Results for 'Spatial cognition'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  39
    Language, Culture and Spatial Cognition: Bringing Anthropology to the Table.Norbert Ross, Jeffrey T. Shenton, Werner Hertzog & Mike Kohut - 2015 - Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 10 (1):1-18.
    Languages vary in their semantic partitioning of the world. This has led to speculation that language might shape basic cognitive processes. Spatial cognition has been an area of research in which linguistic relativity – the effect of language on thought – has both been proposed and rejected. Prior studies have been inconclusive, lacking experimental rigor or appropriate research design. Lacking detailed ethnographic knowledge as well as failing to pay attention to intralanguage variations, these studies often fall short of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  73
    Introduction to the Topic on Modeling Spatial Cognition.Glenn Gunzelmann - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):628-631.
    Our ability to process spatial information is fundamental for understanding and interacting with the environment, and it pervades other components of cognitive functioning from language to mathematics. Moreover, technological advances have produced new capabilities that have created research opportunities and astonishing applications. In this Topic on Modeling Spatial Cognition, research crossing a variety of disciplines and methodologies is described, all focused on developing models to represent the capacities and limitations of human spatial cognition.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  71
    Spatial Cognition Through the Keyhole: How Studying a Real-World Domain Can Inform Basic Science—and Vice Versa.Madeleine Keehner - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):632-647.
    This paper discusses spatial cognition in the domain of minimally invasive surgery. It draws on studies from this domain to shed light on a range of spatial cognitive processes and to consider individual differences in performance. In relation to modeling, the aim is to identify potential opportunities for characterizing the complex interplay between perception, action, and cognition, and to consider how theoretical models of the relevant processes might prove valuable for addressing applied questions about surgical performance (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  15
    Unreflective Actions? Complex Motor Skill Acquisition to Enhance Spatial Cognition.David Moreau - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):349-359.
    Cognitive science has recently moved toward action-integrated paradigms to account for some of its most remarkable findings. This novel approach has opened up new venues for the sport sciences. In particular, a large body of literature has investigated the relationship between complex motor practice and cognition, which in the sports domain has mostly concerned the effect of imagery and other forms of mental practice on motor skill acquisition and emotional control. Yet recent evidence indicates that this relationship is bidirectional: (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Does Environmental Experience Shape Spatial Cognition? Frames of Reference Among Ancash Quechua Speakers.A. Shapero Joshua - 2016 - Cognitive Science 41 (3).
    Previous studies have shown that language contributes to humans' ability to orient using landmarks and shapes their use of frames of reference for memory. However, the role of environmental experience in shaping spatial cognition has not been investigated. This study addresses such a possibility by examining the use of FoRs in a nonverbal spatial memory task among residents of an Andean community in Peru. Participants consisted of 97 individuals from Ancash Quechua-speaking households who spoke Quechua and/or Spanish (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Does Environmental Experience Shape Spatial Cognition? Frames of Reference Among Ancash Quechua Speakers.A. Shapero Joshua - 2016 - Cognitive Science 41 (3).
    Previous studies have shown that language contributes to humans' ability to orient using landmarks and shapes their use of frames of reference for memory. However, the role of environmental experience in shaping spatial cognition has not been investigated. This study addresses such a possibility by examining the use of FoRs in a nonverbal spatial memory task among residents of an Andean community in Peru. Participants consisted of 97 individuals from Ancash Quechua-speaking households who spoke Quechua and/or Spanish (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  50
    Embodied Spatial Cognition.J. Gregory Trafton & M. Harrison Anthony - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):686-706.
    We present a spatial system called Specialized Egocentrically Coordinated Spaces embedded in an embodied cognitive architecture (ACT-R Embodied). We show how the spatial system works by modeling two different developmental findings: gaze-following and Level 1 perspective taking. The gaze-following model is based on an experiment by Corkum and Moore (1998), whereas the Level 1 visual perspective-taking model is based on an experiment by Moll and Tomasello (2006). The models run on an embodied robotic system.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  39
    Speech and Gesture in Spatial Language and Cognition Among the Yucatec Mayas.Olivier le Guen - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (5):905-938.
    In previous analyses of the influence of language on cognition, speech has been the main channel examined. In studies conducted among Yucatec Mayas, efforts to determine the preferred frame of reference in use in this community have failed to reach an agreement (Bohnemeyer & Stolz, 2006; Levinson, 2003 vs. Le Guen, 2006, 2009). This paper argues for a multimodal analysis of language that encompasses gesture as well as speech, and shows that the preferred frame of reference in Yucatec Maya (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  9.  72
    Exploring the Functional Advantages of Spatial and Visual Cognition From an Architectural Perspective.Scott D. Lathrop, Samuel Wintermute & John E. Laird - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):796-818.
    We present a general cognitive architecture that tightly integrates symbolic, spatial, and visual representations. A key means to achieving this integration is allowing cognition to move freely between these modes, using mental imagery. The specific components and their integration are motivated by results from psychology, as well as the need for developing a functional and efficient implementation. We discuss functional benefits that result from the combination of multiple content-based representations and the specialized processing units associated with them. Instantiating (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  38
    Relative Contribution of Perception/Cognition and Language on Spatial Categorization.Soonja Choi & Kate Hattrup - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (1):102-129.
    This study investigated the relative contribution of perception/cognition and language-specific semantics in nonverbal categorization of spatial relations. English and Korean speakers completed a video-based similarity judgment task involving containment, support, tight fit, and loose fit. Both perception/cognition and language served as resources for categorization, and allocation between the two depended on the target relation and the features contrasted in the choices. Whereas perceptual/cognitive salience for containment and tight-fit features guided categorization in many contexts, language-specific semantics influenced categorization (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11. The Hippocampal and Parietal Foundation of Spatial Cognition.N. Burgess (ed.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press UK.
    As we move around in our environment, and interact with it, many of the most important problems we face involve the processing of spatial information. We have to be able to navigate by perceiving and remembering the locations and orientations of the objects around us relative to ourself; we have to sense and act upon these objects; and we need to move through space to position ourselves in favourable locations or to avoid dangerous ones. While this appears so simple (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  12.  23
    Space—the Primal Frontier? Spatial Cognition and the Origins of Concepts.Frank C. Keil - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (2):241 – 250.
    The more carefully we look, the more impressive the repertoire of infant concepts seems to be. Across a wide range of tasks, infants seem to be using concepts corresponding to surprisingly high-level and abstract categories and relations. It is tempting to try to explain these abilities in terms of a core capacity in spatial cognition that emerges very early in development and then gets extended beyond reasoning about direct spatial arrays and events. Although such a spatial (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  9
    Development of Human Spatial Cognition in a Three-Dimensional World.Kate A. Longstaffe, Bruce M. Hood & Iain D. Gilchrist - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):556-556.
    Jeffery et al. accurately identify the importance of developing an understanding of spatial reference frames in a three-dimensional world. We examine human spatial cognition via a unique paradigm that investigates the role of saliency and adjusting reference frames. This includes work with adults, typically developing children, and children who develop non-typically (e.g., those with autism).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  10
    Symmetry and Human Spatial Cognition: An Alternative Perspective.Irwin Silverman - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):418-418.
    Wynn's thesis that the acquisition of the rules of symmetry comprised the formative factor in the evolution of human spatial cognition is questioned on several grounds, including the ubiquity of symmetry across species and the apparent hard-wired nature of its evolution in both humans and animals.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  10
    The Fossil Evidence for Spatial Cognition.Anne H. Weaver - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):424-425.
    Wynn's model for the evolution of spatial cognition is well supported by fossil evidence from brain endocasts, and from neurological studies of the cerebellum and the posterior parietal region of the cerebral cortex. Wynn's intriguing hypothesis that the spatial skill reflected in artifacts is an index of navigational ability, could be further explored by an analysis of lithic transport patterns.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. The Hippocampal and Parietal Foundations of Spatial Cognition.N. Burgess, K. J. Jeffery & J. O'Keefe (eds.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press UK.
    As we move around in our environment, and interact with it, many of the most important problems we face involve the processing of spatial information. We have to be able to navigate by perceiving and remembering the locations and orientations of the objects around us relative to ourself; we have to sense and act upon these objects; and we need to move through space to position ourselves in favourable locations or to avoid dangerous ones. While this appears so simple (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Unreflective Actions? Complex Motor Skill Acquisition to Enhance Spatial Cognition.Massimiliano Cappuccio - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):349-359.
    Cognitive science has recently moved toward action-integrated paradigms to account for some of its most remarkable findings. This novel approach has opened up new venues for the sport sciences. In particular, a large body of literature has investigated the relationship between complex motor practice and cognition, which in the sports domain has mostly concerned the effect of imagery and other forms of mental practice on motor skill acquisition and emotional control. Yet recent evidence indicates that this relationship is bidirectional: (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  25
    “What” and “Where” in Spatial Language and Spatial Cognition.Barbara Landau & Ray Jackendoff - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):217.
  19.  16
    Husserl's Lebenswelt and the Problem of Spatial Cognition – in Search of Universals.Elżbieta Łukasiewicz - 2010 - Polish Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):23-43.
    Perception and conceptualization of space are some of the most basic elements of human cognition. It has been long assumed that human spatial thinkingand frames of reference used to grasp and describe the location of an object in relation to other objects are of universal nature and so are projected in naturallanguages in basically the same manner; three principal dimensions in egocentric perceptual space were distinguished: up-down, front-back and left-right, reflecting our biological make-up. If differences in spatial (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  13
    Plasticity of Human Spatial Cognition: Spatial Language and Cognition Covary Across Cultures.Daniel B. M. Haun, Christian J. Rapold, Gabriele Janzen & Stephen C. Levinson - 2011 - Cognition 119 (1):70-80.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  21.  21
    Spatial Language Facilitates Spatial Cognition: Evidence From Children Who Lack Language Input.Dedre Gentner, Asli Özyürek, Özge Gürcanli & Susan Goldin-Meadow - 2013 - Cognition 127 (3):318-330.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  22. Spatial Cognition: Embodied and Situated.Barbara Tversky - 2009 - In Murat Aydede & P. Robbins (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 201--217.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  23.  8
    Spatial Symbol Systems and Spatial Cognition: A Computer Science Perspective on Perception-Based Symbol Processing.Christian Freksa, Thomas Barkowsky & Alexander Klippel - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):616-617.
    People often solve spatially presented cognitive problems more easily than their nonspatial counterparts. We explain this phenomenon by characterizing space as an inter-modality that provides common structure to different specific perceptual modalities. The usefulness of spatial structure for knowledge processing on different levels of granularity and for interaction between internal and external processes is described. Map representations are discussed as examples in which the usefulness of spatially organized symbols is particularly evident. External representations and processes can enhance internal representations (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  2
    Individual Differences in Spatial Cognition Influence Mental Simulation of Language.Nikola Vukovic & John N. Williams - 2015 - Cognition 142:110-122.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  32
    Spatial Cognition: Evidence From Visual Neglect.Peter W. Halligan, Gereon R. Fink, John C. Marshall & Giuseppe Vallar - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):125-133.
  26.  38
    Spatial Cognition in Apes and Humans.Dedre Gentner - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (5):192-194.
  27.  1
    Remembering Spatial Cognition as a Hippocampal Functional Component.Verner P. Bingman - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):473-474.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  28.  9
    Whence and Whither in Spatial Language and Spatial Cognition?Barbara Landau & Ray Jackendoff - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):255.
  29. Spatial Cognition.Daniel R. Montello - 2001 - In N. J. Smelser & B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. pp. 7--14771.
  30.  30
    A Theoretical Framework for the Study of Spatial Cognition.Maurizio Tirassa, Antonella Carassa & Giuliano Geminiani - 2000 - In [Book Chapter].
    We argue that the locomotion of organisms is better understood as a form of interaction with a subjective environment, rather than as a set of behaviors allegedly amenable to objective descriptions. An organism's interactions with its subjective environment are in turn understandable in terms of its cognitive architecture. We propose a large-scale classification of the possible types of cognitive architectures, giving a sketch of the subjective structure that each of them superimposes on space and of the relevant consequences on locomotion. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31.  28
    Making Sense of the Development of Spatial Cognition.David H. Uttal - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (7):316-317.
  32.  1
    Spatial Cognition.Nora S. Newcombe - 2002 - In J. Wixted & H. Pashler (eds.), Stevens' Handbook of Experimental Psychology. Wiley.
  33.  17
    Spatial Cognition: Parietal Cortex and Hippocampal Formation.Peter Collins - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (3):85-86.
  34.  1
    Language as Context, Language as Means: Spatial Cognition and Habitual Language Use.Eric Pederson - 1995 - Cognitive Linguistics 6 (1):33-62.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35.  3
    Sex Differences in Mobility and Spatial Cognition.Layne Vashro, Lace Padilla & Elizabeth Cashdan - forthcoming - Human Nature.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  1
    Corrigendum: Where Am I? Who Am I? The Relation Between Spatial Cognition, Social Cognition, and Individual Differences in the Built Environment.Michael J. Proulx, Orlin S. Todorov, Amanda Taylor Aiken & Alexandra A. de Sousa - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  1
    Where Am I? Who Am I? The Relation Between Spatial Cognition, Social Cognition and Individual Differences in the Built Environment.Michael J. Proulx, Orlin S. Todorov, Amanda Taylor Aiken & Alexandra A. de Sousa - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  5
    Has a Fully Three-Dimensional Space Map Never Evolved in Any Species? A Comparative Imperative for Studies of Spatial Cognition.Cynthia F. Moss - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):557-557.
    I propose that it is premature to assert that a fully three-dimensional map has never evolved in any species, as data are lacking to show that space coding in all animals is the same. Instead, I hypothesize that three-dimensional representation is tied to an animal's mode of locomotion through space. Testing this hypothesis requires a large body of comparative data.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  2
    The Role of Cerebral Lateralization in Expression of Spatial Cognition.Halle D. Brown - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):240.
  40.  1
    Cues, Context, and Long-Term Memory: The Role of the Retrosplenial Cortex in Spatial Cognition.Adam M. P. Miller, Lindsey C. Vedder, L. Matthew Law & David M. Smith - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  41.  1
    Language, Culture, and the Embodiment of Spatial Cognition.Chris Sinha & Kristine Jensen de López - 2001 - Cognitive Linguistics 11 (1-2).
  42.  1
    Why Go There? Evolution of Mobility and Spatial Cognition in Women and Men.Elizabeth Cashdan & Steven J. C. Gaulin - forthcoming - Human Nature.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Spatial Cognition.Carol L. Colby & Carl R. Olson - 1999 - In M. J. Zigmond & F. E. Bloom (eds.), Fundamental Neuroscience. pp. 1363--1383.
  44. Modeling Spatial Cognition [Special Issue](Vol. 3)(No. 4).G. Gunzelmann - forthcoming - Topics in Cognitive Science.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Senses of Space: Multiplying Models of Spatial Cognition in Oceania.Alexander Mawyer & Richard Feinberg - 2014 - Ethos 42 (3):243-252.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. 8 Spatial Cognition: The Mental.David R. Olson & Ellen Bialystok - 1982 - In B. De Gelder (ed.), Knowledge and Representation. Routledge & Kegan Paul. pp. 121.
  47. A View From the Islands: Spatial Cognition in the Western Pacific.Bradd Shore - 2014 - Ethos 42 (3):376-397.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Spatial Reasoning in Small-Size and Large-Size Environments: In Search of Early Prefigurations of Spatial Cognition in Small-Size Environments.G. Steiner - 1987 - In B. Inhelder, D. De Caprona & A. Cornu-Wells (eds.), Piaget Today. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 203--216.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Real-World Graph Comprehension: High-Level Questions, Complex Graphs, and Spatial Cognition.S. B. Trickett, R. M. Ratwani & J. G. Trafton - forthcoming - Cognitive Science.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  17
    Embodied and Disembodied Cognition: Spatial Perspective-Taking.Barbara Tversky & Bridgette Martin Hard - 2009 - Cognition 110 (1):124-129.
1 — 50 / 1000