Results for 'Stephen Bear'

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  1. The Impact of Board Diversity and Gender Composition on Corporate Social Responsibility and Firm Reputation.Stephen Bear, Noushi Rahman & Corinne Post - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):207 - 221.
    This article explores how the diversity of board resources and the number of women on boards affect firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR) ratings, and how, in turn, CSR influences corporate reputation. In addition, this article examines whether CSR ratings mediate the relationships among board resource diversity, gender composition, and corporate reputation. The OLS regression results using lagged data for independent and control variables were statistically significant for the gender composition hypotheses, but not for the resource diversitybased hypotheses. CSR ratings had (...)
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  2. Lectures and Essays, Ed. By L. Stephen and F. Pollock.William Kingdon Clifford & Leslie Stephen - 1879
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  3. Sir Leslie Stephen's Mausoleum Book.Leslie Stephen - 1977 - Oxford University Press UK.
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  4.  11
    Tench Coxe and the Right to Keep and Bear Arms, 1787-1823.David B. Kopel & Stephen P. Halbrook - unknown
    Tench Coxe, a member of the second rank of this nation's Founders and a leading proponent of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, wrote prolifically about the right to keep and bear arms. In this Article, the authors trace Coxe's story, from his early writings in support of the Constitution, through his years of public service, to his political writings in opposition to the presidential campaigns of John Adams and John Quincy Adams. The authors note that Coxe described (...)
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  5.  25
    Perceiving Expressions of Emotion: What Evidence Could Bear on Questions About Perceptual Experience of Mental States?Stephen A. Butterfill - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 36:438-451.
  6.  9
    T. Drew-Bear, C. Naour, R. S. Stroud: Arthur Pullinger: An Early Traveler in Syria and Asia Minor. Pp. Ix + 80; 8 Plates. Chico, CA: Scholars Press, 1985. $15. [REVIEW]Stephen Mitchell - 1987 - The Classical Review 37 (1):120-120.
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  7.  29
    T. Drew-Bear, C. Naour, R. S. Stroud: Arthur Pullinger: An Early Traveler in Syria and Asia Minor. (Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, 75.3.) Pp. Ix + 80; 8 Plates. Chico, CA: Scholars Press, 1985. $15. [REVIEW]Stephen Mitchell - 1987 - The Classical Review 37 (01):120-.
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  8.  20
    Francois-David Sebbah: Testing the Limit: Derrida, Henry, Levinas, and the Phenomenological Tradition (Translated by Stephen Barker).Jeffrey Hanson - 2013 - Continental Philosophy Review 46 (4):609-616.
    Sebbah’s noteworthy book is perhaps the first sustained inquiry into the relationship between three thinkers in the French phenomenological tradition, two of whom are well known in the Anglophone world (Levinas, Derrida) and one of whom (Henry) is gradually better understood by English-speaking audiences. That all three are arrayed together in this study makes it a pioneering enterprise and one that allows the English reader to apprise the worthiness of Henry’s association with his better-known compatriots.The strongest and most extensive portions (...)
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  9.  58
    Political Theory and Postmodernism.Stephen K. White - 1991 - Cambridge University Press.
    Postmodernism has evoked great controversy and it continues to do so today, as it disseminates into general discourse. Some see its principles, such as its fundamental resistance to metanarratives, as frighteningly disruptive, while a growing number are reaping the benefits of its innovative perspective. In Political Theory and Postmodernism, Stephen K. White outlines a path through the postmodern problematic by distinguishing two distinct ways of thinking about the meaning of responsibility, one prevalent in modern and the other in postmodern (...)
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  10. The Political Responsibilities of Everyday Bystanders.Stephen L. Esquith - 2011 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    In a world where every person is exposed daily through the mass media to images of violence and suffering, as most dramatically exemplified in recent years by the ongoing tragedy in Darfur, the question naturally arises: What responsibilities do we, as bystanders to such social injustice, bear in holding accountable those who have created the conditions for this suffering? And what is our own complicity in the continuance of such violence—indeed, how do we contribute to and benefit from it? (...)
     
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  11.  24
    The Construal of Reality: Criticism in Modern and Postmodern Science.Stephen Toulmin - 1982 - Critical Inquiry 9 (1):93-111.
    The hermeneutic movement in philosophy and criticism has done us a service by directing our attention to the role of critical interpretation in understanding the humanities. But it has done us a disservice also because it does not recognize any comparable role for interpretation in the natural sciences and in this way sharply separates the two fields of scholarship and experience.1 Consequently, I shall argue, the central truths and virtues of hermeneutics have become encumbered with a whole string of false (...)
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  12.  46
    The Implausibility and Low Explanatory Power of the Resurrection Hypothesis—With a Rejoinder to Stephen T. Davis.Robert Greg Cavin & Carlos A. Colombetti - 2020 - Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry 2 (1):37-94.
    We respond to Stephen T. Davis’ criticism of our earlier essay, “Assessing the Resurrection Hypothesis.” We argue that the Standard Model of physics is relevant and decisive in establishing the implausibility and low explanatory power of the Resurrection hypothesis. We also argue that the laws of physics have entailments regarding God and the supernatural and, against Alvin Plantinga, that these same laws lack the proviso “no agent supernaturally interferes.” Finally, we offer Bayesian arguments for the Legend hypothesis and against (...)
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  13. Professor William Craig’s Criticisms of Critiques of Kalam Cosmological Arguments By Paul Davies, Stephen Hawking, and Adolf Grunbaum.Graham Oppy - 1995 - Faith and Philosophy 12 (2):237-250.
    Kalam cosmological arguments have recently been the subject of criticisms, at least inter alia, by physicists---Paul Davies, Stephen Hawking---and philosophers of science---Adolf Grunbaum. In a series of recent articles, William Craig has attempted to show that these criticisms are “superficial, iII-conceived, and based on misunderstanding.” I argue that, while some of the discussion of Davies and Hawking is not philosophically sophisticated, the points raised by Davies, Hawking and Grunbaum do suffice to undermine the dialectical efficacy of kalam cosmological arguments.
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  14. Stephen Davies, The Artful Species: Aesthetics, Art, and Evolution (2013).John Powell - 2013 - Literature & Aesthetics 23 (2):1-1.
    This review article critiques Stephen Davies' The Artful Species: Aesthetics, Art, and Evolution.
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  15. The Moral Right to Keep and Bear Firearms.C'Zar Bernstein, Timothy Hsiao & Matthew Palumbo - 2015 - Public Affairs Quarterly 29 (4).
    The moral right to keep and bear arms is entailed by the moral right of self-defense. We argue that the ownership and use of firearms is a reasonable means of exercising these rights. Given their defensive value, there is a strong presumption in favor of enacting civil rights to keep and bear arms ranging from handguns to ‘assault rifles.’ Thus, states are morally obliged as a matter of justice to recognize basic liberties for firearm ownership and usage. Throughout (...)
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  16. Seeing Red: The Metaphysics of Colours Without the Physics.Michael Watkins - 2005 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (1):33-52.
    By treating colours as sui generis intrinsic properties of objects we can maintain that (1) colours are causally responsible for colour experiences (and so agree with the physicalist) and (2) colours, along with the similarity and difference relations that colours bear to one another, are presented to us by casual observation (and so agree with the dispositionalist). The major obstacle for such a view is the causal overdetermination of colour experience. Borrowing and expanding on the works of Sydney Shoemaker (...)
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  17.  83
    Scare Quotes and Their Relation to Other Semantic Issues.Stefano Predelli - 2003 - Linguistics and Philosophy 26 (1):1-28.
    The main aim of this paper is that of providing a unified analysis for some interesting uses of quotation marks, including so-called scare quotes. The phenomena exemplified by the cases I discuss have remained relatively unexplored, notwithstanding a growing interest in the behavior of quotation marks. They are, however, of no lesser interest than other, more widely studied effectsachieved with the help of quotationmarks. In particular, as I argue in whatfollows, scare quotes and other similar instances bear interesting relations (...)
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  18. Necessary Assumptions.Gilbert Plumer - 1999 - Informal Logic 19 (1):41-61.
    In their book EVALUATING CRITICAL THINKING Stephen Norris and Robert Ennis say: “Although it is tempting to think that certain [unstated] assumptions are logically necessary for an argument or position, they are not. So do not ask for them.” Numerous writers of introductory logic texts as well as various highly visible standardized tests (e.g., the LSAT and GRE) presume that the Norris/Ennis view is wrong; the presumption is that many arguments have (unstated) necessary assumptions and that readers and test (...)
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  19.  18
    Sense Data and Logical Relations: Karin Costelloe-Stephen and Russell’s Critique of Bergson.Andreas Vrahimis - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-26.
    Though scholarship has explored Karin Costelloe-Stephen’s contributions to the history of psychoanalysis, as well as her relations to the Bloomsbury Group, her philosophical work has been almost completely ignored. This paper will examine her debate with Bertrand Russell over his criticism of Bergson. Costelloe-Stephen had employed the terminology of early analytic philosophy in presenting a number of arguments in defence of Bergson’s views. Costelloe-Stephen would object, among other things, to Russell’s use of an experiment which, as she (...)
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  20. Introduction.Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith - 2012 - In Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith (eds.), Global Justice. Ashgate.
    This volume brings together a range of influential essays by distinguished philosophers and political theorists on the issue of global justice. Global justice concerns the search for ethical norms that should govern interactions between people, states, corporations and other agents acting in the global arena, as well as the design of social institutions that link them together. The volume includes articles that engage with major theoretical questions such as the applicability of the ideals of social and economic equality to the (...)
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  21. What Does It Mean to Be a Mechanism? Stephen Morse, Non-Reductivism, and Mental Causation.Katrina L. Sifferd - 2014 - Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-17.
    Stephen Morse seems to have adopted a controversial position regarding the mindbody relationship: John Searle’s non-reductivism, which claims that conscious mental states are causal yet not reducible to their underlying brain states. Searle’s position has been roundly criticized, with some arguing the theory taken as a whole is incoherent. In this paper I review these criticisms and add my own, concluding that Searle’s position is indeed contradictory, both internally and with regard to Morse's other views. Thus I argue that (...)
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  22. Response to Stephen Law on the Evolutionary Argument Against Naturalism.Calum Miller - 2015 - Philosophia 43 (1):147-152.
    Alvin Plantinga’s evolutionary argument against naturalism argues that the probability of our possessing reliable cognitive faculties, given the truth of evolution and naturalism, is low, and that this provides a defeater for naturalism, if the naturalist in question holds to the general truths of evolutionary biology. Stephen Law has recently objected to Plantinga’s evolutionary argument against naturalism by suggesting that there exist conceptual constraints governing the content a belief can have given its relationships to other things, including behaviour . (...)
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  23. Weight for Stephen Finlay.Daan Evers - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 163 (3):737-749.
    According to Stephen Finlay, ‘A ought to X’ means that X-ing is more conducive to contextually salient ends than relevant alternatives. This in turn is analysed in terms of probability. I show why this theory of ‘ought’ is hard to square with a theory of a reason’s weight which could explain why ‘A ought to X’ logically entails that the balance of reasons favours that A X-es. I develop two theories of weight to illustrate my point. I first look (...)
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  24. Are There a Posteriori Conceptual Necessities?Daniel Dohrn - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 155 (2):181-197.
    I critically assess Stephen Yablo’s claim that cassinis are ovals is an a posteriori conceptual necessity. One does not know it simply by mastering the relevant concepts but by substantial empirical scrutiny. Yablo represents narrow content by would have turned out -conditionals. An epistemic reading of such conditionals does not bear Yablo’s claim. Two metaphysically laden readings are considered. In one reading, Yablo’s conditionals test under what circumstances concepts remain the same while their extensions diverge. As an alternative, (...)
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  25. Stephen Jay Gould.Massimo Pigliucci - 2007 - In T. Flynn (ed.), The New Encyclopedia of Unbelief. Prometheus.
    A brief biography of evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould.
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  26.  78
    Stephen Davis’s Objection to the Second Ontological Argument.Bashar Alhoch - 2016 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 80 (1):3-9.
    Stephen Davis has argued that the second ontological argument fails as a theistic proof because it ignores the logical possibility of what he calls an ontologically impossible being. By an “ontologically impossible being” he means a being that does not exist, logically-possibly exists, and would exist necessarily if it existed. In this brief essay, I argue, first, that even if an OIB is logically possible, its logical possibility is irrelevant to the OA at issue; and second, that an OIB (...)
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  27.  15
    The Black Bear Hunt in New Jersey: A Constructionist Analysis of an Intractable Conflict.Dave Harker & Diane Bates - 2007 - Society and Animals 15 (4):329-352.
    The black bear hunt in New Jersey represents a symbolic clash of understandings about how human beings should live with nonhuman animals who typify intractable conflicts involving potentially dangerous mammals. Manifest and latent content analysis of newspaper editorial materials—written over a 10-year period, ending in 2005—document 2 findings. First, hunt supporters and opponents promote specific constructions of bears, hunters, and other actors in their letters and editorials. Second, these constructions are not only different but contradictory. Opponents and supporters portray (...)
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  28. Teaching & Learning Guide For: Contemporary Virtue Ethics.Karen Stohr - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (1):102-107.
    Virtue ethics is now well established as a substantive, independent normative theory. It was not always so. The revival of virtue ethics was initially spurred by influential criticisms of other normative theories, especially those made by Elizabeth Anscombe, Philippa Foot, John McDowell, Alasdair MacIntyre, and Bernard Williams. 1 Because of this heritage, virtue ethics is often associated with anti-theory movements in ethics and more recently, moral particularism. There are, however, quite a few different approaches to ethics that can reasonably claim (...)
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  29.  59
    Thinking About Earth, 20 Years Later: Reconsidering Stephen Clark's Ecological Theology. Feehan - 2014 - Journal of Animal Ethics 4 (2):93-98,.
    This review commemorates the 20th anniversary of Stephen Clark’s explication of ecological thought. After appraising both philosophical and theological perspectives, Clark argues that society must awaken to Earth’s “Otherness.” I describe Clark’s ecological consciousness and highlight the significance of his book for 21st-century readers.
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  30.  30
    European Philosophy and Original Sin in Stephen Mulhall.Judith Wolfe - 2017 - New Blackfriars 98 (1076):387-398.
    Stephen Mulhall has distinguished himself as one of the most rigorous and constructive contemporary thinkers on European philosophy and its complicated relationship to Christian theology. A prominent locus of that relationship in his work is the Christian doctrine of original sin, and its criticism but also structural recapitulation in the work of Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre and others. This article begins with an overview of relevant themes and their development in Mulhall's writings. I then offer an account of the internal (...)
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  31.  44
    A New Negentropic Subject: Reviewing Michel Serres' Biogea.A. Staley Groves - 2012 - Continent 2 (2):155-158.
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 155–158 Michel Serres. Biogea . Trans. Randolph Burks. Minneapolis: Univocal Publishing. 2012. 200 pp. | ISBN 9781937561086 | $22.95 Conveying to potential readers the significance of a book puts me at risk of glad handing. It’s not in my interest to laud the undeserving, especially on the pages of this journal. This is not a sales pitch, but rather an affirmation of a necessary work on very troubled terms: human, earth, nature, and the problematic world we made. (...)
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  32.  70
    Teaching & Learning Guide For: The Ins and Outs of Introspection.Philip Robbins - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (5):1100-1102.
    Philosophical interest in introspection has a long and storied history, but only recently – with the 'scientific turn' in philosophy of mind – have philosophers sought to ground their accounts of introspection in psychological data. In particular, there is growing awareness of how evidence from clinical and developmental psychology might be brought to bear on long-standing debates about the architecture of introspection, especially in the form of apparent dissociations between introspection and third-person mental-state attribution. It is less often noticed (...)
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  33.  28
    Falibilismo E a falácia de contrafactuais epistêmicos segundo Stephen Hetherington.Sérgio Luís Barroso de Carvalho - 2014 - Cadernos Do Pet Filosofia 5 (10):53-61.
    Stephen Hetherington é um dos mais proeminentes epistemólogos a defender que é possível ter conhecimento segundo as condições de crença verdadeira e justificada, apesar dos contraexemplos elaborados por Edmund Gettier. Ele fundamentou sua perspectiva no pressuposto de falibilidade do conhecimento e naquilo que ele chamou de "falácia de contrafactuais epistêmicos", segundo a qual não se deve assumir impossibilidade do conhecimento factual apenas em virtude da sua impossibilidade contrafactual - o que é reiterado por Anthony Booth. As críticas apresentadas por (...)
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  34.  37
    Belief: An Essay.Jamie Iredell - 2011 - Continent 1 (4):279-285.
    continent. 1.4 (2011): 279—285. Concerning its Transitive Nature, the Conversion of Native Americans of Spanish Colonial California, Indoctrinated Catholicism, & the Creation There’s no direct archaeological evidence that Jesus ever existed. 1 I memorized the Act of Contrition. I don’t remember it now, except the beginning: Forgive me Father for I have sinned . . . This was in preparation for the Sacrament of Holy Reconciliation, where in a confessional I confessed my sins to Father Scott, who looked like Jesus, (...)
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  35.  32
    Facts as Pleonastic Truth-Makers for Pleonastic Propositions.Giorgio Volpe - manuscript
    One often hears the claim that fact-based versions of the correspondence theory of truth face a disruptive dilemma: ‘if all true propositions correspond to the same fact, the notion is useless, and if every [true] proposition corresponds to a distinct fact, then the notion becomes idle’ (Engel 2002, 21). The assumption underlying this claim is that all conceptions of facts can be assigned to either of two categories. The first includes those conceptions according to which facts are so coarse-grained that (...)
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  36.  29
    Captive Bears in Human–Animal Welfare Conflict: A Case Study of Bile Extraction on Asia’s Bear Farms. [REVIEW]Ryunosuke Kikuchi - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (1):55-77.
    Bear bile has long been used in the Asian traditional pharmacopoeia. Bear farming first started in China ~30 years ago in terms of reducing the number of poached bears and ensuring the supply of bear bile. Approximately 13,000 bears are today captivated on Asia’s bear farms: their teeth are broken and the claws are also pulled out for the sake of human safety; the bears are imprisoned in squeeze cages for years; and a catheter is daily (...)
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  37.  5
    The Making of the Bear: Further Thoughts on the Printing of the Second Edition of Leviathan.Noel Malcolm - 2007 - Hobbes Studies 20 (1):2-39.
    In a previous study the author proposed that the second edition of Leviathan arose from an abortive attempt to print the text in London in 1670, and consisted partly of sheets salvaged from that attempt, and partly of new sheets printed in Amsterdam later in the 1670s. This article defends and amplifies that account of the printing. It responds to the alternative account presented by the late Karl Schuhmann, noting some problematic features of his theory; it considers the evidence of (...)
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  38. Blade Runner.Amy Coplan & David Davies (eds.) - 2015 - Routledge.
    Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner is widely regarded as a "masterpiece of modern cinema" and is regularly ranked as one of the great films of all time. Set in a dystopian future where the line between human beings and ‘replicants’ is blurred, the film raises a host of philosophical questions about what it is to be human, the possibility of moral agency and freedom in ‘created’ life forms, and the capacity of cinema to make a genuine contribution to our engagement with (...)
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  39. Economists in Discussion the Correspondence Between G.L.S. Shackle and Stephen F. Frowen, 1951-1992.Stephen F. Frowen & G. L. S. Shackle - 2004
  40. Edmund Burke and the Natural Law. [REVIEW]O. F. M. Rumold Fennessy - 1959 - Philosophical Studies 9:181-184.
    The purpose of this book is to show that “far from being an enemy of Natural Law, Burke was one of the most eloquent and profound defenders of Natural Law morality and politics in Western civilization”. Professor Stanlis rightly points out that Burke was for too long treated as a utilitarian in politics, and he blames such writers as Morley, Stephen and Vaughan, who were mainly responsible for this interpretation. He might have added that Burke himself must bear (...)
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  41. Norbert Elias and Human Interdependencies.Thomas Salumets - 2002 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    While the opposing paradigms of globalization and fragmentation compete in often bloody and destructive ways in the world today, this book convincingly reminds us of the importance of finding out more about the complex and changing ways in which we are connected. The authors demonstrate that the more we understand our connectedness and deal with its consequences, the less dependent and helpless we become. The critical, multidisciplinary perspectives they offer cover a wide range of subjects, from the world wide web (...)
     
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  42. The Toulmin Method Exploration and Controversy : A Festschrift in Honor of Stephen E. Toulmin.Betty Kay Seibt, William Edward Tanner & Stephen Edelston Toulmin - 1991
     
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  43. Harm to Species? Species, Ethics, and Climate Change: The Case of the Polar Bear.Clare Palmer - 2009 - Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 23 (2):587-604.
  44. Evidence, Miracles, and the Existence of Jesus: Comments on Stephen Law.Robert Greg Cavin & Carlos A. Colombetti - 2014 - Faith and Philosophy 31 (2):204-216.
    We use Bayesian tools to assess Law’s skeptical argument against the historicity of Jesus. We clarify and endorse his sub-argument for the conclusion that there is good reason to be skeptical about the miracle claims of the New Testament. However, we dispute Law’s contamination principle that he claims entails that we should be skeptical about the existence of Jesus. There are problems with Law’s defense of his principle, and we show, more importantly, that it is not supported by Bayesian considerations. (...)
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  45. Aristotle on Modality: Stephen Makin.Stephen Makin - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):143-161.
    [Stephen Makin] Aristotle draws two sets of distinctions in Metaphysics 9.2, first between non-rational and rational capacities, and second between one way and two way capacities. He then argues for three claims: [A] if a capacity is rational, then it is a two way capacity [B] if a capacity is non-rational, then it is a one way capacity [C] a two way capacity is not indifferently related to the opposed outcomes to which it can give rise I provide explanations (...)
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  46.  25
    „Wie Man der Hegelschen Philosophie Beibringt, Englisch Zu Sprechen“: Stephen Houlgate, Interviewt von Max Gottschlich.Max Gottschlich & Stephen Houlgate - 2018 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 66 (4):532-557.
    Stephen Houlgate is one of the leading Hegel scholars of the English-speaking world. In this interview he explains how he became a “Hegelian” while studying in Cambridge, and he offers a fundamental profile of his account of Hegel. The interview addresses the following questions: Why does Houlgate consider Hegel’s philosophy to be the “consummate critical philosophy”? What are the main barriers to a proper access to Hegel’s thought? Why is logic as dialectical logic still indispensable for philosophical thought? And (...)
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  47.  35
    Philosophy and Theology in the Long Middle Ages: A Tribute to Stephen F. Brown.Kent Emery, Russell L. Friedman, Andreas Speer, Maxime Mauriege & Stephen F. Brown (eds.) - 2011 - Brill.
    The title of this Festschrift to Stephen Brown points to the understanding of medieval philosophy and theology in the longue durée of their traditions and discourses.
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  48.  46
    Victorian Critics of Democracy: Carlyle, Ruskin, Arnold, Stephen, Maine, Lecky.H. A. L. - 1938 - Journal of Philosophy 35 (14):388-388.
  49.  31
    Realism, Writing, Disfiguration: On Thomas Eakins and Stephen Crane.Michael Fried - 1989 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (4):398-398.
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    Stephen Winter, Transitional Justice in Established Democracies: A Political Theory: London, England: Palgrave MacMillan, 2014, 311 Pp. ISBN 978-0230285231 $105.00 Pb.Stephen Galoob - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (1):249-254.
    The fundamental question of political reparation is: why should a state provide redress for an injustice? The predominant answer justifies redress in terms of debts—the perpetration of an injustice creates a debt, and a state is required to make redress for the same reasons that it is required to repay its debts . Other approaches justify redress on the grounds that it will facilitate the achievement of some broader political goal, like the fair distribution of social resources or political reconciliation.In (...)
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