Results for 'Stan Schoeman'

537 found
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  1.  6
    Book Review Section 2. [REVIEW]John T. Zepper, Edgar B. Gumbert, Daniel P. Huden, William P. Mclemore, William T. Lowe, Donald Warren, Roy R. Nasstrom, Stan Schoeman & Robert Nicholas Berard - 1983 - Educational Studies 14 (1):64-92.
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  2.  9
    Schoeman, From Page 25.Stephen Schoeman - 1994 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 13 (3-4):36-36.
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  3. Privacy and Social Freedom.Ferdinand David Schoeman - 1992 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book attacks the assumption found in moral philosophy that social control as such is an intellectually and morally destructive force. It replaces this view with a richer and deeper perspective on the nature of social character aimed at showing how social freedom cannot mean immunity from social pressure. The author demonstrates how our competence as rational and social agents depends on a constructive adaptation of social control mechanisms. Our facility at achieving our goals is enhanced, rather than undermined, by (...)
     
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  4. Selfhood and Otherness in Kierkegaard's Authorship: A Heterological Investigation.Leo Stan - 2017 - Lexington Books.
    This book explores the multiple meaning of the notion of otherness in Søren Kierkegaard’s thought. Leo Stan discusses in detail the threefold structure of human existence in Kierkegaard’s authorship as a whole, both pseudonymous and self-signed.
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  5.  31
    Phoronomy: Space, Construction, and Mathematizing Motion.Marius Stan - forthcoming - In Michael Bennett McNulty (ed.), Kant's Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science: A Critical Guide. New York, NY, USA:
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  6. Standing Colossus: Newton and the French: Essay Review of J. B. Shank, Before Voltaire: The French Origins of “Newtonian” Mechanics, 1680–1715. University of Chicago Press, 2018. Cloth, X+444 Pp., Ill. ISBN 978-0-226-50929-7. $55.00. [REVIEW]Marius Stan - 2019 - Annals of Science 76 (3-4):347-354.
    A critical discussion of J.B. Shank, 'Before Voltaire: the French Origins of "Newtonian" Mechanics,' University of Chicago Press, 2018.
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  7. Huygens on Inertial Structure and Relativity.Marius Stan - 2016 - Philosophy of Science 83 (2):277-298.
    I explain and assess here Huygens’ concept of relative motion. I show that it allows him to ground most of the Law of Inertia, and also to explain rotation. Thereby his concept obviates the need for Newton’s absolute space. Thus his account is a powerful foundation for mechanics, though not without some tension.
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  8. Absolute Time: The Limit of Kant's Idealism.Marius Stan - 2019 - Noûs 53 (2):433-461.
    I examine here if Kant can explain our knowledge of duration by showing that time has metric structure. To do so, I spell out two possible solutions: time’s metric could be intrinsic or extrinsic. I argue that Kant’s resources are too weak to secure an intrinsic, transcendentally-based temporal metrics; but he can supply an extrinsic metric, based in a metaphysical fact about matter. I conclude that Transcendental Idealism is incomplete: it cannot account for the durative aspects of experience—or it can (...)
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  9. Euler, Newton, and Foundations for Mechanics.Marius Stan - 2017 - In Chris Smeenk & Eric Schliesser (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Newton. Oxford University Press. pp. 1-22.
    This chapter looks at Euler’s relation to Newton, and at his role in the rise of ‘Newtonian’ mechanics. It aims to give a sense of Newton’s complicated legacy for Enlightenment science, and to raise awareness that some key ‘Newtonian’ results really come from Euler.
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  10. Emilie du Chatelet's Metaphysics of Substance.Marius Stan - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):477-496.
    much early modern metaphysics grew with an eye to the new science of its time, but few figures took it as seriously as Emilie du Châtelet. Happily, her oeuvre is now attracting close, renewed attention, and so the time is ripe for looking into her metaphysical foundation for empirical theory. Accordingly, I move here to do just that. I establish two conclusions. First, du Châtelet's basic metaphysics is a robust realism. Idealist strands, while they exist, are confined to non-basic regimes. (...)
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  11. Newton's Concepts of Force Among the Leibnizians.Marius Stan - 2017 - In Mordechai Feingold & Elizabethanne Boran (eds.), Reading Newton in Early Modern Europe. Leiden: Brill. pp. 244-289.
    I argue that the key dynamical concepts and laws of Newton's Principia never gained a solid foothold in Germany before Kant in the 1750s. I explain this absence as due to Leibniz. Thus I make a case for a robust Leibnizian legacy for Enlightenment science, and I solve what Jonathan Israel called “a meaningful historical problem on its own,” viz. the slow and hesitant reception of Newton in pre-Kantian Germany.
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  12.  64
    From Metaphysical Principles to Dynamical Laws.Marius Stan - forthcoming - In David Marshall Miller & Dana Jalobeanu (eds.), The Cambridge History of Philosophy of the Scientific Revolution. New York, NY, USA:
    My thesis in this paper is: the modern concept of laws of motion—qua dynamical laws—emerges in 18th-century mechanics. The driving factor for it was the need to extend mechanics beyond the centroid theories of the late-1600s. The enabling result behind it was the rise of differential equations. -/- In consequence, by the mid-1700s we see a deep shift in the form and status of laws of motion. The shift is among the critical inflection points where early modern mechanics turns into (...)
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  13.  59
    Absolute and Relative Motion.Marius Stan - forthcoming - In Charles T. Wolfe & Dana Jalobeanu (eds.), Encyclopedia of Early Modern Philosophy and the Sciences.
    Modern philosophy of physics debates whether motion is absolute or relative. The debate began in the 1600s, so it deserves a close look here. Primarily, it was a controversy in metaphysics, but it had epistemic aspects too. I begin with the former, and then touch upon the latter at the end.
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  14. Kant’s Third Law of Mechanics: The Long Shadow of Leibniz.Marius Stan - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (3):493-504.
    This paper examines the origin, range and meaning of the Principle of Action and Reaction in Kant’s mechanics. On the received view, it is a version of Newton’s Third Law. I argue that Kant meant his principle as foundation for a Leibnizian mechanics. To find a ‘Newtonian’ law of action and reaction, we must look to Kant’s ‘dynamics,’ or theory of matter. I begin, in part I, by noting marked differences between Newton’s and Kant’s laws of action and reaction. I (...)
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  15. Absolute Space and the Riddle of Rotation: Kant’s Response to Newton.Marius Stan - 2016 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 7:257-308.
    Newton had a fivefold argument that true motion must be motion in absolute space, not relative to matter. Like Newton, Kant holds that bodies have true motions. Unlike him, though, Kant takes all motion to be relative to matter, not to space itself. Thus, he must respond to Newton’s argument above. I reconstruct here Kant’s answer in detail. I prove that Kant addresses just one part of Newton’s case, namely, his “argument from the effects” of rotation. And, to show that (...)
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  16. Once More Unto the Breach: Kant and Newton: Michael Friedman: Kant’s Construction of Nature. A Reading of the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013, Xix+624pp, £70 HB.Marius Stan - 2014 - Metascience 23 (2):233-242.
  17.  7
    Varieties of Moral Personality: Ethics and Psychological Realism.Ferdinand Schoeman - 1993 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (2):467-471.
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  18. Responsibility, Character, and the Emotions: New Essays in Moral Psychology.Ferdinand Schoeman (ed.) - 1987 - Cambridge University Press.
    This volume of original essays addresses a range of issues concerning the responsibility individuals have for their actions and for their characters. Among the central questions considered are the following: What scope is there for regarding a person as responsible for his or her character given genetic and environmental factors? Does an account of responsibility provide a legitimate basis for the retributive emotions? Are we ever justified in feeling guilty for occurences over which we have no control? Does responsibility for (...)
  19.  16
    Heavy Drinking: The Myth of Alcoholism as a Disease.Ferdinand Schoeman - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (3):493-498.
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  20. Kant’s Early Theory of Motion.Marius Stan - 2009 - The Leibniz Review 19:29-61.
    This paper examines the young Kant’s claim that all motion is relative, and argues that it is the core of a metaphysical dynamics of impact inspired by Leibniz and Wolff. I start with some background to Kant’s early dynamics, and show that he rejects Newton’s absolute space as a foundation for it. Then I reconstruct the exact meaning of Kant’s relativity, and the model of impact he wants it to support. I detail (in Section II and III) his polemic engagement (...)
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  21. Unity for Kant’s Natural Philosophy.Marius Stan - 2014 - Philosophy of Science 81 (3):423-443.
    I uncover here a conflict in Kant’s natural philosophy. His matter theory and laws of mechanics are in tension. Kant’s laws are fit for particles but are too narrow to handle continuous bodies, which his doctrine of matter demands. To fix this defect, Kant ultimately must ground the Torque Law; that is, the impressed torque equals the change in angular momentum. But that grounding requires a premise—the symmetry of the stress tensor—that Kant denies himself. I argue that his problem would (...)
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  22.  20
    Is an Off-Task Mind a Freely-Moving Mind? Examining the Relationship Between Different Dimensions of Thought.Caitlin Mills, Quentin Raffaelli, Zachary C. Irving, Dylan Stan & Kalina Christoff - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 58:20-33.
  23. Rights of Children, Rights of Parents, and the Moral Basis of the Family.Ferdinand Schoeman - 1980 - Ethics 91 (1):6-19.
  24. Metaphysical Foundations of Neoclassical Mechanics.Marius Stan - 2017 - In Michela Massimi & Angela Breitenbach (eds.), Kant and the Laws of Nature. Cambridge University Press. pp. 214-234.
    I examine here if Kant’s metaphysics of matter can support any late-modern versions of classical mechanics. I argue that in principle it can, by two different routes. I assess the interpretive costs of each approach, and recommend the most promising strategy: a mass-point approach.
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  25. Philosophical Dimensions of Privacy: An Anthology.Ferdinand David Schoeman (ed.) - 1984 - Cambridge University Press.
    The aim of compiling the various essays presented here is to make readily accessible many of the most significant and influential discussions of privacy to be found in the literature. In addition to being representative of the diversity of attitudes toward privacy, this collection has a coherence that results from the authors' focus on the same issues and theories. The main issue addressed in this book is the moral significance of privacy. Some social science and legal treatments are included because (...)
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  26.  27
    Cohen on Inductive Probability and the Law of Evidence.Ferdinand Schoeman - 1987 - Philosophy of Science 54 (1):76-91.
    L. Jonathan Cohen has written a number of important books and articles in which he argues that mathematical probability provides a poor model of much of what paradigmatically passes for sound reasoning, whether this be in the sciences, in common discourse, or in the law. In his book, The Probable and the Provable, Cohen elaborates six paradoxes faced by advocates of mathematical probability (PM) when treating issues of evidence as they would arise in a court of law. He argues that (...)
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  27.  46
    Kant's Philosophy of Science.Eric Watkins & Marius Stan - 2014 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  28.  4
    Cellular Adaptation Relies on Regulatory Proteins Having Episodic Memory.Razvan C. Stan, Darshak K. Bhatt & Maristela M. De Camargo - forthcoming - Bioessays.
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  29.  8
    Agter Die Syfers is Gelowiges, Gemeentes En Die Kerk, ’N Prakties Teologiese Refleksie Oor Lidmaatskap.W. J. Schoeman - 2014 - Hts Theological Studies 70 (1).
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  30. Kant and the Object of Determinate Experience.Marius Stan - 2015 - Philosophers' Imprint 15:1-19.
    On an influential view, Newton's mechanics is built into Kant's very theory of exact knowledge. However, Newtonian dynamics had serious explanatory limits already known by 1750. Thus, we might worry that Kant's Analytic is too narrow to ground enough exact knowledge. In this paper, I draw on Enlightenment dynamics to show that Kant's notion of determinate objecthood is sufficiently broad, non-trivial, and still relevant to the present.
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  31.  99
    Parental Discretion and Children's Rights: Background and Implications for Medical Decision-Making.Ferdinand Schoeman - 1985 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10 (1):45-62.
    This paper argues that liberal tenats that justify intervention to promote the welfare of an incompetent do not suffice as a basis for analyzing parent-child relationships, and that this inadequacy is the basis for many of the problems that arise when thinking about the state's role in resolving family conflicts, particularly when monitoring parental discretion in medical decision-making on behalf of a child. The state may be limited by the best interest criterion when dealing with children, but parents are not. (...)
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  32. On Zhuangzi and Kierkegaard. [REVIEW]Hans-Georg Moeller & Leo Stan - 2003 - Philosophy East and West 53 (1):130 - 135.
  33. Newton and Wolff: The Leibnizian Reaction to the Principia, 1716-1763.Marius Stan - 2012 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):459-481.
    Newton rested his theory of mechanics on distinct metaphysical and epistemological foundations. After Leibniz's death in 1716, the Principia ran into sharp philosophical opposition from Christian Wolff and his disciples, who sought to subvert Newton's foundations or replace them with Leibnizian ideas. In what follows, I chronicle some of the Wolffians' reactions to Newton's notion of absolute space, his dynamical laws of motion, and his general theory of gravitation. I also touch on arguments advanced by Newton's Continental followers, such as (...)
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  34. Kant's Philosophy of Mechanics in 1758.Marius Stan - 2011 - In Oliver Thorndike (ed.), Rethinking Kant, vol. III. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 158-179.
  35. Perpetuum Mobiles and Eternity.Marius Stan - 2016 - In Yitzhak Melamed (ed.), Eternity: the History of a Concept. Oxford University Press. pp. 173-178.
    Leibniz is committed to a form of cosmic eternity, on account of his natural theology and foundations for dynamics. However, his views on perpetuum mobiles entail that a particularly attractive type of cosmic eternity is out of reach for Leibniz.
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  36. Privacy and Intimate Information.Ferdinand Schoeman - 1984 - In Ferdinand David Schoeman (ed.), Philosophical Dimensions of Privacy: An Anthology. Cambridge University Press. pp. 403--408.
  37.  7
    The Art of Being: Poetics of the Novel and Existentialist Philosophy by Yi-Ping Ong.Corina Stan - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):199-206.
    Yi-Ping Ong's The Art of Being: Poetics of the Novel and Existentialist Philosophy is a highly innovative book. It teases out from essays by Søren Kierkegaard, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Simone de Beauvoir an existentialist poetics of the novel, which then inspires thoughtful readings of freedom and self-consciousness, situated worldhood, and unfinished works of art in nineteenth-century novels. At every step, Ong carefully articulates the insights that set her study apart from established ways of understanding the novel as form, the legacy (...)
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  38.  9
    ’n Pastoraatsperspektief op dreigende werksverlies.Roelf Schoeman & Yolanda Dreyer - 2008 - Hts Theological Studies 64 (2).
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  39. Kierkegaard on Temporality and God Incarnate.Leo Stan - 2009 - In Philosophical Concepts and Religious Metaphors: New Perspectives on Phenomenology and Theology. pp. 237-254.
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  40. Rationalist Foundations and the Science of Force.Marius Stan - forthcoming - In Brandon Look & Frederick Beiser (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of German Eighteenth-Century Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  41. Review: Kant, Natural Science.Marius Stan - 2014 - Metascience 23 (1):65-70.
  42.  92
    Privacy: Philosophical Dimensions.Ferdinand Schoeman - 1984 - American Philosophical Quarterly 21 (3):199 - 213.
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  43.  21
    Responsibility and the Problem of Induced Desires.Ferdinand Schoeman - 1978 - Philosophical Studies 34 (3):293 - 301.
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  44.  4
    Vérités Sans Essence. Réflexions Post-Théoriques.Gerard Stan - 2016 - Meta: Research in Hermeneutics, Phenomenology, and Practical Philosophy 8 (1):199-218.
    Classical theories of truth are monistic, since they fundamentally search for the essence of truth. The correspondence theory of truth is the most representative in this regard. There are several difficulties with the essentialist theories of truth, which led to the emergence of several alternatives. The purpose of this article is to critically evaluate three of them: the pragmatic theory of truth, the deflationary theory and the pluralistic approach. I argue for overcoming monism and for accepting pluralism in our understanding (...)
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  45.  71
    Generosity as a Central Virtue in Nietzsche’s Ethics.Marinus Schoeman - 2007 - South African Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):17-30.
    Nietzsche's ethics is basically an ethics of virtue. In his own unique way, and in accordance with his extra-moral view of life, Nietzsche recovers and re-appropriates certain virtues – notably pagan, aristocratic virtues – as part of his project to reconceptualise (‘rehabilitate') the virtues in terms of virtù (virtuosity and vitality), to which he also refers as his ‘moraline-free' conception of the virtues. The virtue of generosity (in the sense of magnanimity) plays a central role in Nietzschean ethics. According to (...)
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  46.  68
    Aristotle on the Good of Friendship.Ferdinand Schoeman - 1985 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 63 (3):269 – 282.
  47.  37
    Statistical Vs. Direct Evidence.Ferdinand Schoeman - 1987 - Noûs 21 (2):179-198.
  48.  28
    On Incapacitating the Dangerous.Ferdinand D. Schoeman - 1979 - American Philosophical Quarterly 16 (1):27 - 35.
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  49.  16
    Response to H. Floris Cohen's Essay Review on Newtonian Scholarship.Marius Stan - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Science 52 (2):359-360.
    In a review of recent Newton scholarship, H. Floris Cohen charges that my paper is not a ‘case of worthwhile innovation, or even of any innovation at all’. I beg to differ.
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  50.  32
    From General to Special Metaphysics of Nature.Michael Bennett McNulty & Marius Stan - 2017 - In Matthew Altman (ed.), The Palgrave Kant Handbook. London: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 493-511.
    In his Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science, Kant presents the “pure part” of natural science – that is, the a priori principles holding of matter. This special metaphysics of matter is, Kant claims, grounded on the general metaphysics of nature described in the System of Principles of his first Critique. This chapter develops a comprehensive account of Kant’s framework for natural science that touches on interpretive issues that arise in the transition from general to special metaphysics and that outlines his (...)
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