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  1. Google in China: A Manager-Friendly Heuristic Model for Resolving Cross-Cultural Ethical Conflicts.J. Brooke Hamilton, Stephen B. Knouse & Vanessa Hill - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):143-157.
    Management practitioners and scholars have worked diligently to identify methods for ethical decision making in international contexts. Theoretical frameworks such as Integrative Social Contracts Theory (Donaldson and Dunfee, 1994, Academy of Management Review 19, 252–284) and more recently the Global Business Citizenship Approach [Wood et al., 2006, Global Business Citizenship: A Transformative Framework for Ethics and Sustainable Capitalism. (M. E. Sharpe, Armonk, NY)] have produced innovations in practice. Despite these advances, many managers have difficulty implementing these theoretical concepts in daily (...)
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  2.  75
    Multinational enterprise decision principles for dealing with cross cultural ethical conflicts.J. Brooke Hamilton & Stephen B. Knouse - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 31 (1):77 - 94.
    Cross cultural ethical conflicts are a major challenge for managers of multinational corporations (MNEs) when an MNE''s business practices and a host country''s practices differ. We develop a set of decision principles to help MNE managers deal with these conflicts and illustrate with examples of ethical conflicts faced by MNEs doing business in contemporary Russia (DeGeorge, 1994). We discuss the generalizability of the principles by comparing them to the Donaldson (1989) and Buller and Kohls (1997) decision models. Finally we discuss (...)
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  3.  28
    Multinational Enterprise Decision Principles for Dealing With Cross Cultural Ethical Conflicts.J. Brooke Hamilton Iii & Stephen B. Knouse - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 31 (1):77-94.
    Cross cultural ethical conflicts are a major challenge for managers of multinational corporations (MNEs) when an MNE's business practices and a host country's practices differ. We develop a set of decision principles to help MNE managers deal with these conflicts and illustrate with examples of ethical conflicts faced by MNEs doing business in contemporary Russia (DeGeorge, 1994). We discuss the generalizability of the principles by comparing them to the Donaldson (1989) and Buller and Kohls (1997) decision models. Finally we discuss (...)
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  4.  29
    Willingness to report unethical behavior in exit surveys.Robert A. Giacalone, Stephen B. Knouse & Hinda G. Pollard - 1999 - Teaching Business Ethics 3 (4):307-319.
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  5.  36
    Back to Heuristic Questions: A Manager-Friendly Approach to Resolving Cross Cultural Ethical Conflicts.J. Brooke Hamilton Iii, Stephen B. Knouse & Vanessa Hll - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:39-44.
    Management practitioners and scholars have worked diligently to identify methods for ethical decision making in international contexts. In this paper we offer sixheuristic questions to help corporate managers resolve cross-cultural ethical conflicts involving questionable business practices in a host country. Our aim is to provide practical guidance for discussion within a firm on whether or not to do business the firm’s way, the host’s way or refrain from doing business there (the highway).
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  6. Ethical decision-making in business: Behavioral issues and concerns. [REVIEW]Stephen B. Knouse & Robert A. Giacalone - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (5-6):369 - 377.
    This article examines selected behavioral aspects of ethical decision making within a business context. Three categories of antecedents to ethical decision behaviors (individual differences, interpersonal variables, and organizational variables) are examined and propositions are offered. Moral development theory and expectancy theory are then explored as possible bases for a theory of ethical decision making. Finally, means of improving ethical decision making in firms are explored.
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  7.  63
    Justifying wrongful employee behavior: The role of personality in organizational sabotage. [REVIEW]Robert A. Giacalone & Stephen B. Knouse - 1990 - Journal of Business Ethics 9 (1):55 - 61.
    The role that personality plays in the justification of organizational sabotage behavior was examined. In a two phase study, 120 business students were first surveyed to create a list of 51 methods of sabotage. In the second phase, 274 other business students rated justifiability of the 51 methods and completed Machiavellian and hostility scales. A factor analysis of the justification ratings yielded four factors: (1) methods of sabotaging company profits and production, (2) informational sabotage, (3) violent and illegal methods, and (...)
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  8.  54
    Transforming personal experience into a pedagogical tool: Ethical complaints. [REVIEW]Carole L. Jurkiewicz, Robert A. Giacalone & Stephen B. Knouse - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 53 (3):283-295.
    If students are to understand ethical problems at work, practical applications are essential in translating classroom learning into real world knowledge. This article describes the ethical complaint letter as one pedagogical approach for MBA students to understanding real world ethical situations. Students write an objective, fact-filled complaint letter to an organization that has behaved in an unethical manner toward them. A specific assignment protocol is presented for the students and for discussing organizational responses in class. Finally, an examination of expected (...)
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  9.  40
    The Ethical Aftermath of a Values Revolution: Theoretical Bases of Change, Recalibration, and Principalization. [REVIEW]Robert A. Giacalone, Carole L. Jurkiewicz & Stephen B. Knouse - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):333-343.
    Profound and wide-ranging values shifts among industrialized nations, first noted following World War II and measured on an ongoing basis since, have affected individual decision making in political, social, and institutional settings across the globe. Consequently, the adoption of this set of expansive values is having pronounced and measurable effects on organizational missions, standards, and activities. This change is particularly notable in terms of accountability practices, moral responsibility, and the distinction between ethical and unethical decision making. This article documents this (...)
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