27 found
Order:
  1.  6
    Making Researchers Moral: Why Trustworthiness Requires More Than Ethics Guidelines and Review.Linus Johnsson, Stefan Eriksson, Gert Helgesson & Mats G. Hansson - 2014 - Research Ethics 10 (1):29-46.
    Research ethics, once a platform for declaring intent, discussing moral issues and providing advice and guidance to researchers, has developed over time into an extra-legal regulatory system, complete with steering documents (ethics guidelines), overseeing bodies (research ethics committees) and formal procedures (informed consent). The process of institutionalizing distrust is usually motivated by reference to past atrocities committed in the name of research and the need to secure the trustworthiness of the research system. This article examines some limitations of this approach. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  2.  15
    Plagiarism in Research.Gert Helgesson & Stefan Eriksson - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (1):91-101.
  3.  42
    Taking Due Care: Moral Obligations in Dual Use Research.Frida Kuhlau, Stefan Eriksson, Kathinka Evers & Anna T. Höglund - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (9):477-487.
    In the past decade, the perception of a bioterrorist threat has increased and created a demand on life scientists to consider the potential security implications of dual use research. This article examines a selection of proposed moral obligations for life scientists that have emerged to meet these concerns and the extent to which they can be considered reasonable. It also describes the underlying reasons for the concerns, how they are managed, and their implications for scientific values. Five criteria for what (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  4.  32
    A Precautionary Principle for Dual Use Research in the Life Sciences.Frida Kuhlau, Anna T. Höglund, Kathinka Evers & Stefan Eriksson - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (1):1-8.
    Most life science research entails dual-use complexity and may be misused for harmful purposes, e.g. biological weapons. The Precautionary Principle applies to special problems characterized by complexity in the relationship between human activities and their consequences. This article examines whether the principle, so far mainly used in environmental and public health issues, is applicable and suitable to the field of dual-use life science research. Four central elements of the principle are examined: threat, uncertainty, prescription and action. Although charges against the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  5.  4
    The False Academy: Predatory Publishing in Science and Bioethics.Stefan Eriksson & Gert Helgesson - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (2):163-170.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  6.  17
    Ethical Deliberations About Involuntary Treatment: Interviews with Swedish Psychiatrists.Manne Sjöstrand, Lars Sandman, Petter Karlsson, Gert Helgesson, Stefan Eriksson & Niklas Juth - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-12.
    BackgroundInvoluntary treatment is a key issue in healthcare ethics. In this study, ethical issues relating to involuntary psychiatric treatment are investigated through interviews with Swedish psychiatrists.MethodsIn-depth interviews were conducted with eight Swedish psychiatrists, focusing on their experiences of and views on compulsory treatment. In relation to this, issues about patient autonomy were also discussed. The interviews were analysed using a descriptive qualitative approach.ResultsThe answers focus on two main aspects of compulsory treatment. Firstly, deliberations about when and why it was justifiable (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7.  34
    Paternalism in the Name of Autonomy.Manne Sjöstrand, Stefan Eriksson, Niklas Juth & Gert Helgesson - 2013 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (6):jht049.
    Different ideas of the normative relevance of autonomy can give rise to profoundly different action-guiding principles in healthcare. If autonomy is seen as a value rather than as a right, it can be argued that patients’ decisions should sometimes be overruled in order to protect or promote their own autonomy. We refer to this as paternalism in the name of autonomy. In this paper, we discuss different elements of autonomy (decision-making capacity, efficiency, and authenticity) and arguments in favor of paternalism (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  8.  31
    Do Ethical Guidelines Give Guidance? A Critical Examination of Eight Ethics Regulations.Stefan Eriksson, Anna T. Höglund & Gert Helgesson - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (1):15-29.
    The number of legal and nonlegal ethical regulations in the biomedical field has increased tremendously, leaving present-day practitioners and researchers in a virtual crossfire of legislations and guidelines. Judging by the production and by the way these regulations are motivated and presented, they are held to be of great importance to ethical practice. This view is shared by many commentators. For instance, Commons and Baldwin write that, within the nursing profession, patient care can be performed unethically or ethically depending on (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  9.  22
    Adequate Trust Avails, Mistaken Trust Matters: On the Moral Responsibility of Doctors as Proxies for Patients' Trust in Biobank Research.Linus Johnsson, Gert Helgesson, Mats G. Hansson & Stefan Eriksson - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (9):485-492.
    In Sweden, most patients are recruited into biobank research by non-researcher doctors. Patients' trust in doctors may therefore be important to their willingness to participate. We suggest a model of trust that makes sense of such transitions of trust between domains and distinguishes adequate trust from mistaken trust. The unique position of doctors implies, we argue, a Kantian imperfect duty to compensate for patients' mistaken trust. There are at least three kinds of mistaken trust, each of which requires a different (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  10.  9
    Conceptions of Decision-Making Capacity in Psychiatry: Interviews with Swedish Psychiatrists.Manne Sjöstrand, Petter Karlsson, Lars Sandman, Gert Helgesson, Stefan Eriksson & Niklas Juth - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):34.
    Decision-making capacity is a key concept in contemporary healthcare ethics. Previous research has mainly focused on philosophical, conceptual issues or on evaluation of different tools for assessing patients’ capacity. The aim of the present study is to investigate how the concept and its normative role are understood in Swedish psychiatric care. Of special interest for present purposes are the relationships between decisional capacity and psychiatric disorders and between health law and practical ethics.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11. Autonomy-Based Arguments Against Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Critique. [REVIEW]Manne Sjöstrand, Gert Helgesson, Stefan Eriksson & Niklas Juth - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):225-230.
    Respect for autonomy is typically considered a key reason for allowing physician assisted suicide and euthanasia. However, several recent papers have claimed this to be grounded in a misconception of the normative relevance of autonomy. It has been argued that autonomy is properly conceived of as a value, and that this makes assisted suicide as well as euthanasia wrong, since they destroy the autonomy of the patient. This paper evaluates this line of reasoning by investigating the conception of valuable autonomy. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  4
    Why Participating in Scientific Research is a Moral Duty.Joanna Forsberg, Mats Hansson & Stefan Eriksson - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (5):325-328.
    Our starting point in this article is the debate between John Harris and Iain Brassington on whether or not there is a duty to take part in scientific research. We consider the arguments that have been put forward based on fairness and a duty to rescue, and suggest an alternative justification grounded in a hypothetical agreement: that is, because effective healthcare cannot be taken for granted, but requires continuous medical research, and nobody knows what kind of healthcare they will need, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  3
    The Role of Guidelines in Ethical Competence-Building: Perceptions Among Research Nurses and Physicians.Anna T. Höglund, Stefan Eriksson & Gert Helgesson - 2010 - Clinical Ethics 5 (2):95-102.
    The aim of the present study was to describe and explore the perception of ethical guidelines and their role in ethical competence-building among Swedish physicians and research nurses. Twelve informants were interviewed in depth. The results demonstrated that the informants had a critical attitude towards ethical guidelines and claimed to make little use of them in practical moral judgements. Ethical competence was seen primarily as character-building, related to virtues such as being empathic, honest and loyal to patients. Ethical competence was (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  14.  34
    Does Informed Consent Have an Expiry Date? A Critical Reappraisal of Informed Consent as a Process.Gert Helgesson & Stefan Eriksson - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):85-92.
    Informed consent is central to modern research ethics. Informed consent procedures have mainly been justified in terms of respect for autonomy, the core idea being that it should be every competent individual’s right to decide for herself whether or not to participate in scientific studies. A number of conditions are normally raised with regard to morally valid informed consent. These include that potential research subjects get adequate information, understand those aspects that are relevant to them, and, based on that information, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  15
    Provide Expertise or Facilitate Ethical Reflection? A Comment on the Debate Between Cowley and Crosthwaite.Stefan Eriksson, Gert Helgesson & Pär Segerdahl - 2006 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (3):389-392.
  16.  24
    You Can Use My Name; You Don't Have to Steal My Story – a Critique of Anonymity in Indigenous Studies.Anna-lydia Svalastog & Stefan Eriksson - 2010 - Developing World Bioethics 10 (2):104-110.
    Our claim in this paper is that not being identified as the data source might cause harm to a person or group. Therefore, in some cases the default of anonymisation should be replaced by a careful deliberation, together with research subjects, of how to handle the issues of identification and confidentiality. Our prime example in this article is community participatory research and similar endeavours on indigenous groups. The theme, content and aim of the research, and the question of how to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  6
    Responsibility for Scientific Misconduct in Collaborative Papers.Gert Helgesson & Stefan Eriksson - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (3):423-430.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  41
    Four Themes in Recent Swedish Bioethics Debates.Gert Helgesson & Stefan Eriksson - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (3):409-417.
    A wide variety of bioethical themes have recently been debated and researched in Sweden, including genetic screening, HPV vaccination strategies, end-of-life care, injustices and priority setting in healthcare, dual-use research, and the never-ending story of scientific fraud. Also, there are some new events related to Swedish biobanking that might be of general interest. Here we will concentrate on four themes: end-of-life care, dual-use research, scientific fraud, and biobanking.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Do Ethical Guidelines Give Guidance? A Critical Examination of Eight Ethics Regulations.Stefan Eriksson, Anna Hoglund & Gert Helgesson - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (1):15-29.
    The number of legal and nonlegal ethical regulations in the biomedical field has increased tremendously, leaving present-day practitioners and researchers in a virtual crossfire of legislations and guidelines. Judging by the production and by the way these regulations are motivated and presented, they are held to be of great importance to ethical practice. This view is shared by many commentators. For instance, Commons and Baldwin write that, within the nursing profession, patient care can be performed unethically or ethically depending on (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20.  17
    The Moral Primacy of the Human Being: A Reply to Parker.Gert Helgesson & Stefan Eriksson - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (1):56-57.
    In a previous paper in the Journal of Medical Ethics, the authors argued that the research ethical principle stating that the individual shall have priority over science, found in many guidelines, is utterly unclear and because of this should be explicated or otherwise deleted. In a recent commentary, Parker argued that this leaves us defending a position that would allow totalitarian regimes to pursue glory at the expense of its citizens. The present response addresses this and similar accusations.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  8
    Autonomy is a Right, Not a Feat: How Theoretical Misconceptions Have Muddled the Debate on Dynamic Consent to Biobank Research.Linus Johnsson & Stefan Eriksson - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (7):471-478.
    Should people be involved as active participants in longitudinal medical research, as opposed to remaining passive providers of data and material? We argue in this article that misconceptions of ‘autonomy’ as a kind of feat rather than a right are to blame for much of the confusion surrounding the debate of dynamic versus broad consent. Keeping in mind two foundational facts of human life, freedom and dignity, we elaborate three moral principles – those of autonomy, integrity and authority – to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  20
    On the Need for Improved Protections of Incapacitated and Non-Benefiting Research Subjects.Stefan Eriksson - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (1):15-21.
    In this article, it is claimed that the protective provisions for adults with impaired decision-making capacity are misguided, insofar as they do not conclusively state whether research on this group should be permitted only as an exception, and as they arbitrarily allow for some groups to benefit from such research while others will not. Moreover, the presumed or former will of the subject is given insufficient weight, and the minimal risk standard does not make sense in this context. Because of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  5
    When Character Is More Important Than Intelligence.Stefan Eriksson - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (1):65-67.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  6
    When Character Is More Important Than Intelligence. Review of Carl Elliott, Ed.Slow Cures and Bad Philosophers: Essays on Wittgenstein, Medicine, and Bioethics.Stefan Eriksson - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (1):65-67.
  25. Att fly och illa fäkta.Stefan Eriksson - 1999 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 4.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Det förrädiskt enkla.Stefan Eriksson - 1999 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 4.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Recension av D. Z. Philips’ Filosofi – en presentation. [REVIEW]Stefan Eriksson - 2002 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 3.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography