Results for 'Speech acts (Linguistics'

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  1. Speech Acts: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language.John R. Searle - 1969 - Cambridge University Press.
    Written in an outstandingly clear and lively style, this 1969 book provokes its readers to rethink issues they may have regarded as long since settled.
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  2.  17
    Truth and Speech Acts: Studies in the Philosophy of Language.Robert Mößgen (ed.) - 2007 - Routledge.
    This innovative collection addresses such themes as: the relation between the concept of truth and the success conditions of assertions and kindred speech acts the linguistic devices of expressing the truth of a proposition the relation ...
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  3.  43
    Truth and Speech Acts: Studies in the Philosophy of Language.Dirk Greimann & Geo Siegwart (eds.) - 2007 - Routledge.
    This innovative collection addresses such themes as: the relation between the concept of truth and the success conditions of assertions and kindred speech acts the linguistic devices of expressing the truth of a proposition the relation ...
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  4.  52
    Propositional Structure and Illocutionary Force: A Study of the Contribution of Sentence Meaning to Speech Acts.Jerrold J. Katz - 1977 - Harvester.
    Katz offers such a grammatical account, in which makes it possible for the first time to explain the illocutionary potential of sentences within grammar.
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  5.  94
    Speech Acts, Meaning, and Intentions: Critical Approaches to the Philosophy of John R. Searle.Armin Burkhardt (ed.) - 1990 - W. De Gruyter.
    Introduction The analytical way of thinking has been one of the most fruitful paradigms in this century in philosophy and in different sciences, ...
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  6. Language and Intentionality: A Critical Examination of John Searle's Later Theory of Speech Acts and Intentionality.Carleton B. Christensen - 1991 - Königshausen & Neumann.
     
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  7. Insensitive Semantics: A Defense of Semantic Minimalism and Speech Act Pluralism.Herman Cappelen & Ernest Lepore - 2005 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Insensitive Semantics_ is an overview of and contribution to the debates about how to accommodate context sensitivity within a theory of human communication, investigating the effects of context on communicative interaction and, as a corollary, what a context of utterance is and what it is to be in one. Provides detailed and wide-ranging overviews of the central positions and arguments surrounding contextualism Addresses broad and varied aspects of the distinction between the semantic and non-semantic content of language Defends a distinctive (...)
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  8.  15
    Superlative Quantifiers and Meta-Speech Acts.Ariel Cohen & Manfred Krifka - 2014 - Linguistics and Philosophy 37 (1):41-90.
    Recent research has shown that the superlative quantifiers at least and at most do not have the same type of truth conditions as the comparative quantifiers more than and fewer than. We propose that superlative quantifiers are interpreted at the level of speech acts. We relate them to denegations of speech acts, as in I don’t promise to come, which we analyze as excluding the speech act of a promise to come. Calling such conversational (...) that affect future permissible speech acts “meta-speech acts,” we introduce the meta-speech act of a GRANT of a proposition as a denial to assert the negation of that proposition. Superlative quantifiers are analyzed as quantifiers over GRANTS. Thus, John petted at least three rabbits means that the minimal number n such that the speaker GRANTs the proposition that John petted n rabbits is n = 3. We formalize this interpretation in terms of commitment states and commitment spaces, and show how the truth conditions that are derived from it are partly entailed and partly conversationally implicated. We demonstrate how the theory accounts for a wide variety of distributional phenomena of superlative quantifiers, including the contexts in which they can be embedded. (shrink)
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  9.  46
    Exclamatives, Degrees and Speech Acts.Jessica Rett - 2011 - Linguistics and Philosophy 34 (5):411-442.
    The goal of this paper is an account of the semantics and pragmatics of exclamation. I focus on two key observations: first, that sentence exclamations like Wow, John bakes delicious desserts! and exclamatives like What delicious desserts John bakes! express that a particular proposition has violated the speaker’s expectations; and second, that exclamatives are semantically restricted in a way that sentence exclamations are not. In my account of these facts, I propose a characterization of illocutionary force of exclamation, a function (...)
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  10.  22
    Artificial Speech and Its Authors.Philip J. Nickel - 2013 - Minds and Machines 23 (4):489-502.
    Some of the systems used in natural language generation (NLG), a branch of applied computational linguistics, have the capacity to create or assemble somewhat original messages adapted to new contexts. In this paper, taking Bernard Williams’ account of assertion by machines as a starting point, I argue that NLG systems meet the criteria for being speech actants to a substantial degree. They are capable of authoring original messages, and can even simulate illocutionary force and speaker meaning. Background intelligence embedded (...)
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  11. Speech Acts.Mitchell Green - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Speech acts are a staple of everyday communicative life, but only became a topic of sustained investigation, at least in the English-speaking world, in the middle of the Twentieth Century.[1] Since that time “speech act theory” has been influential not only within philosophy, but also in linguistics, psychology, legal theory, artificial intelligence, literary theory and many other scholarly disciplines.[2] Recognition of the importance of speech acts has illuminated the ability of language to do other things (...)
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  12.  23
    Telling More Than the Truth: Implicature, Speech Acts, and Ethics in Professional Communication. [REVIEW]Kathryn Riley - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (3):179 - 196.
    Ethicists have long observed that unethical communication may result from texts that contain no overt falsehoods but are nevertheless misleading. Less clear, however, has been the way that context and text work together to create misleading communication. Concepts from linguistics can be used to explain implicature and indirect speech acts, two patterns which, though in themselves not unethical, may allow misinterpretations and, therefore, create potentially unethical communication. Additionally, sociolinguistic theory provides insights into why writers in business and other (...)
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  13. From Utterances to Speech Acts.Mikhail Kissine - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    Most of the time our utterances are automatically interpreted as speech acts: as assertions, conjectures and testimonies; as orders, requests and pleas; as threats, offers and promises. Surprisingly, the cognitive correlates of this essential component of human communication have received little attention. This book fills the gap by providing a model of the psychological processes involved in interpreting and understanding speech acts. The theory is framed in naturalistic terms and is supported by data on language development (...)
     
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  14. Meaning and Speech Acts 2 Volume Paperback Set.Daniel Vanderveken - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    The primary units of meaning in the use and comprehension of language are speech acts of the type called illocutionary acts. In Foundations of Illocutionary Logic John Searle and Daniel Vanderveken presented the first formalised logic of a general theory of speech acts. In Meaning and Speech Acts Daniel Vanderveken further develops the logic of speech acts and the logic of propositions to construct a general semantic theory of natural languages. Volume (...)
     
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  15.  5
    Modularity and Speech Acts.Robert M. Harnish - 1995 - Pragmatics and Cognition 3 (1):1-29.
    Modules, as Marr and Fodor conceive of them, lie between sensory and central processes. Modules have the functional property of representing that portion of the world which turns them on, and nine non-functional or structural properties that facilitate carrying out that function. Fodor has proposed that the processing of linguistic information is carried out by a language module , which therefore has the functional and structural features of modules. We argue that the proposed LM does not have the functional property (...)
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  16.  96
    Ten Conditions on a Theory of Speech Acts.Barry Smith - 1984 - Theoretical Linguistics 11 (3):309-330.
    It is now generally recognized that figures such as Reid, Peirce, and Reinach formulated theories of speech acts avant la lettre of Austin and Searle, in Reid and Reinach’s cases under the heading ‘theory of social acts’. Here we address the question as to what conditions would have to be satisfied for such theories to count as ‘theories of speech acts’ in the now familiar sense.
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  17.  10
    Un enfoque semiótico Y pragmático de la interpretación de textos jurídicos.José López Hernández - 2008 - Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 42:135-152.
    This paper looks at the interpretation of legal texts, with a special emphasis on the legislative ones, from the semiotic and pragmatic points of view. The interpretation of a legislative text must start by considering it as a product of a communication act, performed through linguistic signs, and therefore it has to be studied within basic semiotic categories. Secondly, legislations are texts, and they must therefore be analyzed with the aid of textual linguistics. Thirdly, legislative texts and their legal utterances (...)
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  18. How to Do Things with Words.J. L. Austin - 1962 - Clarendon Press.
    For this second edition, the editors have returned to Austin's original lecture notes, amending the printed text where it seemed necessary.
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  19.  26
    Participant Roles, Frames, and Speech Acts.James D. Mccawley - 1999 - Linguistics and Philosophy 22 (6):595-619.
  20.  52
    Renewing Meaning: A Speech-Act Theoretic Approach.J. Barker Stephen - 2004 - Clarendon Press.
    Stephen Barker presents his first, ambitious book in the philosophy of language, setting out a radical alternative to standard theories of meaning.
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  21. Cognitive Grammar, Speech Acts, and Interpersonal Dynamics: A Study of Two Directive Constructions in Polish.Agata Kochańska - 2015 - Cognitive Linguistics 26 (1):61-94.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Cognitive Linguistics Jahrgang: 26 Heft: 1 Seiten: 61-94.
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  22. Foundations of Speech Act Theory: Philosophical and Linguistic Perspectives.Savas L. Tsohatzidis (ed.) - 1994 - Routledge.
  23.  21
    Speech and System.Peter Bornedal - 1997 - Museum Tusculanum Press.
    2.2.4) Differance as Supplement 246 2.3) Anti-logics 248 2.3.1) Argumentative Incompatibility 249 2.3.2) Counter-Finality 250 2.3.3) Performative ...
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  24. The Concept of Situation in Linguistics.Claude Germain - 1979 - University of Ottawa Press.
     
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  25.  42
    Group Speech Acts.Justin Hughes - 1984 - Linguistics and Philosophy 7 (4):379 - 395.
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  26.  33
    A Formal Theory of Speech Acts.S. -Y. Kuroda - 1986 - Linguistics and Philosophy 9 (4):495 - 524.
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  27. Speech Acts (Definition and Classification).Alessandro Capone - 2005 - In Alex Barber (ed.), Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Elsevier.
     
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  28. Imperative Frames and Modality: Direct Vs. Indirect Speech Acts in Russian, Danish, and English.Per Durst-Andersen - 1995 - Linguistics and Philosophy 18 (6):611-653.
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  29.  18
    Features of Written Argument.Donald Ross & Deborah Rossen-Knill - 2016 - Argumentation 30 (2):181-205.
    To complement theoretically driven work on argument, we present a datadriven description of published, written argument. We analyze political or philosophical treatises, articles in scholarly journals, and U.S. Supreme Court decisions. The description has emerged out of an inductive and a posteriori process based in grounded theory. The result is a suite of thirty-eight features that begins with conditions antecedent to writing and continues through to the consequences for the reader. We relate observational data to theories and practices from the (...)
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  30. Assertion: New Philosophical Essays.Jessica Brown & Herman Cappelen (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Assertion is a fundamental feature of language. This volume will be the place to look for anyone interested in current work on the topic.
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  31.  27
    Words and Thoughts: Subsentences, Ellipsis, and the Philosophy of Language.Robert Stainton - 2006 - Published in the United States by Oxford University Press.
    It is a near truism of philosophy of language that sentences are prior to words--that they are the only things that fundamentally have meaning. Robert's Stainton's study interrogates this idea, drawing on a wide body of evidence to argue that speakers can and do use mere words, not sentences, to communicate complex thoughts.
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  32.  10
    Reference and Computation: An Essay in Applied Philosophy of Language.Amichai Kronfeld - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book deals with a major problem in the study of language: the problem of reference. The ease with which we refer to things in conversation is deceptive. Upon closer scrutiny, it turns out that we hardly ever tell each other explicitly what object we mean, although we expect our interlocutor to discern it. Amichai Kronfeld provides an answer to two questions associated with this: how do we successfully refer, and how can a computer be programmed to achieve this? Beginning (...)
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  33. Implicature: Intention, Convention, and Principle in the Failure of Gricean Theory.Wayne A. Davis - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    H. P. Grice virtually discovered the phenomenon of implicature (to denote the implications of an utterance that are not strictly implied by its content). Gricean theory claims that conversational implicatures can be explained and predicted using general psycho-social principles. This theory has established itself as one of the orthodoxes in the philosophy of language. Wayne Davis argues controversially that Gricean theory does not work. He shows that any principle-based theory understates both the intentionality of what a speaker implicates and the (...)
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  34.  14
    Barriers to Communication in a Computer Age.Jacob L. Mey & Hiroshi Tamura - 1992 - AI and Society 6 (1):62-77.
    When people speak about “communication barriers”, what they usually think about are such things as the limitations set by human nature itself, or the constraints that are inherent in the tools we use for communicating. As an example of the first, consider the limited range of the naked human voice; for the second, we may think of the limitations imposed by such primitive communicative devices as the bonfire, the heliograph, or an old-fashioned megaphone.Our contribution draws attention to the fact that, (...)
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  35. Sprache Und Praxisform.Peter Grönert & Frank Kannetzky (eds.) - 2005 - Leipziger Universitätsverlag.
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  36.  76
    Linguistic Meaning.Keith Allan - 1986 - Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    Chapter Beginning an account of linguistic meaning: speaker, hearer, context, and utterance Pity the poor analyst, who has to do the best he can with ...
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  37.  21
    Explorations in Semantics and Pragmatics.Geoffrey N. Leech - 1980 - Benjamins.
    INTRODUCTION The four papers in this book are slightly revised and updated versions of papers I wrote in the period 1973-77, while I was coming to terms ...
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  38. Contrastive Semantics and Pragmatics.Katarzyna Jaszczolt & Ken Turner (eds.) - 1996 - Pergamon Press.
    v. 1. Meanings and representations -- v. 2. Discourse strategies.
     
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  39.  31
    On Quoting: An Essay on the Ontology of Words.Harald Johannessen - 1976 - Universitetsforlaget.
    The essay tries to blend diverse strands of thought. First comes a criticism of Quine's view(s) on quotation. This develops, somehow, into an ontology for linguistic items. Out of this, again, grows some more general reflections on the notions of speaker and speaking the same language: the identification of someone as a speaker becomes a central task, and the recognition of someone as speaking is of crucial importance in the acknowledgement that something is said. Running through it all, more as (...)
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  40. Statements and Exhortations.Erik Ryding - 1980 - Doxa.
     
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  41. Intention and Communication: An Essay in the Phenomenology of Language.Thomas Wetterström - 1977 - Doxa.
  42. Intention and Communication.Thomas Wetterström - 1973 - Göteborg.
  43. Soziale Akte, Sprechakte Und Textillokutionen A. Reinachs Rechtsphilosophie Und Die Moderne Linguistik.Armin Burkhardt - 1986
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  44.  93
    What Man Does.Eric McCready - 2008 - Linguistics and Philosophy 31 (6):671-724.
    This paper considers the meaning and use of the English particle man . It is shown that the particle does quite different things when it appears in sentence-initial and sentence-final position; the first use involves expression of an emotional attitude as well as, on a particular intonation, intensification; this use is analyzed using a semantics for degree predicates along with a separate dimension for the expressive aspect. Further restrictions on modification with the sentence-initial particle involving monotonicity and evidence are introduced (...)
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  45.  82
    Hereby Explained: An Event-Based Account of Performative Utterances. [REVIEW]Regine Eckardt - 2012 - Linguistics and Philosophy 35 (1):21-55.
    Several authors propose that performative speech acts are self-guaranteeing due to their self-referential nature (Searle 1989; Jary 2007). The present paper offers an analysis of self-referentiality in terms of truth conditional semantics, making use of Davidsonian events. I propose that hereby can denote the ongoing act of information transfer (more mundanely, the utterance) which thereby enters the meaning of the sentence. The analysis will be extended to cover self-referential sentences without the adverb hereby. While self-referentiality can be integrated (...)
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  46.  53
    Evidential Scalar Implicatures.Martina Faller - 2012 - Linguistics and Philosophy 35 (4):285-312.
    This paper develops an analysis of a scalar implicature that is induced by the use of reportative evidentials such as the Cuzco Quechua enclitic = si and the German modal sollen. Reportatives, in addition to specifying the speaker’s source of information for a statement as a report by someone else, also usually convey that the speaker does not have direct evidence for the proposition expressed. While this type of implicature can be calculated using the same kind of Gricean reasoning that (...)
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  47.  11
    A Unified Analysis of Conditionals as Topics.Christian Ebert, Cornelia Ebert & Stefan Hinterwimmer - 2014 - Linguistics and Philosophy 37 (5):353-408.
    We bring out syntactic and semantic similarities of two types of conditionals with fronted antecedents [normal indicative conditionals and biscuit conditionals ] and two types of left dislocation constructions in German, which mark two types of topicality. On the basis of these similarities we argue that NCs and BCs are aboutness topics and relevance topics, respectively. Our analysis extends the approach to aboutness topicality of Endriss to relevance topics to derive the semantic and pragmatic contribution of left-dislocated DPs and applies (...)
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  48. ‘I Bet They Are Going to Read It’: Reported Direct Speech in Titles of Research Papers in Linguistic Pragmatics.Hanna Pułaczewska - 2009 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 5 (2):271-291.
    ‘I Bet They Are Going to Read It’: Reported Direct Speech in Titles of Research Papers in Linguistic Pragmatics Titles of research articles in the humanities, including linguistics, tend to be more creative and less informative than corresponding titles in exact sciences or medicine. In linguistics, pragmatic studies are an area where reported discourse, i.e. direct speech in the form of a full speech act, occurs relatively frequently in titles of research papers. This paper analyses the metonymic (...)
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  49.  24
    John Langshaw Austin.Federica Berdini & Claudia Bianchi - 2013 - IEP- Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    J. L. Austin was one of the more influential British philosophers of his time, due to his rigorous thought, extraordinary personality, and innovative philosophical method. According to John Searle, he was both passionately loved and hated by his contemporaries. Like Socrates, he seemed to destroy all philosophical orthodoxy without presenting an alternative, equally comforting, orthodoxy. -/- Austin is best known for two major contributions to contemporary philosophy: first, his ‘linguistic phenomenology’, a peculiar method of philosophical analysis of the concepts and (...)
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  50.  96
    Iffication, Preiffication, Qualiffication, Reiffication, and Deiffication.John Corcoran - 2008 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 14 (4):435-6.
    Iffication, Preiffication, Qualiffication, Reiffication, and Deiffication. -/- Roughly, iffication is the speech-act in which—by appending a suitable if-clause—the speaker qualifies a previous statement. The clause following if is called the qualiffication. In many cases, the intention is to retract part of the previous statement—called the preiffication. I can retract part of “I will buy three” by appending “if I have money”. This initial study focuses on logical relations among propositional contents of speech-acts—not their full conversational implicatures, which (...)
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