8 found
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  1.  6
    Unregulated Health Research Using Mobile Devices: Ethical Considerations and Policy Recommendations.Mark A. Rothstein, John T. Wilbanks, Laura M. Beskow, Kathleen M. Brelsford, Kyle B. Brothers, Megan Doerr, Barbara J. Evans, Catherine M. Hammack-Aviran, Michelle L. McGowan & Stacey A. Tovino - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S1):196-226.
    Mobile devices with health apps, direct-to-consumer genetic testing, crowd-sourced information, and other data sources have enabled research by new classes of researchers. Independent researchers, citizen scientists, patient-directed researchers, self-experimenters, and others are not covered by federal research regulations because they are not recipients of federal financial assistance or conducting research in anticipation of a submission to the FDA for approval of a new drug or medical device. This article addresses the difficult policy challenge of promoting the welfare and interests of (...)
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  2.  7
    California Takes the Lead on Data Privacy Law.Mark A. Rothstein & Stacey A. Tovino - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (5):4-5.
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  3.  35
    Functional Neuroimaging and the Law: Trends and Directions for Future Scholarship.Stacey A. Tovino - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):44 – 56.
    Under the umbrella of the burgeoning neurotransdisciplines, scholars are using the principles and research methodologies of their primary and secondary fields to examine developments in neuroimaging, neuromodulation and psychopharmacology. The path for advanced scholarship at the intersection of law and neuroscience may clear if work across the disciplines is collected and reviewed and outstanding and debated issues are identified and clarified. In this article, I organize, examine and refine a narrow class of the burgeoning neurotransdiscipline scholarship; that is, scholarship at (...)
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  4.  5
    Privacy and Security Issues with Mobile Health Research Applications.Stacey A. Tovino - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S1):154-158.
    This article examines the privacy and security issues associated with mobile application-mediated health research, concentrating in particular on research conducted or participated in by independent scientists, citizen scientists, and patient researchers. Building on other articles in this issue that examine state research laws and state data protection laws as possible sources of privacy and security protections for mobile research participants, this article focuses on the lack of application of federal standards to mobile application-mediated health research. As discussed in more detail (...)
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  5.  2
    Privacy Risks of Interoperable Electronic Health Records: Segmentation of Sensitive Information Will Help.Mark A. Rothstein & Stacey A. Tovino - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (4):771-777.
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  6.  59
    The Impact of Neuroscience on Health Law.Stacey A. Tovino - 2008 - Neuroethics 1 (2):101-117.
    Advances in neuroscience have implications for criminal law as well as civil and regulatory law, including health, disability, and benefit law. The role of the behavioral and brain sciences in health insurance claims, the mental health parity debate, and disability proceedings is examined.
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  7.  18
    The Confidentiality and Privacy Implications of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.Stacey A. Tovino - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (4):844-850.
    Advances in science and technology frequently raise new ethical, legal, and social issues, and developments in neuroscience and neuroimaging technology are no exception. Within the field of neuroethics, leading scientists, ethicists, and humanists are exploring the implications of efforts to image, study, treat, and enhance the human brain.This article focuses on one aspect of neuroethics: the confidentiality and privacy implications of advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging. Following a brief orientation to fMRI and an overview of some of its current (...)
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  8.  18
    The Confidentiality and Privacy Implications of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.Stacey A. Tovino - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (4):844-850.
    Advances in science and technology frequently raise new ethical, legal, and social issues, and developments in neuroscience and neuroimaging technology are no exception. Within the field of neuroethics, leading scientists, ethicists, and humanists are exploring the implications of efforts to image, study, treat, and enhance the human brain.This article focuses on one aspect of neuroethics: the confidentiality and privacy implications of advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging. Following a brief orientation to fMRI and an overview of some of its current (...)
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