Results for 'Sports'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  62
    Sport; a Philosophic Inquiry.Paul Weiss - 1969 - Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.
    In a wide-ranging study of unusual interest, Paul Weiss, Sterling Professor of Philosophy at Yale University, applies the principles and methods of philosophy to athletics. Every culture, he notes, has games of some kind; few activities seem to interest both children and young men as much as sports do; and few attract so many spectators, rich and poor. Yet none of the great philosophers, claiming to take all knowledge and being as their province, have made more than a passing (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   68 citations  
  2.  83
    Sports, Virtues and Vices: Morality Plays.Mike McNamee - 2008 - Routledge.
    Sports have long played an important role in society. By exploring the evolving link between sporting behaviour and the prevailing ethics of the time this comprehensive and wide-ranging study illuminates our understanding of the wider social significance of sport. The primary aim of _Sports, Virtues and Vices_ is to situate ethics at the heart of sports via ‘virtue ethical’ considerations that can be traced back to the gymnasia of ancient Greece. The central theme running through the book is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  3. Ethics, Physical Education and Sports Coaching.Sports Coaching - 1998 - In M. J. McNamee & S. J. Parry (eds.), Ethics and Sport. E & Fn Spon. pp. 117.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  90
    Sport, Rules, and Values: Philosophical Investigations Into the Nature of Sport.Graham McFee - 2004 - Routledge.
    Sport, Rules and Values presents a philosophical perspective on some issues concerning the character of sport. Central questions for the text are motivated from real life sporting examples as described in newspaper reports. For instance, the (supposed) subjectivity of umpiring decisions is explored via an examination of the judging ice-skating at the Salt Lake City Olympic Games of 2002. Throughout, the presentation is rich in concrete cases from sporting situations, including baseball, football, and soccer. While granting the constitutive nature of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  5.  39
    Sporting Embodiment: Sports Studies and the (Continuing) Promise of Phenomenology.Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson - 2009 - Qualitative Research in Sport and Exercise 1 (3):279-296.
    Whilst in recent years sports studies have addressed the calls ‘to bring the body back in’ to theorisations of sport and physical activity, the ‘promise of phenomenology’ remains largely under-realised with regard to sporting embodiment. Relatively few accounts are grounded in the ‘flesh’ of the lived sporting body, and phenomenology offers a powerful framework for such analysis. A wide-ranging, multi-stranded, and interpretatively contested perspective, phenomenology in general has been taken up and utilised in very different ways within different disciplinary (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  6. E-Sports Are Not Sports.Jim Parry - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (1):3-18.
    The conclusion of this paper will be that e-sports are not sports. I begin by offering a stipulation and a definition. I stipulate that what I have in mind, when thinking about the concept of sport, is ‘Olympic’ sport. And I define an Olympic Sport as an institutionalised, rule-governed contest of human physical skill. The justification for the stipulation lies partly in that it is uncontroversial. Whatever else people might think of as sport, no-one denies that Olympic Sport (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  7. Sports Ethics: An Anthology.Jan Boxill (ed.) - 2002 - Blackwell.
    Representing the thinking of philosophers, psychologists, sociologists, coaches, and sports writers, these essays bring together a wide range of approaches to ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  8.  82
    The Sport Nexus and Gender Injustice.Ann Travers - 2008 - Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):79-101.
    Male-dominated and sex segregated elite professional and amateur sport1 in North America constitutes a "sport nexus" (Burstyn, 1999; Heywood & Dworkin, 2003) that combines economic and cultural influence to reinforce and perpetuate gender injustice. The sport nexus is an androcentric sex-segregated commercially powerful set of institutions that is highly visible and at the same time almost completely taken for granted to the extent that its anti-democratic impetus goes virtually unnoticed. The sport nexus’s hegemonic role in defining sporting norms (Coakley & (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  9. Sport, Make-Believe, and Volatile Attitudes.Nils-Hennes Stear - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (3):275-288.
    The outcomes of sports and competitive games excite intense emotions in many people, even when those same people acknowledge that those outcomes are of trifling importance. I call this incongruity between the judged importance of the outcome and the intense reactions it provokes the Puzzle of Sport. The puzzle can be usefully compared to another puzzle in aesthetics: the Paradox of Fiction, which asks how it is we become emotionally caught up with events and characters we know to be (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10. Man, Sport, and Existence.Howard S. Slusher - 1967 - Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger.
  11.  7
    Sport and the Body: A Philosophical Symposium.Ellen W. Gerber - 1972 - Lea & Febiger.
  12.  2
    Sports, Ethics and Education.Peter J. Arnold - 1997 - Cassell.
    Examines the relationship between sport and education from both social and moral points of view. The text argues that sport has such a vital role to play in society that it should be an integral part of the curriculum. It presents guidelines for an effective teaching of sports in schools.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  13.  34
    Sporting Knowledge and the Problem of Knowing How.Gunnar Breivik - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (2):143-162.
    In the Concept of Mind from 1949 Gilbert Ryle distinguished between knowing how and knowing that. What was Ryle’s basic idea and how is the discussion going on in philosophy today? How can sport philosophy use the idea of knowing how? My goal in this paper is first to bring Ryle and the post-Rylean discussion to light and then show how phenomenology can give some input to the discussion. The article focuses especially on the two main interpretations of knowing how, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  14.  54
    Sport and Work.Bero Rigauer - 1981 - Columbia University Press.
    His argument rests on several premises: that achievement in sport has become a model for achievement in the workplace; that the two worlds share the same ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  15.  35
    Sprints, Sports, and Suits.Mitchell N. Berman - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (1):163-176.
    Philosophy of sport orthodoxy maintains the following three theses: (1) all sports (or all refereed sports) are games; (2) games are as Suits defined them; and (3) sprints are sports. This article argues that these three theses cannot be jointly maintained and offers exploratory thoughts regarding what might follow.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  16.  24
    Sport as Meaningful Narratives.John Gleaves - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):29-43.
    Though many scholars have made claims as to the nature of sport, this article argues that these claims tend to narrowly focus on modern ideas derived primarily from Western competitive sport. Thus, most notions of sport fail to capture how various historical and non-Western cultures valued sport. In an attempt to provide a broader and more durable description of the nature of sport, this article argues that sports are fundamentally about telling a story about ourselves. These stories are meaningful (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  17.  72
    Sports and Drugs: Are the Current Bans Justified?Michael Lavin - 1987 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 14 (1):34-43.
    Current bans on sports and drugs rest on inadequate grounds. Prohibitions on drugs in sports should rely more on what it is permissible to ban, not on what "must" be banned. Further permissible prohibitions should enjoy democratic support at levels.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  18. On Sporting Integrity.Alfred Archer - 2016 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 10 (2):117-131.
    It has become increasingly popular for sports fans, pundits, coaches and players to appeal to ideas of ‘sporting integrity’ when voicing their approval or disapproval of some aspect of the sporting world. My goal in this paper will be to examine whether there is any way to understand this idea in a way that both makes sense of the way in which it is used and presents a distinctly ‘sporting’ form of integrity. I will look at three recent high-profile (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. Sporting Supererogation and Why It Matters.Alfred Archer - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):359-373.
    A commonly accepted feature of commonsense morality is that there are some acts that are supererogatory or beyond the call of duty. Recently, philosophers have begun to ask whether something like supererogation might exist in other normative domains such as epistemology and esthetics. In this paper, I will argue that there is good reason to think that sporting supererogation exists. I will then argue that recognizing the existence of sporting supererogation is important because it highlights the value of sport as (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  20.  8
    Sport, Play, and Ethical Reflection.Randolph Feezell - 2006 - University of Illinois Press.
    In paperback for the first time, Randolph Feezell's Sport, Play, and Ethical Reflection immediately tackles two big questions about sport: "What is it?" and "Why does it attract so many people?
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  21.  42
    Toward Sport Reform: Hegemonic Masculinity and Reconceptualizing Competition.Colleen English - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):183-198.
    Hegemonic masculinity, a framework where stereotypically masculine traits are over-emphasized, plays a central role in sport, partly due to an excessive focus on winning. This type of masculinity marginalizes those that do not possess specific traits, including many women and men. I argue sport reform focused on mitigating hypercompetitive attitudes can reduce this harmful and marginalizing hegemonic masculinity in sport. I make this argument first by challenging the dichotomous nature of sport, especially in recognizing that all outcomes are a blend (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  22.  1
    Sport in a Philosophic Context.Carolyn E. Thomas - 1983 - Lea & Febiger.
  23. A Sporting Dilemma and its Jurisprudence.Patrick Lenta & Simon Beck - 2006 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 33 (2):125-143.
    Our purpose in this article is to draw attention to a connection that obtains between two dilemmas from two separate spheres: sports and the law. It is our contention that umpires in the game of cricket may face a dilemma that is similar to a dilemma confronted by legal decision makers and that comparing the nature of the dilemmas, and the arguments advanced to solve them, will serve to advance our understanding of both the law and games.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24. Does Sport Have Intrinsic Value?Leon Culbertson - 2008 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (3):302 – 320.
    This paper considers the suggestion, central to McFee's (2004) moral laboratory argument, that sport is intrinsically valuable. McFee's position is outlined and critiqued and various interpretations of intrinsic value found in the philosophical literature are considered. In addition, Morgan's (2007) claim that sport is an appropriate final end is considered and partially accepted. The paper draws a number of terminological distinctions and concludes that sport does not have intrinsic value as traditionally conceived, but that this is of little consequence with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  25.  17
    Sports Medicine and Ethics.Daniela Testoni, Christoph P. Hornik, P. Brian Smith, Daniel K. Benjamin & Ross E. McKinney - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):4 - 12.
    Physicians working in the world of competitive sports face unique ethical challenges, many of which center around conflicts of interest. Team-employed physicians have obligations to act in the club's best interest while caring for the individual athlete. As such, they must balance issues like protecting versus sharing health information, as well as issues regarding autonomous informed consent versus paternalistic decision making in determining whether an athlete may compete safely. Moreover, the physician has to deal with an athlete's decisions about (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  26.  16
    Sports and ‘Minorities’: Negotiating the Olympic Model.Sylvain Ferez, Sébastien Ruffié & Stéphane Héas - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):177-193.
    This paper studies ‘minority’ initiatives to organize sports games. A meta-analysis of published data in the literature identifies the formal appearance taken by each of these initiatives under the Olympic model. But it also conduces to build a number of indicators to answer a series of questions about their logic and strategies. All the initiatives studied are based on an ambivalent posture that, while based on the denunciation of a discriminating space, claim access to it. By an astonishing paradox, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27.  33
    Sport: An Historical Phenomenology: Anthony Skillen.Anthony Skillen - 1993 - Philosophy 68 (265):343-368.
    Sport often seems to teeter on the edge, on one side of the entertainment industry, on the other of cheating violent aggression: from a make-believe simulacrum of serious play to a nasty chemically enhanced descent into a Hobbesian state of nature. Such perversions lend credibility to reductive views of sport itself as a metonymic feature of capitalism. But that sport as entertainment means fixing it to produce exciting outcomes and amplifying capacities to superhuman proportions, while sport as aggression means treating (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  28.  7
    Watching Sport: Aesthetics, Ethics and Emotion for the Spectator.Stephen Mumford - 2011 - Routledge.
    Do we watch sport for pure dumb entertainment? While some people might do so, Stephen Mumford argues that it can be watched in other ways. Sport can be both a subject of high aesthetic values and a valid source for our moral education. The philosophy of sport has tended to focus on participation, but this book instead examines the philosophical issues around watching sport. Far from being a passive experience, we can all shape the way that we see sport. Delving (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29.  15
    The Sporting Exploration of the World; Toward a Fundamental Ontology of the Sporting Human Being.Gunnar Breivik - 2019 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 14 (2):146-162.
    My perspective in this paper is to look at sport and other physical activities as a way of exploring and experimenting with the environing world. The human being is basically the homo movens – born...
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30.  69
    Performance-Enhancing Drugs, Sport, and the Ideal of Natural Athletic Performance.Sigmund Loland - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (6):8-15.
    The use of certain performance-enhancing drugs is banned in sport. I discuss critically standard justifications of the ban based on arguments from two widely used criteria: fairness and harms to health. I argue that these arguments on their own are inadequate, and only make sense within a normative understanding of athletic performance and the value of sport. In the discourse over PED, the distinction between “natural” and “artificial” performance has exerted significant impact. I examine whether the distinction makes sense from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  31.  15
    Nature Sports.Kevin J. Krein - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (2):193-208.
    Sports such as surfing, mountaineering, and backcountry skiing are often grouped together. But what exactly it is that they share, and the implications of their common characteristics, have not been explained clearly. I refer to such sports as ‘nature sports’ and argue that they share a fundamental structure in which human beings and features of the natural world are brought together. The principal claim I make is that nature sports are those sports in which a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  32.  28
    Nature Sports.Kevin J. Krein - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (2):193-208.
    Sports such as surfing, mountaineering, and backcountry skiing are often grouped together. But what exactly it is that they share, and the implications of their common characteristics, have not been explained clearly. I refer to such sports as ‘nature sports’ and argue that they share a fundamental structure in which human beings and features of the natural world are brought together. The principal claim I make is that nature sports are those sports in which a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  33.  17
    Why Sports Medicine is Not Medicine.Steven D. Edwards & Mike McNamee - 2006 - Health Care Analysis 14 (2):103-109.
    Sports Medicine as an apparent sub-class of medicine has developed apace over the past 30 years. Its recent trajectory has been evidenced by the emergence of specialist international research journals, standard texts, annual conferences, academic appointments and postgraduate courses. Although this field of enquiry and practice lays claim to the title ‘sports medicine’ this paper queries the legitimacy of that claim. Depending upon how ‘sports medicine’ and ‘medicine’ are defined, a plausible-sounding case can be made to show (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  34. Sport.Colin McGinn - 2008 - Routledge.
    Whether it's conkers in the schoolyard, kicking a football in the park, or playing tennis on Wimbledon Centre Court, sport impacts all of our lives. But what is sport and why do we do it? Colin McGinn, renowned philosopher , reflects on our love of sport and explores the value it has for us and the part it plays in a life lived well. Written in the form of a memoir, McGinn discusses many of the sports he has engaged (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  35.  7
    Sport Practitioners as Sport Ecology Designers: How Ecological Dynamics Has Progressively Changed Perceptions of Skill “Acquisition” in the Sporting Habitat.Carl T. Woods, Ian McKeown, Martyn Rothwell, Duarte Araújo, Sam Robertson & Keith Davids - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
  36.  20
    Sports Integrity’ Needs Sports Ethics.Lea Cleret, Mike McNamee & Stuart Page - 2015 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 9 (1):1-5.
  37. Fair Play: The Ethics of Sport.Robert L. Simon - 2010 - Westview Press.
    Addressing both collegiate and professional sports, the updated edition of Fair Play explores the ethical presuppositions of competitive athletics and their ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   99 citations  
  38.  29
    Sport, Art, and Particularity; The Best Equivocation.Terence J. Roberts - 1986 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 13 (1):49-63.
    (1986). Sport, Art, and Particularity; The Best Equivocation. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport: Vol. 13, No. 1, pp. 49-63. doi: 10.1080/00948705.1986.9714441.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  39.  81
    Sport is Not Art.David Best - 1985 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 12 (1):25-40.
  40.  28
    Sports Rules, Their Spirit and the Oldest Knockout Competition of Them All.Mike McNamee - 2009 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 3 (1):1-2.
    (2009). Sports Rules, Their Spirit and the Oldest Knockout Competition of Them All. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 1-2. doi: 10.1080/17511320902752300.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  41. Remote Sport: Risk and Self-Knowledge in Wilder Spaces.Leslie A. Howe - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 35 (1):1-16.
    Previous discussions on the value of sport in remote locations have concentrated on 1) environmental and process concerns, with the rejection of competition and goal-directed or use oriented activity, or 2) the value of risk and dangerous sport for self-affirmation. It is argued that the value of risk in remote sport is in self-knowledge rather than self-affirmation and that risk in remote sport, while enhancing certain kinds of experience, is not necessary. The value of remote sport is in offering the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  42.  18
    Sport as a (Mere) Hobby: In Defense of ‘the Gentle Pursuit of a Modest Competence’.R. Scott Kretchmar - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (3):367-382.
    ABSTRACTIn this essay, I defend sport as a hobby in contrast to sport as a ‘mutual quest for excellence through challenge’. With the assistance of ideas found in the novel Don Quixote, I rai...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43.  56
    Sport, Ethics and Philosophy; Context, History, Prospects.Mike McNamee - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (1):1 – 6.
    (2007). Sport, ethics and philosophy; context, history, prospects. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 1-6. doi: 10.1080/17511320601173329.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  44.  36
    Sport: A Philosophic Inquiry.Joseph S. Ullian - 1973 - Journal of Philosophy 70 (10):299-301.
  45.  41
    Sport-Related Neurotrauma and Neuroprotection: Are Return-to-Play Protocols Justified by Paternalism?L. Syd M. Johnson - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (1):15-26.
    Sport-related neurotrauma annually affects millions of athletes worldwide. The return-to-play protocol is the dominant strategy adopted by sports leagues and organizations to manage one type of sport-related neurotrauma: concussions. RTPs establish guidelines for when athletes with concussions are to be removed from competition or practice, and when they can return. RTPs are intended to be neuroprotective, and to protect athletes from some of the harms of sport-related concussions, but there is athlete resistance to and noncompliance with RTPs. This prompts (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  8
    Adolescent Sports Behavior and Social Networks: The Role of Social Efficacy and Self-Presentation in Sports Behavior.Lei Lei, Huifang Zhang & Xin Wang - 2020 - Complexity 2020:1-10.
    Social networks are a complex system that members communicate, create new connections or destroy existing connections, and further deliver major impacts on each member’s life. Given the spread of the Internet and increased academic pressure, sedentary and prescreen behaviors are very common among adolescents; meanwhile, sports behaviors are gradually decreasing. This situation has had an adverse effect on health. This paper used a questionnaire survey to investigate the influence of social networks on adolescent sports behavior, including the intermediary (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  51
    Sport, Nature and Worldmaking.Kevin Krein - 2008 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (3):285 – 301.
    Many philosophers of sport maintain that athletics can contribute to our understanding of ourselves and the environments in which we live. It may be relatively easy to offer accounts of how athletes might acquire self-knowledge through sport; however, it is far more difficult to see how sport could add to the general understanding of human individuals, cultural frameworks or the material world. The study of sport as a way of worldmaking is helpful in understanding how sport can contribute to the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  48.  12
    Sport, Stories, and Morality: A Rortyan Approach to Doping Ethics.Morten Renslo Sandvik - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (3):383-400.
    ABSTRACTStories pervade sport. In elite spectator sport, stories play out in packed stadiums while being broadcast simultaneously to immense TV audiences. These stories, which present controversial...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  2
    Sports and Athletics: Philosophy in Action.Joseph C. Mihalich - 1982 - Rowman & Littlefield.
    Although sports and athletics provide a nearly universal social context for the learning of such cherished values as courage, honesty, discipline, communal efforts, and the pursuit of excellence, little attention has been devoted to the philosophy of this important element in human life. In a fascinating survey of the philosophic dimensions of sports and athletics, the author delves into a variety of topics, including game and play theory, play-forms and game principles in history, existentialism and sports, the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50.  8
    Sport as a (Mere) Hobby: In Defense of ‘the Gentle Pursuit of a Modest Competence’.R. Scott Kretchmar - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (3):367-382.
    ABSTRACTIn this essay, I defend sport as a hobby in contrast to sport as a ‘mutual quest for excellence through challenge’. With the assistance of ideas found in the novel Don Quixote, I rai...
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000