Results for 'St��phane Bouchard'

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  1.  3
    Towards Unravelling theIgf2/H19 Imprinted Domain.St�Phane Viville & M. Azim Surani - 1995 - Bioessays 17 (10):835-838.
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  2.  21
    Homeosis and Atavistic Regeneration: The 'Biogenetic Law' in Entwicklungsmechanik.Sté Schmitt & Phane - 2003 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (2):193-210.
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  3.  29
    A Liberal Defence of the Intrinsic Value of Cultures.St|[Eacute]|Phane Courtois - 2008 - Contemporary Political Theory 7 (1):31.
  4.  10
    The Cartulary of St.-Marcel-Lès-Chalon, 779-1126.Constance Brittain Bouchard.George Beech - 2000 - Speculum 75 (2):445-446.
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  5.  6
    Community and Abbot in the Rule of St. Benedict. Adalbert de Vogüé, Charles Philippi, Ethel Rae Perkins.Constance Bouchard - 1989 - Speculum 64 (2):510-511.
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  6.  4
    From Groups to Individuals: Evolution and Emerging Individuality.Frédéric Bouchard & Philippe Huneman (eds.) - 2013 - MIT Press.
    Our intuitive assumption that only organisms are the real individuals in the natural world is at odds with developments in cell biology, ecology, genetics, evolutionary biology, and other fields. Although organisms have served for centuries as nature’s paradigmatic individuals, science suggests that organisms are only one of the many ways in which the natural world could be organized. When living beings work together—as in ant colonies, beehives, and bacteria-metazoan symbiosis—new collective individuals can emerge. In this book, leading scholars consider the (...)
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  7. “Muslimness” and Multiplicity in Qualitative Research and in Government Reports in Canada.Jennifer A. Selby - 2016 - Critical Research on Religion 4 (1):72-89.
    With reference to a qualitative study on everyday religiosity among Muslims in St. John's, Canada, this paper examines trends in academic sources and public policy on Islam that over-privilege the most committed practitioners, thereby narrowly depicting “Muslimness.” I situate this overemphasis by reflecting on what Mamdani calls “culture talk,” an essentializing discourse heightened in the post-9/11 west. Interview data, along with a trend in social scientific research on Muslims that emphasize the most pious and the outcomes following the Ontario “Boyd (...)
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  8. Can the Aim of Belief Ground Epistemic Normativity?Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (12):3181-3198.
    For many epistemologists and normativity theorists, epistemic norms necessarily entail normative reasons. Why or in virtue of what do epistemic norms have this necessary normative authority? According to what I call epistemic constitutivism, it is ultimately because belief constitutively aims at truth. In this paper, I examine various versions of the aim of belief thesis and argue that none of them can plausibly ground the normative authority of epistemic norms. I conclude that epistemic constitutivism is not a promising strategy for (...)
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  9.  24
    Does St. Thomas Really Prove the Soul’s Immortality?George St Hilaire - 1960 - New Scholasticism 34 (3):340-356.
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  10. Epistemic Instrumentalism and the Too Few Reasons Objection.Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2015 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 23 (3):337-355.
    According to epistemic instrumentalism, epistemic normativity arises from and depends on facts about our ends. On that view, a consideration C is an epistemic reason for a subject S to Φ only if Φ-ing would promote an end that S has. However, according to the Too Few Epistemic Reasons objection, this cannot be correct since there are cases in which, intuitively, C is an epistemic reason for S to Φ even though Φ-ing would not promote any of S’s ends. After (...)
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  11.  61
    A Persistence Enhancing Propensity Account of Ecological Function to Explain Ecosystem Evolution.Antoine C. Dussault & Frédéric Bouchard - 2017 - Synthese 194 (4).
    We argue that ecology in general and biodiversity and ecosystem function research in particular need an understanding of functions which is both ahistorical and evolutionarily grounded. A natural candidate in this context is Bigelow and Pargetter’s evolutionary forward-looking account which, like the causal role account, assigns functions to parts of integrated systems regardless of their past history, but supplements this with an evolutionary dimension that relates functions to their bearers’ ability to thrive and perpetuate themselves. While Bigelow and Pargetter’s account (...)
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  12. Is Epistemic Normativity Value-Based?Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2017 - Dialogue 56 (3):407-430.
    What is the source of epistemic normativity? In virtue of what do epistemic norms have categorical normative authority? According to epistemic teleologism, epistemic normativity comes from value. Epistemic norms have categorical authority because conforming to them is necessarily good in some relevant sense. In this article, I argue that epistemic teleologism should be rejected. The problem, I argue, is that there is no relevant sense in which it is always good to believe in accordance with epistemic norms, including in cases (...)
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  13.  79
    Knowledge, Reasons, and Errors About Error Theory.Charles Cote-Bouchard & Clayton Littlejohn - 2018 - In Robin McKenna & Christos Kyriacou (eds.), Metaepistemology: Realism & Antirealism. Palgrave Macmillan.
    According to moral error theorists, moral claims necessarily represent categorically or robustly normative facts. But since there are no such facts, moral thought and discourse are systematically mistaken. One widely discussed objection to the moral error theory is that it cannot be true because it leads to an epistemic error theory. We argue that this objection is mistaken. Objectors may be right that the epistemic error theory is untenable. We also agree with epistemic realists that our epistemological claims are not (...)
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  14.  94
    Belief's Own Metaethics? A Case Against Epistemic Normativity.Charles Cote-Bouchard - 2017 - Dissertation, King's College London
    Epistemology is widely seen as a normative discipline like ethics. Just like moral facts, epistemic facts – i.e. facts about our beliefs’ epistemic justification, rationality, reasonableness, correctness, warrant, and the like – are standardly viewed as normative facts. Yet, whereas many philosophers have rejected the existence of moral facts, few have raised similar doubts about the existence of epistemic facts. In recent years however, several metaethicists and epistemologists have rejected this Janus-faced or dual stance towards the existence of moral and (...)
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  15.  7
    Reclaiming Relationality Through the Logic of the Gift and Vulnerability.Laurie Gagnon-Bouchard & Camille Ranger - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (1):41-57.
    This article addresses the conditions that are necessary for non-Indigenous people to learn from Indigenous people, more specifically from women and feminists. As non-Indigenous scholars, we first explore the challenges of epistemic dialogue through the example of Traditional Ecological Knowledge. From there, through the concept of mastery, we examine the social and ontological conditions under which settler subjectivities develop. As demonstrated by Julietta Singh and Val Plumwood, the logic of mastery—which has legitimated the oppression and exploitation of Indigenous peoples—has been (...)
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  16.  40
    Fitness (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy).A. Rosenberg & F. Bouchard - 2011 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Web 17 (8):457-473.
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  17. Matthen and Ariew’s Obituary for Fitness: Reports of its Death Have Been Greatly Exaggerated. [REVIEW]Alexander Rosenberg & Frederic Bouchard - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):343-353.
    Philosophers of biology have been absorbed by the problem of defining evolutionary fitness since Darwin made it central to biological explanation. The apparent problem is obvious. Define fitness as some biologists implicitly do, in terms of actual survival and reproduction, and the principle of natural selection turns into an empty tautology: those organisms which survive and reproduce in larger numbers, survive and reproduce in larger numbers. Accordingly, many writers have sought to provide a definition for ‘fitness’ which avoid this outcome. (...)
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  18.  26
    Epistemological Closed Questions: A Reply to Greco.Charles Côte-Bouchard - 2017 - Manuscrito 40 (4):97-111.
    ABSTRACT According to G.E. Moore’s ‘Open Question’ argument, moral facts cannot be reduced or analyzed in non-normative natural terms. Does the OQA apply equally in the epistemic domain? Does Moore’s argument have the same force against reductionist accounts of epistemic facts and concepts? In a recent article, Daniel Greco has argued that it does. According to Greco, an epistemological version of the OQA is just as promising as its moral cousin, because the relevant questions in epistemology are just as ‘open’ (...)
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  19. Causal Processes, Fitness, and the Differential Persistence of Lineages.Frédéric Bouchard - 2008 - Philosophy of Science 75 (5):560-570.
    Ecological fitness has been suggested to provide a unifying definition of fitness. However, a metric for this notion of fitness was in most cases unavailable except by proxy with differential reproductive success. In this article, I show how differential persistence of lineages can be used as a way to assess ecological fitness. This view is inspired by a better understanding of the evolution of some clonal plants, colonial organisms, and ecosystems. Differential persistence shows the limitation of an ensemblist noncausal understanding (...)
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  20. From Groups to Individuals. New Issues in Biological Individuality.Philippe Huneman & Frédéric Bouchard - unknown
    Our intuitive assumption that only organisms are the real individuals in the natural world is at odds with developments in cell biology, ecology, genetics, evolutionary biology, and other fields. Although organisms have served for centuries as nature's paradigmatic individuals, science suggests that organisms are only one of the many ways in which the natural world could be organized. When living beings work together--as in ant colonies, beehives, and bacteria-metazoan symbiosis--new collective individuals can emerge. In this book, leading scholars consider the (...)
     
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  21.  5
    The Symbolic Spirituality of St. Francis.Donald P. St John - 1979 - Franciscan Studies 39 (1):192-205.
  22. Fitness, Probability and the Principles of Natural Selection.Frederic Bouchard & Alexander Rosenberg - 2004 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (4):693-712.
    We argue that a fashionable interpretation of the theory of natural selection as a claim exclusively about populations is mistaken. The interpretation rests on adopting an analysis of fitness as a probabilistic propensity which cannot be substantiated, draws parallels with thermodynamics which are without foundations, and fails to do justice to the fundamental distinction between drift and selection. This distinction requires a notion of fitness as a pairwise comparison between individuals taken two at a time, and so vitiates the interpretation (...)
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  23.  16
    ST, LP and Tolerant Metainferences.Bogdan Dicher & Francesco Paoli - 2019 - In Can Başkent & Thomas Macaulay Ferguson (eds.), Graham Priest on Dialetheism and Paraconsistency. Springer Verlag. pp. 383-407.
    The strict-tolerant approach to paradox promises to erect theories of naïve truth and tolerant vagueness on the firm bedrock of classical logic. We assess the extent to which this claim is founded. Building on some results by Girard we show that the usual proof-theoretic formulation of propositional ST in terms of the classical sequent calculus without primitive Cut is incomplete with respect to ST-valid metainferences, and exhibit a complete calculus for the same class of metainferences. We also argue that the (...)
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  24. John of St. Thomas [Poinsot] on Sacred Science: Cursus Theologicus I, Question 1, Disputation 2.John Of St Thomas - 2014 - St. Augustine's Press.
  25.  10
    Harry Frankfurt peut-il sauver le blâme doxastique? Possibilités alternatives épistémiques et involontarisme doxastique.Charles Côté-Bouchard - 2012 - Ithaque 10:137-157.
    Peut-on être blâmé pour ses croyances? Bien qu’il s’agisse d’une pratique courante et en apparence légitime, le blâme doxastique entre en conflit avec deux thèses intuitivement plausibles. D’un côté, il semble que nous puissions seulement être blâmés pour ce qui est sous notre contrôle volontaire. Mais de l’autre, il est largement admis que la croyance est un état fondamentalement passif et involontaire. Il s’ensuit que nous ne pouvons jamais être blâmés pour nos croyances. Le présent article examine la réponse que (...)
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  26. Darwinism Without Populations: A More Inclusive Understanding of the “Survival of the Fittest”.Frédéric Bouchard - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (1):106-114.
    Following Wallace’s suggestion, Darwin framed his theory using Spencer’s expression “survival of the fittest”. Since then, fitness occupies a significant place in the conventional understanding of Darwinism, even though the explicit meaning of the term ‘fitness’ is rarely stated. In this paper I examine some of the different roles that fitness has played in the development of the theory. Whereas the meaning of fitness was originally understood in ecological terms, it took a statistical turn in terms of reproductive success throughout (...)
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  27.  43
    What Is a Symbiotic Superindividual and How Do You Measure Its Fitness?Frédéric Bouchard - 2013 - In Philippe Huneman & Frédéric Bouchard (eds.), From Groups to Individuals. Evolution and Emerging Individuality. MIT Press. pp. 243.
  28.  37
    Saying of St. Francis de Sales Concerning the Need for Christian Cheerfulness in Everyday Life.St Francis de Sales - 1997 - The Chesterton Review 23 (3):391-391.
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  29.  1
    Historical and Culturologic Aspects in Slavic Studies as the Directions of a Joint Activity of St. Cyril and St. Methodius University of Veliko Turnovo and Bashkir State University.St Burov & L. A. Kalimullina - 2013 - Liberal Arts in Russiaроссийский Гуманитарный Журналrossijskij Gumanitarnyj Žurnalrossijskij Gumanitaryj Zhurnalrossiiskii Gumanitarnyi Zhurnal 2 (3):293.
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  30.  4
    Social Myths and Collective Imaginaries. Some Afterthoughts.Gérard Bouchard - forthcoming - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
  31.  85
    Ecosystem Evolution is About Variation and Persistence, Not Populations and Reproduction.Frédéric Bouchard - 2014 - Biological Theory 9 (4):382-391.
    Building upon a non-standard understanding of evolutionary process focusing on variation and persistence, I will argue that communities and ecosystems can evolve by natural selection as emergent individuals. Evolutionary biology has relied ever increasingly on the modeling of population dynamics. Most have taken for granted that we all agree on what is a population. Recent work has reexamined this perceived consensus. I will argue that there are good reasons to restrict the term “population” to collections of monophyletically related replicators and (...)
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  32.  89
    Symbiosis, Lateral Function Transfer and the (Many) Saplings of Life.Frédéric Bouchard - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (4):623-641.
    One of intuitions driving the acceptance of a neat structured tree of life is the assumption that organisms and the lineages they form have somewhat stable spatial and temporal boundaries. The phenomenon of symbiosis shows us that such ‘fixist’ assumptions does not correspond to how the natural world actually works. The implications of lateral gene transfer (LGT) have been discussed elsewhere; I wish to stress a related point. I will focus on lateral function transfer (LFT) and will argue, using examples (...)
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  33.  25
    Darwinism Without Populations: A More Inclusive Understanding of the “Survival of the Fittest”.Frédéric Bouchard - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (1):106-114.
  34. Guy Bouchard, Laurent Giroux, Gilbert Leclerc, L'utopie Aujourd'hui Reviewed By.Andre Rocque - 1986 - Philosophy in Review 6 (5):196-198.
    Cet ouvrage rassemble cinq textes. L'introduction (Guy Bouchard) dénonce l'opprobre injustifiée qui entoure souvent l'utopie et plaide en faveur de son actualité. Le chapitre 1 (Laurent Giroux) thématise les rapports entre utopie et philosophie en suivant deux pistes, celle d'une philosophie de l'utopie et celle de l'utopie philosophique. Le chapitre 2 (Gilbert Leclerc) aborde l'éducation permanente dans la perspective de la portée existentielle de l'utopie et de son impact sociétal. Le chapitre 3 (G. B.) définit l'utopie comme une société (...)
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  35.  39
    How Ecosystem Evolution Strengthens the Case for Functional Pluralism.Frédéric Bouchard - 2013 - In Philippe Huneman (ed.), Functions: Selection and Mechanisms. Springer. pp. 83--95.
  36.  47
    Beyond STS: A Research‐Based Framework for Socioscientific Issues Education.Dana L. Zeidler, Troy D. Sadler, Michael L. Simmons & Elaine V. Howes - 2005 - Science Education 89 (3):357-377.
  37.  76
    Understanding Colonial Traits Using Symbiosis Research and Ecosystem Ecology.Frédéric Bouchard - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (3):240-246.
    E. O. Wilson (1974: 54) describes the problem that social organisms pose: “On what bases do we distinguish the extremely modified members of an invertebrate colony from the organs of a metazoan animal?” This framing of the issue has inspired many to look more closely at how groups of organisms form and behave as emergent individuals. The possible existence of “superorganisms” test our best intuitions about what can count and act as genuine biological individuals and how we should study them. (...)
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  38. St. Thomas Aquinas on Death and the Separated Soul.Patrick Toner - 2010 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):587-599.
    Since St. Thomas Aquinas holds that death is a substantial change, a popular current interpretation of his anthropology must be mistaken. According to that interpretation – the ‘survivalist’ view – St. Thomas holds that we human beings survive our deaths, constituted solely by our souls in the interim between death and resurrection. This paper argues that St. Thomas must have held the ‘corruptionist’ view: the view that human beings cease to exist at their deaths. Certain objections to the corruptionist view (...)
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  39.  42
    Would St. Thomas Aquinas Baptize an Extraterrestrial?Edmund Michael Lazzari - 2018 - New Blackfriars 99 (1082):440-457.
    This paper will attempt an investigation of hypothetical intelligent extraterrestrial life from the perspective of the philosophy and theology of St. Thomas Aquinas. Section I will feature an overview of St. Thomas's relevant philosophy of human nature and the differences between human and extraterrestrial natures. Section II will, with special attention to St. Thomas's De malo, treat some possibilities regarding the need for salvation in our hypothetical species. Section III will outline relevant aspects of Thomistic soteriology, especially the reasons behind (...)
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  40.  7
    G. KIOURTZIAN, Receuil des Inscriptions Grecques Chrétiennes des Cyclades, De la Fin du IIIe au VIIe Siècle Après J.-C.Phane Drossoyianni - 2003 - Byzantinische Zeitschrift 95 (2):690-696.
    This is a very good book. It gives 205 inscriptions from ten of the Cycladic islands. A number of them are published here for the first time. In their majority they are either funerary or invocations for divine help. Some are dedicatory. Some are inscriptions on well-paintings identifying the scene or the saint depicted or being themselves dedicatory or invocatory. Some are in praise of God or in thanks to God. Some are exhortations to the faithful or quotations from the (...)
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  41.  23
    An Asterisk Denotes a Publication by a Member of the American Catholic Philosophical Association. The Editors Welcome Suggestions for Reviews. Allman, Mark J. Who Would Jesus Kill? War, Peace, and the Christian Tradition. Winona, Minn.: St. Mary's Press, 2008. Pp. 325. Paper $24.95, ISBN: 978-0-88489-984-6. [REVIEW]G. E. M. Anscombe & St Thomas Aquinas - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (4).
  42.  17
    Species Are the Building Blocks of Ecosystem Services and Environmental Sustainability.Ashish Sharma, Frank Bouchard, Sean Ryan, Derrick Parker & Jessica J. Hellmann - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (1):29-32.
  43. Intro Summa Theologiae Thomas Aquinas: John of St. Thomas.John Of St Thomas & John Poinsot - 2004 - St. Augustine's Press.
     
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  44.  2
    Social Myths and Collective Imaginaries. New Directions.Gérard Bouchard - forthcoming - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  45.  11
    Yves Bouchard, Le holisme épistémologique de Kant, Montréal : Bellarmin ; Paris : Vrin, Collection Analytiques , 2004, 182 pages. [REVIEW]Sophie Grapotte - 2006 - Philosophiques 33 (1):302-305.
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  46.  25
    Deleuze and Guattari’s Language for New Empirical Inquiry.Elizabeth Adams St Pierre - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (11):1080-1089.
    This paper reviews Deleuze’s theory of language in Logic of Sense, and Deleuze and Guattari’s theory of language in A Thousand Plateaus. In the ontology informed by the Stoics described in those books, human being and language do not exist separately but in a mixture of words and things. The author argues that this flattened ontology of surfaces is incommensurable with the ontology of depth used in conventional humanist qualitative methodology and recommends beginning new empirical inquiry with a concept instead (...)
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  47. The Record Book of the St. Louis Philosophical Society, Founded February 1866.Mo St Louis Philosophical Society Louis, Kurt F. Leidecker & William Torrey Harris - 1990
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  48.  63
    The St. Petersburg Gamble and Risk.Paul Weirich - 1984 - Theory and Decision 17 (2):193-202.
    One resolution of the St. Petersburg paradox recognizes that a gamble carries a risk sensitive to the gamble's stakes. If aversion to risk increases sufficiently fast as stakes go up, the St. Petersburg gamble has a finite utility.
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  49. St. Augustine on Time, Time Numbers, and Enduring Objects.Jason W. Carter - 2011 - Vivarium 49 (4):301-323.
    Throughout his works, St. Augustine offers at least nine distinct views on the nature of time, at least three of which have remained almost unnoticed in the secondary literature. I first examine each these nine descriptions of time and attempt to diffuse common misinterpretations, especially of the views which seek to identify Augustinian time as consisting of an un-extended point or a distentio animi . Second, I argue that Augustine's primary understanding of time, like that of later medieval scholastics, is (...)
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  50.  22
    Happy, Sad, Scary and Peaceful Musical Excerpts for Research on Emotions.Sandrine Vieillard, Isabelle Peretz, Nathalie Gosselin, Stéphanie Khalfa, Lise Gagnon & Bernard Bouchard - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (4):720-752.
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