46 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Stephen C. Angle [47]Stephen Charles Angle [1]
See also
Stephen C. Angle
Wesleyan University
  1.  79
    Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy.Stephen C. Angle - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    The book's significance is two-fold: it argues for a new stage in the development of contemporary Confucian philosophy, and it demonstrates the value to Western ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  2.  74
    Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy: Toward Progressive Confucianism.Stephen C. Angle - 2012 - Polity.
    Confucian political philosophy has recently emerged as a vibrant area of thought both in China and around the globe. This book provides an accessible introduction to the main perspectives and topics being debated today, and shows why Progressive Confucianism is a particularly promising approach. Students of political theory or contemporary politics will learn that far from being confined to a museum, contemporary Confucianism is both responding to current challenges and offering insights from which we can all learn. The Progressive Confucianism (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  3. Human Rights in Chinese Thought: A Cross-Cultural Inquiry.Stephen C. Angle - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    What should we make of claims by members of other groups to have moralities different from our own? Human Rights in Chinese Thought gives an extended answer to this question in the first study of its kind. It integrates a full account of the development of Chinese rights discourse - reaching back to important, though neglected, origins of that discourse in 17th and 18th century Confucianism - with philosophical consideration of how various communities should respond to contemporary Chinese claims about (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  4.  63
    Decent Democratic Centralism.Stephen C. Angle - 2005 - Political Theory 33 (4):518-546.
    Are there any coherent and defensible alternatives to liberal democracy? The author examines the possibility that a reformed democratic centralism-the principle around which China's current polity is officially organized-might be legitimate, according to both an inside and an outside perspective. The inside perspective builds on contemporary Chinese political theory; the outside perspective critically deploys Rawls's notion ofa "decent society " as its standard. Along the way, the author pays particular attention to the kinds and degree of pluralism a decent society (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  5.  59
    No Supreme Principle: Confucianism’s Harmonization of Multiple Values.Stephen C. Angle - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):35-40.
  6. Ritual and Reverence in Ancient China and Today. [REVIEW]Stephen C. Angle - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (3):471-479.
  7.  10
    New Confucianism a Critical Examination.John Makeham & Stephen C. Angle - 2003
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  8.  65
    Must We Choose Our Leaders? Human Rights and Political Participation in China.Stephen C. Angle - 2005 - Journal of Global Ethics 1 (2):177 – 196.
    The essay begins from Alan Gewirth's influential account of human rights, and specifically with his argument that the human right to political participation can only be fulfilled by competitive, liberal democracy. I show that his argument rests on empirical, rather than conceptual grounds, which opens the possibility that in China, alternative forms of participation may be legitimate or even superior. An examination of the theory and contemporary practice of 'democratic centralism' shows that while it does not now adequately support the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  9.  4
    Moral Psychology: Heartmind (Xin), Nature (Xing), and Emotions (Qing).Stephen C. Angle & Justin Tiwald - 2020 - In Kai-Chiu Ng & Yong Huang (eds.), Dao Companion to Zhu Xi's Philosophy. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer. pp. 361-387.
    An overview of Zhu Xi's moral psychology, with a special focus on the metaphysical underpinnings and the relations between heartmind (xin), emotions (qing), and nature (xing). The authors explain how Zhu uses his account to balance the demand for independent standards of assessment with his commitment to ethical norms that virtuous agents can embrace wholeheartedly.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  8
    Kim, Sungmoon. Public Reason Confucianism: Democratic Perfectionism and Constitutionalism in East Asia.New York: Cambridge University Press, 2016. Pp. 276. $99.99. [REVIEW]Stephen C. Angle - 2017 - Ethics 127 (3):783-788.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  32
    Reply to Justin Tiwald.Stephen C. Angle - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):237-239.
  12.  81
    The Minimal Definition and Methodology of Comparative Philosophy: A Report From a Conference [Abstract].Stephen C. Angle - 2010 - Comparative Philosophy 1 (1):106.
    In June of 2008, the International Society for Comparative Studies of Chinese and Western Philosophy (ISCWP) convened its third Constructive Engagement conference, on the theme of “Comparative Philosophy Methodology.” During the opening speeches, Prof. Dunhua ZHAO, Chair of the Philosophy Department at Peking University, challenged the conference’s participants to put forward a minimal definition of “comparative philosophy” and a statement of its methods. Based on the papers from the conference and the extensive discussion that ensued, during my closing reflections at (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13. Concepts, Communication, and the Relevance of Philosophy to Human Rights: A Response to Randall Peerenboom.Stephen C. Angle - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (2):320-324.
  14. Should We All Be More English? Liang Qichao, Rudolf von Jhering, and Rights.Stephen C. Angle - 2000 - Journal of the History of Ideas 61 (2):241-261.
  15.  20
    The Adolescence of Mainland New Confucianism.Stephen C. Angle - 2018 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 49 (2):83-99.
    This issue of Contemporary Chinese Thought is devoted to recent mainland Chinese Confucian philosophizing, and especially to arguments about what “Mainland New Confucianism” signifies that were prompted by somewhat dismissive remarks about Mainland New Confucianism by the noted Taiwanese scholar Li Minghui in early 2015. This introduction begins by summarizing some of the challenges Confucianism has encountered in the twentieth century and also the rise of New Confucianism. It next turns to the emergence of Mainland New Confucianism as a distinct (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  37
    A Productive Dialogue: Contemporary Moral Education and Zhu XI's Neo‐Confucian Ethics.Stephen C. Angle - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (s1):183-203.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17.  54
    Sagely Ease and Moral Perception.Stephen C. Angle - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):31-55.
  18.  77
    Defining “Virtue Ethics” and Exploring Virtues in a Comparative Context.Stephen C. Angle - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (3):297-304.
  19.  26
    Guest Editors' Introduction: Rights and Chinese Thought.Stephen C. Angle - 1999 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 31 (1):3-10.
    The past decade has seen a vigorous discussion of human rights both within China and between China and other nations. It is easy to think of China as a latecomer to human rights discourse, in part because during most of the post-1949 period, rights and human rights were taboo subjects in the People's Republic. In fact, however, there was a rich and contested debate on rights throughout the first half of this century. By translating the most important pre-1949 essays on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  14
    Does Confucian Public Reason Depend on Confucian Civil Religion?Stephen C. Angle - 2019 - Journal of Social Philosophy 50 (2):177-191.
  21.  59
    Translating (and Interpreting) the Mengzi: Virtue, Obligation, and Discretion.Stephen C. Angle - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (4):676-683.
  22.  31
    Did Someone Say "Rights"? Liu Shipei's Concept of Quanli.Stephen C. Angle - 1998 - Philosophy East and West 48 (4):623-651.
    It is argued that "quanli" meant something different from the "rights" that it purports to translate in the writings of Liu Shipei (1884-1919). This does not mean that "quanli," as Liu used it, has no overlap with any of the meanings of "rights." But it can be argued that these overlaps are in a crucial sense coincidental, since the notion of "quanli" in Liu's major works represents a growth out of, rather than an imposition on, the Confucian tradition. In general, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  23.  40
    The Future of Confucian Political Philosophy.Stephen C. Angle - 2018 - Comparative Philosophy 9 (1).
    On February 14, 2017, Joseph Chan and Stephen Angle convened a Roundtable on the Future of Confucian Political Philosophy at the University of Hong Kong. Eight invited speakers each offered thoughts on the main topic, followed by discussion among the panelists and responses to questions from the audience. This transcript has been reviewed and edited by the main participants. Much of the discussion revolves around the relations and tensions between Confucian political philosophy as academic theory-construction and the lived realities of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  10
    Sages and Self-Restriction: A Response to Joseph Chan.Stephen C. Angle - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (3):795-798.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Chinese Human Rights Reader.Stephen C. Angle & Marina Svensson (eds.) - 2001 - M. E. Sharpe.
    Translations of Chinese writing on human rights from throughout the twentieth century, with introductions.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  21
    A Response to Thorian Harris.Stephen C. Angle - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (3):397-400.
  27.  72
    A Fresh Look at Knowledge and Action: Wang Yangming in Comparative Perspective.Stephen C. Angle - 2006 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (2):287–298.
  28.  73
    New Confucianism: A Critical Examination, Edited by John Makeham. [REVIEW]Stephen C. Angle - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (4):535–540.
    This collection of essays explores the development of the New Confucianism movement during the 20th century and questions whether it is, in fact, a distinctly new intellectual movement or one that has been mostly retrospectively created. The questions that contributors to this book seek to answer about this neo-conservative philosophical movement include: “What has been the cross-fertilization between Chinese scholars in China and overseas made possible by the shared discourse of Confucianism?” “To what extent does this discourse transcend geographical, political, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  33
    Review of Manufacturing Confucianism: Chinese Traditions and Universal Civilization by Lionel M. Jensen. [REVIEW]Stephen C. Angle - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (1):120-122.
  30.  11
    WANG Yangming as a Virtue Ethicist.Stephen C. Angle - 2010 - In John Makeham (ed.), Dao Companion to Neo-Confucian Philosophy. Springer. pp. 315--335.
  31.  33
    Varieties of Ethical Reflection: New Directions for Ethics in a Global Context.Stephen C. Angle, Michael Barnhart, Carl B. Becker, Purushottama Bilimoria, Samuel Fleischacker, Alan Fox, Damien Keown, Russell Kirkland, David R. Loy, Mara Miller & Kirill Ole Thompson (eds.) - 2002 - Lexington Books.
    Varieties of Ethical Reflection brings together new cultural and religious perspectives—drawn from non-Western, primarily Asian, philosophical sources—to globalize the contemporary discussion of theoretical and applied ethics.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  29
    'Dao' as a Nickname.Stephen C. Angle & John A. Gordon - 2003 - Asian Philosophy 13 (1):15 – 27.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  9
    Confucius.Stephen C. Angle - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollete (ed.), International Encyclopedia of Ethics. John Wiley & Sons.
    Confucius (551–479 BCE) is the Latinized name of Kong Qiu, best known in Chinese as Kongzi (Master Kong). Only partially successful in his public career, Confucius' private teaching inaugurated an era of reflectiveness and helped to define core elements of Chinese civilization. Subsequent generations of students built on his initial formulations to develop one of the world's great philosophical traditions, which in English we call “Confucianism”; various terms are used in Chinese, including Ru jia (the Scholars' School) and Dao xue (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  6
    A Fresh Look at Knowledge and Action: Wang Yangming in Comparative Perspective.Stephen C. Angle - 2005 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (2):287-298.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  61
    Fan, Ruiping, Reconstructionist Confucianism: Rethinking Morality After the West: Dordrecht: Springer, 2010, Xx + 296 Pages. [REVIEW]Stephen C. Angle - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):353-357.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  56
    Review of Kam-Por Yu, Julia Tao, Philip J. Ivanhoe (Eds.), Taking Confucian Ethics Seriously: ContemPorary Theories and Applications[REVIEW]Stephen C. Angle - 2011 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (2).
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  35
    A Confucian Constitutional Order: How China's Ancient Past Can Shape Its Political Future by Jiang Qing, Translated by Edmund Ryden, Edited by Daniel A. Bell and Ruiping Fan (Review).Stephen C. Angle - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (2):502-506.
    How important is Jiang Qing, whose extraordinary proposals for political change make up the core of the new book A Confucian Constitutional Order: How China’s Ancient Past Can Shape Its Political Future? In his Introduction to the volume, co-editor Daniel Bell maintains that Jiang’s views are “intensely controversial” and that conversations about political reform in China rarely fail to turn to Jiang’s proposals. At least in my experience, this is something of an exaggeration. Chinese political thinking today is highly pluralistic, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  61
    Review of kWong-Loi Shun, David B. Wong (Eds.), Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community[REVIEW]Stephen C. Angle - 2005 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (12).
  39.  38
    Reply to Critics.Stephen C. Angle - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (3):381-388.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  38
    Fred Dallmayr and Zhao Tingyang, Eds. Contemporary Chinese Political Thought: Debates and Perspectives: Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky, 2012. Viii + 295. [REVIEW]Stephen C. Angle - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (1):111-115.
  41.  44
    The Possibility of Sagehood:Reverence and Ethical Perfection in Zhu XI's Thought.Stephen C. Angle - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (3):281-303.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  40
    The Discovery of Chinese Logic. [REVIEW]Stephen C. Angle - 2012 - History and Philosophy of Logic 33 (3):293-296.
    History and Philosophy of Logic, Volume 33, Issue 3, Page 293-296, August 2012.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  15
    Confucian Justification of Limited Government: Comments on Joseph Chan's Confucian Perfectionism.Stephen C. Angle - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):15-24.
    I approach this encounter with Joseph Chan’s important work on Confucian perfectionism from a fundamentally sympathetic standpoint. Most basically, I agree with two of his key premises. Confucianism is more than a rich historical tradition: it is a live strand of political theory, able to criticize and contribute to our lives today. But for modern Confucianism to be plausible and attractive, it must find a way to embrace the idea of limited government or constitutionalism in a deeper fashion than it (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  41
    A Reply to Fan Ruiping.Stephen C. Angle - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):463-464.
    A Reply to F an Ruiping Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11712-010-9189-7 Authors Stephen C. Angle, Department of Philosophy, Wesleyan University, 350 High Street, Middletown, CT 06459, USA Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  29
    Review of William M. Sullivan, Will Kymlicka (Eds.), The Globalization of Ethics: Religious and Secular Perspectives[REVIEW]Stephen C. Angle - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (3).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Neo-Confucianism: A Philosophical Introduction.Stephen C. Angle & Justin Tiwald - 2017 - Cambridge, UK: Polity.
    Neo-Confucianism is a philosophically sophisticated tradition weaving classical Confucianism together with themes from Buddhism and Daoism. It began in China around the eleventh century CE, played a leading role in East Asian cultures over the last millennium, and has had a profound influence on modern Chinese society. -/- Based on the latest scholarship but presented in accessible language, Neo-Confucianism: A Philosophical Introduction is organized around themes that are central in Neo-Confucian philosophy, including the structure of the cosmos, human nature, ways (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark