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  1.  24
    Public Opinion on Cognitive Enhancement Varies across Different Situations.Claire T. Dinh, Stacey Humphries & Anjan Chatterjee - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (4):224-237.
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  2.  23
    Attitudes Toward Cognitive Enhancement: The Role of Metaphor and Context.Erin C. Conrad, Stacey Humphries & Anjan Chatterjee - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):35-47.
  3. Morality is in the eye of the beholder: the neurocognitive basis of the “anomalous-is-bad” stereotype.Clifford Workman, Stacey Humphries, Franziska Hartung, Geoffrey K. Aguirre, Joseph W. Kable & Anjan Chatterjee - 2021 - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 999 (999):1-15.
    Are people with flawed faces regarded as having flawed moral characters? An “anomalous-is-bad” stereotype is hypothesized to facilitate negative biases against people with facial anomalies (e.g., scars), but whether and how these biases affect behavior and brain functioning remain open questions. We examined responses to anomalous faces in the brain (using a visual oddball paradigm), behavior (in economic games), and attitudes. At the level of the brain, the amygdala demonstrated a specific neural response to anomalous faces—sensitive to disgust and a (...)
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  4. Visual Attention, Bias, and Social Dispositions Toward People with Facial Anomalies: A Prospective Study with Eye-Tracking Technology.Dillan Villavisanis, Clifford Ian Workman, Zachary Zapatero, Giap Vu, Stacey Humphries, Daniel Cho, Jordan Swanson, Scott Bartlett, Anjan Chatterjee & Jesse Taylor - 2023 - Annals of Plastic Surgery 90 (5):482-486.
    Background: Facial attractiveness influences our perceptions of others, with beautiful faces reaping societal rewards and anomalous faces encountering penalties. The purpose of this study was to determine associations of visual attention with bias and social dispositions toward people with facial anomalies. -/- Methods: Sixty subjects completed tests evaluating implicit bias, explicit bias, and social dispositions before viewing publicly available images of preoperative and postoperative patients with hemifacial microsomia. Eye-tracking was used to register visual fixations. -/- Results: Participants with higher implicit (...)
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  5.  96
    Facial Scars: Do Position and Orientation Matter?Zachary Zapatero, Clifford Ian Workman, Christopher Kalmar, Stacey Humphries, Mychajlo Kosyk, Anna Carlson, Jordan Swanson, Anjan Chatterjee & Jesse Taylor - 2022 - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 150 (6):1237-1246.
    Background: This study tested the core tenets of how facial scars are perceived by characterizing layperson response to faces with scars. The authors predicted that scars closer to highly viewed structures of the face (i.e., upper lip and lower lid), scars aligned against resting facial tension lines, and scars in the middle of anatomical subunits of the face would be rated less favorably. Methods: -/- Volunteers aged 18 years and older from the United States were recruited through Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (...)
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