholarship has challenged the traditional view that Hume's theory of meaning leads him to deny the very intelligibility or coherence of supposing that there are objective causal powers or intrinsic necessary connections between causally related (...)
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  8. Synopsis and Discussion. Workshop: Underdetermination in Science 21-22 March, 2009. Center for Philosophy of Science.Greg Frost-Arnold, J. Brian Pitts, John Norton, John Manchak, Dana Tulodziecki, P. D. Magnus, David Harker & Kyle Stanford - unknown
    This document collects discussion and commentary on issues raised in the workshop by its participants. Contributors are: Greg Frost-Arnold, David Harker, P. D. Magnus, John Manchak, John D. Norton, J. Brian Pitts, Kyle Stanford, Dana Tulodziecki.
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  9. Refining the Causal Theory of Reference for Natural Kind Terms.P. Kyle Stanford & Philip Kitcher - 2000 - Philosophical Studies 97 (1):97-127.
  10. No Refuge for Realism: Selective Confirmation and the History of Science.P. Kyle Stanford - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 70 (5):913-925.
    Realists have responded to challenges from the historical record of successful but ultimately rejected theories with what I call the selective confirmation strategy: arguing that only idle parts of past theories have been rejected, while truly success‐generating features have been confirmed by further inquiry. I argue first, that this strategy is unconvincing without some prospectively applicable criterion of idleness for theoretical posits, and second, that existing efforts to provide one either convict all theoretical posits of idleness (Kitcher) or stand refuted (...)
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  11. An Antirealist Explanation of the Success of Science.P. Kyle Stanford - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (2):266-284.
    I develop an account of predictive similarity that allows even Antirealists who accept a correspondence conception of truth to answer the Realist demand (recently given sophisticated reformulations by Musgrave and Leplin) to explain the success of particular scientific theories by appeal to some intrinsic feature of those theories (notwithstanding the failure of past efforts by van Fraassen, Fine, and Laudan). I conclude by arguing that we have no reason to find truth a better (i.e., more plausible) explanation of a theory's (...)
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  12.  77
    For Pluralism and Against Realism About Species.P. Kyle Stanford - 1995 - Philosophy of Science 62 (1):70-91.
    I argue for accepting a pluralist approach to species, while rejecting the realism about species espoused by P. Kitcher and a number of other philosophers of biology. I develop an alternative view of species concepts as divisions of organisms into groups for study which are relative to the systematic explanatory interests of biologists at a particular time. I also show how this conception resolves a number of difficult puzzles which plague the application of particular species concepts.
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  13.  75
    Reference and Natural Kind Terms: The Real Essence of Locke's View.P. Kyle Stanford - 1998 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 79 (1):78–97.
    J. L. Mackie's famous claim that Locke ‘anticipates’ Kripke's Causal Theory of Reference rests, I suggest, upon a pair of important misunderstandings. Contra Mackie, as well as the more recent accounts of Paul Guyer and Michael Ayers, Lockean Real Essences consist of those features of an entity from which all of its experienceable properties can be logically deduced; thus a substantival Real Essence consists of features of a Real Constitution plus logically necessary objective connections between them and features of some (...)
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  14. Francis Galton’s Theory of Inheritance and the Problem of Unconceived Alternatives.P. Kyle Stanford - 2006 - Biology and Philosophy 21 (4):523-536.
    Elsewhere I have argued that the most significant threat to scientific realism arises from what I call the problem of unconceived alternatives: the repeated failure of past scientists and scientific communities to even conceive of alternatives to extant scientific theories, even when such alternatives were both (1) well-confirmed by the evidence available at the time and (2) sufficiently scientifically serious as to be actually embraced in the course of further investigation. In this paper I explore Francis Galton’s development and defense (...)
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  15.  17
    The Units of Selection and the Causal Structure of the World.P. Kyle Stanford - 2001 - Erkenntnis 54 (2):215-233.
    Genic selectionism holds that all selection can be understood as operating on particular genes. Critics (and conventional biological wisdom) insist that this misrepresents the actual causal structure of selective phenomena at higher levels of biological organization, but cannot convincingly defend this intuition. I argue that the real failing of genic selectionism is pragmatic – it prevents us from adopting the most efficient corpus of causal laws for predicting and intervening in the course of affairs – and I offer a Pragmatic (...)
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  16.  17
    Rethinking the Relationship Between Academia and Industry: Qualitative Case Studies of MIT and Stanford.Fengliang Zhu & Soaring Hawk - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (5):1497-1511.
    As knowledge has become more closely tied to economic development, the interrelationship between academia and industry has become stronger. The result has been the emergence of what Slaughter and Leslie call academic capitalism. Inevitably, tensions between academia and industry arise; however, universities such as MIT and Stanford with long traditions of industry interaction have been able to achieve a balance between academic and market values. This paper describes the strategies adopted by MIT and Stanford to achieve this balance. (...)
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  17. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.Edward N. Zalta (ed.) - 2004 - Stanford, CA: The Metaphysics Research Lab.
    The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy is an open access, dynamic reference work designed to organize professional philosophers so that they can write, edit, and maintain a reference work in philosophy that is responsive to new research. From its inception, the SEP was designed so that each entry is maintained and kept up to date by an expert or group of experts in the field. All entries and substantive updates are refereed by the members of a distinguished Editorial Board before (...)
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  18.  14
    Adult Tests of the Stanford Revision Applied to University Faculty Members.H. H. Caldwell - 1922 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 5 (4):247.
  19. An Absurd Consequence of Stanford’s New Induction Over the History of Science: A Reply to Sterpetti.Moti Mizrahi - 2019 - Axiomathes 29 (5):515-527.
    In this paper, I respond to Sterpetti’s attempt to defend Kyle P. Stanford’s Problem of Unconceived Alternatives and his New Induction over the History of Science from my reductio argument outlined in Mizrahi :59–68, 2016a). I discuss what I take to be the ways in which Sterpetti has misconstrued my argument against Stanford’s NIS, in particular, that it is a reductio, not a dilemma, as Sterpetti erroneously thinks. I argue that antirealists who endorse Stanford’s NIS still face (...)
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  20. Reflections on the Revolution at Stanford.F. A. Muller - 2011 - Synthese 183 (1):87-114.
    We inquire into the question whether the Aristotelean or classical \emph{ideal} of science has been realised by the Model Revolution, initiated at Stanford University during the 1950ies and spread all around the world of philosophy of science --- \emph{salute} P.\ Suppes. The guiding principle of the Model Revolution is: \emph{a scientific theory is a set of structures in the domain of discourse of axiomatic set-theory}, characterised by a set-theoretical predicate. We expound some critical reflections on the Model Revolution; the (...)
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  21.  93
    On Mizrahi’s Argument Against Stanford’s Instrumentalism.Fabio Sterpetti - 2019 - Axiomathes 29 (2):103-125.
    Mizrahi’s argument against Stanford’s challenge to scientific realism is analyzed. Mizrahi’s argument is worth of attention for at least two reasons: unlike other criticisms that have been made to Stanford’s view so far, Mizrahi’s argument does not question any specific claim of Stanford’s argument, rather it puts into question the very coherence of Stanford’s position, because it argues that since Stanford’s argument rests on the problem of the unconceived alternatives, Stanford’s argument is self-defeating. Thus, (...)
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  22.  32
    Fitness (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy).A. Rosenberg & F. Bouchard - 2011 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Web 17 (8):457-473.
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  23.  52
    Stanford’s Unconceived Alternatives From the Perspective of Epistemic Obligations.Matthew S. Sample - 2015 - Philosophy of Science 82 (5):856-866.
    Kyle Stanford’s reformulation of the problem of underdetermination has the potential to highlight the epistemic obligations of scientists. Stanford, however, presents the phenomenon of unconceived alternatives as a problem for realists, despite critics’ insistence that we have contextual explanations for scientists’ failure to conceive of their successors’ theories. I propose that responsibilist epistemology and the concept of “role oughts,” as discussed by Lorraine Code and Richard Feldman, can pacify Stanford’s critics and reveal broader relevance of the “new (...)
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  24.  13
    Reflections on a Revolution at Stanford.F. A. Muller - unknown
    We inquire into the question whether the Aristotelean or classical \emph{ideal} of science has been realised by the Model Revolution, initiated at Stanford University during the 1950ies and spread all around the world of philosophy of science --- \emph{salute} P.\ Suppes. The guiding principle of the Model Revolution is: \emph{a scientific theory is a set of structures in the domain of discourse of axiomatic set-theory}, characterised by a set-theoretical predicate. We expound some critical reflections on the Model Revolution; the (...)
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  25. Re-Enchanting Realism in Debate with Kyle Stanford.Emma Ruttkamp-Bloem - 2013 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 44 (1):201-224.
    In this article, against the background of a notion of ‘assembled’ truth, the evolutionary progressiveness of a theory is suggested as novel and promising explanation for the success of science. A new version of realism in science, referred to as ‘naturalised realism’ is outlined. Naturalised realism is ‘fallibilist’ in the unique sense that it captures and mimics the self-corrective core of scientific knowledge and its progress. It is argued that naturalised realism disarms Kyle Stanford’s anti-realist ‘new induction’ threats by (...)
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  26.  19
    Correction To: An Absurd Consequence of Stanford’s New Induction Over the History of Science: A Reply to Sterpetti.Moti Mizrahi - 2019 - Axiomathes 29 (5):529-529.
    In the Introduction section, 6th point under the paragraph “Given the parallels between Stanford’s PUA and the PUO, and those between Stanford’s NIS and the NIP, I have sketched the following reductio against Stanford’s NIS (Mizrahi 2016a, pp. 63–64):….. should read as -/- (6) Scientific antirealism is a philosophical theory.
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  27. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.Edward N. Zalta Uri Nodelman Colin Allen & John Perry - unknown
    Notice: This PDF version was distributed by request to members of the Friends of the SEP Society and by courtesy to SEP content contributors. It is solely for their fair use. Unauthorized distribution is prohibited. To learn how to join the Friends of the SEP Society and obtain authorized PDF versions of SEP entries, please visit https://leibniz.stanford.edu/friends/.
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  28.  27
    'Hume's Newtonianism and Anti-Newtonianism', In: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.Eric Schliesser - 2007 - In Thaddeus Metz (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  29. Predictive Similarity and the Success of Science: A Reply to Stanford.Stathis Psillos - 2001 - Philosophy of Science 68 (3):346-355.
    P. Kyle Stanford (2000) attempts to offer a truth-linked explanation of the success of science which, he thinks, can be welcome to antirealists. He proposes an explanation of the success of a theory T1 in terms of its predictive similarity to the true theory T of the relevant domain. After raising some qualms about the supposed antirealist credentials of Stanford's account, I examine his explanatory story in some detail and show that it fails to offer a satisfactory explanation (...)
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  30. Zimbardo's “Stanford Prison Experiment” and the Relevance of Social Psychology for Teaching Business Ethics.F. Neil Brady & Jeanne M. Logsdon - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (9):703 - 710.
    The prevailing pedagogical approach in business ethics generally underestimates or even ignores the powerful influences of situational factors on ethical analysis and decision-making. This is due largely to the predominance of philosophy-oriented teaching materials. Social psychology offers relevant concepts and experiments that can broaden pedagogy to help students understand more fully the influence of situational contexts and role expectations in ethical analysis. Zimbardo's Stanford Prison Experiment is used to illustrate the relevance of social psychology experiments for business ethics instruction.
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  31.  74
    Review of Kyle Stanford’s Exceeding Our Grasp: Science, History and the Problem of Unconceived Alternatives. [REVIEW]Ioannis Votsis - 2007 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 21 (1):103 – 106.
    In recent years, two challenges stand out against scientific realism: the argument from the underdetermination of theories by evidence (UTE) and the pessimistic induction argument (PI). In his book, Kyle Stanford accepts the gravity of these challenges, but argues that the most serious and powerful challenge to scientific realism has been neglected. The problem of unconceived alternatives (PUA), as he calls it, is introduced in chapter one and refined in chapter two. In short, PUA holds that throughout history scientists (...)
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  32.  69
    The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: A Developed Dynamic Reference Work.Colin Allen, Uri Nodelman & Edward N. Zalta - 2002 - Metaphilosophy 33 (1&2):210-228.
    The present information explosion on the World Wide Web poses a problem for the general public and the members of an academic discipline alike, of how to find the most authoritative, comprehensive, and up-to-date information about an important topic. At the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP), we have since 1995 been developing and implementing the concept of a dynamic reference work (DRW) to provide a solution to these problems, while maintaining free access for readers. A DRW is much more (...)
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  33.  6
    Author-Meets-Critics: Exceeding Our Grasp by Kyle Stanford.Arthur Fine, Peter Godfrey-Smith & Anjan Chakravartty - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 137 (1):149-158.
    Two of the most potent challenges faced by scientific realism are the underdetermination of theories by data, and the pessimistic induction based on theories previously held to be true, but subsequently acknowledged as false. Recently, Stanford (2006, Exceeding our grasp: Science, history, and the problem of unconceived alternatives. Oxford: Oxford University Press) has formulated what he calls the problem of unconceived alternatives: a version of the underdetermination thesis combined with a historical argument of the same form as the pessimistic (...)
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  34.  40
    Karen OFFEN, European Feminisms 1700-1950. A Political History, Stanford University Press, 2000, 554 P.Christine Bard - 2003 - Clio 17:284-286.
    Historienne, membre de l'Institute for Research on Women and Gender de Stanford, active au sein de l'International federation for research in women's history, Karen Offen concentre dans ce livre vingt-cinq ans de lectures et de recherches sur l'histoire du féminisme en Europe. Elle tire un grand profit de l'explosion récente des études sur l'histoire du féminisme et des colloques internationaux sur le féminisme en Europe. C'est le genre de livre que l'on lit, crayon à la main, et où l'..
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  35. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: A Developed Dynamic Reference Work.Colin Allen, Uri Nodelman & Edward N. Zalta - 2002 - In James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.), Metaphilosophy. Blackwell. pp. 210-228.
    In this entry, the authors outline the goals of a "dynamic reference work", and explain how the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy has been designed to achieve those goals.
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  36.  79
    Follow the Money: Engineering at Stanford and UC Berkeley During the Rise of Silicon Valley.Stephen B. Adams - 2009 - Minerva 47 (4):367-390.
    A comparison of the engineering schools at UC Berkeley and Stanford during the 1940s and 1950s shows that having an excellent academic program is necessary but not sufficient to make a university entrepreneurial. Key factors that made Stanford more entrepreneurial than Cal during this period were superior leadership and a focused strategy. The broader institutional context mattered as well. Stanford did not have the same access to state funding as public universities and some private universities. Therefore, in (...)
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  37.  46
    Alan Turing in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.Andrew Hodges - unknown
    The origin of my article lies in the appearance of Copeland and Proudfoot's feature article in Scientific American, April 1999. This preposterous paper, as described on another page, suggested that Turing was the prophet of 'hypercomputation'. In their references, the authors listed Copeland's entry on 'The Church-Turing thesis' in the Stanford Encyclopedia. In the summer of 1999, I circulated an open letter criticising the Scientific American article. I included criticism of this Encyclopedia entry. This was forwarded to Prof. Ed (...)
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  38.  24
    The Stanford Typed Dependencies Representation.Christopher D. Manning - unknown
    This paper examines the Stanford typed dependencies representation, which was designed to provide a straightforward description of grammatical relations for any user who could benefit from automatic text understanding. For such purposes, we argue that dependency schemes must follow a simple design and provide semantically contentful information, as well as offer an automatic procedure to extract the relations. We consider the underlying design principles of the Stanford scheme from this perspective, and compare it to the GR and PARC (...)
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  39.  33
    Emilie Du Châtelet: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.Karen Detlefsen - 2013 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    A survey article on the metaphysics, physics and methodology of Du Châtelet.
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  40.  4
    Benjamin Moffitt, The Global Rise of Populism. Performance, Political Style, and Representation, Palo Alto, Stanford University Press, 2016.Agustin Cosovschi - 2018 - Filozofija I Društvo 29 (4):640-642.
    BENJAMIN MOFFITT, THE GLOBAL RISE OF POPULISM. PERFORMANCE, POLITICAL STYLE, AND REPRESENTATION, PALO ALTO, STANFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2016.Agustin Cosovschi.
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  41.  42
    NIST Open Machine Translation 2008 Evaluation: Stanford University's System Description.Christopher Manning - unknown
    Michel Galley, Pi-Chuan Chang, Daniel Cer, Jenny R. Finkel, and Christopher D. Manning Computer Science and Linguistics Departments Stanford University..
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  42. Inconceivable Support Relations: Reply to Stanford –.Sahotra Sarkar - unknown
    Philosophers are drawn to the Atomic Theory like a dog to an old shoe, but my results about realism and anti-realism in Tracking Truth, and the distinctive position I have carved out on their basis, are independent of the fate of my comments about that historical case. I will defend those comments against Stanford’s objections below, but first I will explain the argument of my chapter, because its results undermine not only historically important antirealist positions, but also the approach (...)
     
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  43. Dynamics of Reason: The 1999 Kant Lectures at Stanford University.Michael Friedman - 2001 - CSLI Publications.
    This book introduces a new approach to the issue of radical scientific revolutions, or "paradigm-shifts," given prominence in the work of Thomas Kuhn. The book articulates a dynamical and historicized version of the conception of scientific a priori principles first developed by the philosopher Immanuel Kant. This approach defends the Enlightenment ideal of scientific objectivity and universality while simultaneously doing justice to the revolutionary changes within the sciences that have since undermined Kant's original defense of this ideal. Through a modified (...)
     
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  44. P. Kyle Stanford Exceeding Our Grasp: Science, History, and the Problem of Unconceived Alternatives.Patrick Enfield - 2008 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (4):881-895.
  45. Adorno, Theodor W. Can One Live After Auschwitz?: A Philosophical Reader. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press, 2003. Pp. Xxvii+ 525. Cloth, $75.00. Paper, $29.95. Antony, Louise M. And Norbert Hornstein, Editors. Chomsky and His Critics. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2003. Pp. Viii+ 342. Paper, $29.95. [REVIEW]James A. Arieti, Patrick A. Wilson & Daniel Baraz - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (4).
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  46. The Ambivalence of Creation: Debates Concerning Innovation and Artifice in Early China. By Michael Puett. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2001. Pp. Viii+ 299. Hardcover $55.00. Ancestors in Post-Contact Religion: Roots, Ruptures, and Modernity's Memory. Edited by Steven J. Friesen. Cambridge: Harvard University Press for the Center. [REVIEW]Indian Logic, A. Reader & Surrey Richmond - 2002 - Philosophy East and West 52 (4):501-503.
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  47.  42
    P. Kyle Stanford, Exceeding Our Grasp: Science, History, and the Problem of Unconceived Alternatives. New York: Oxford University Press , 248 Pp., $45.00. [REVIEW]David Harker - 2008 - Philosophy of Science 75 (2):251-253.
  48.  11
    [Book Review] the Cold War and American Science, the Military-Industrial-Academic Complex at MIT and Stanford[REVIEW]Stuart W. Leslie - 1995 - Science and Society 59 (2):237-240.
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  49. Dobie, Madeleine. Foreign Bodies: Gender, Language, and Culture in French Orientalism. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2001. Pp. 234. [REVIEW]Jane Bradley Winston - 2005 - Substance 34 (1):189-193.
  50.  36
    W. B. Stanford: Aristophanes, The Frogs. Edited with Introduction, Revised Text, Commentary, and Index. Second Edition. Pp. Lx + 211. London: Macmillan, 1963. Cloth, 13s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW]Nigel G. Wilson - 1965 - The Classical Review 15 (1):112-112.
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