Results for 'Stephen Fenner'

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  1.  25
    Bounded Immunity and Btt‐Reductions.Stephen Fenner & Marcus Schaefer - 1999 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 45 (1):3-21.
    We define and study a new notion called k-immunity that lies between immunity and hyperimmunity in strength. Our interest in k-immunity is justified by the result that θ does not k-tt reduce to a k-immune set, which improves a previous result by Kobzev [7]. We apply the result to show that Φ′ does not btt-reduce to MIN, the set of minimal programs. Other applications include the set of Kolmogorov random strings, and retraceable and regressive sets. We also give a new (...)
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  2.  76
    Almost weakly 2-generic sets.Stephen A. Fenner - 1994 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 59 (3):868-887.
    There is a family of questions in relativized complexity theory--weak analogs of the Friedberg Jump-Inversion Theorem--that are resolved by 1-generic sets but which cannot be resolved by essentially any weaker notion of genericity. This paper defines aw2-generic sets. i.e., sets which meet every dense set of strings that is r.e. in some incomplete r.e. set. Aw2-generic sets are very close to 1-generic sets in strength, but are too weak to resolve these questions. In particular, it is shown that for any (...)
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  3.  15
    The complexity of learning SUBSEQ(A).Stephen Fenner, William Gasarch & Brian Postow - 2009 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 74 (3):939-975.
    Higman essentially showed that if A is any language then SUBSEQ(A) is regular, where SUBSEQ(A) is the language of all subsequences of strings in A. Let s1, s2, s3, . . . be the standard lexicographic enumeration of all strings over some finite alphabet. We consider the following inductive inference problem: given A(s1), A(s2), A(s3), . . . . learn, in the limit, a DFA for SUBSEQU). We consider this model of learning and the variants of it that are usually (...)
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  4. Does Ontology Rest on a Mistake?Stephen Yablo - 1998 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):229 - 283.
    [Stephen Yablo] The usual charge against Carnap's internal/external distinction is one of 'guilt by association with analytic/synthetic'. But it can be freed of this association, to become the distinction between statements made within make-believe games and those made outside them-or, rather, a special case of it with some claim to be called the metaphorical/literal distinction. Not even Quine considers figurative speech committal, so this turns the tables somewhat. To determine our ontological commitments, we have to ferret out all traces (...)
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  5.  32
    The Concept of Extinction: Epistemology, Responsibility, and Precaution.Fenner Stanley Tanswell - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (2):205-226.
    Extinction is a concept of rapidly growing importance, with the world currently in the sixth mass extinction event and a biodiversity crisis. However, the concept of extinction has itself received surprisingly little attention from philosophers. I will first argue that in practice there is no single unified concept of extinction, but instead that its usage divides between descriptive, epistemic, and declarative concepts. I will then consider the epistemic challenges that arise in ascertaining whether a species has gone extinct, and how (...)
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  6. The myth of the seven.Stephen Yablo - 2005 - In Mark Eli Kalderon (ed.), Fictionalism in Metaphysics. Clarendon Press. pp. 88--115.
  7.  39
    Objects are individuals but stuff doesn't count: perceived rigidity and cohesiveness influence infants' representations of small groups of discrete entities.Gavin Huntley-Fenner, Susan Carey & Andrea Solimando - 2002 - Cognition 85 (3):203-221.
  8.  8
    Fenner Brockway on Russell's Unpublished Letter [correction: Published Letter].Fenner Brockway - 2014 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 6.
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  9.  11
    Fenner Brockway on Russell's Unpublished Letter [correction: Published Letter].Fenner Brockway - 1986 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 6.
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  10. Conceptual engineering for mathematical concepts.Fenner Stanley Tanswell - 2018 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 61 (8):881-913.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper I investigate how conceptual engineering applies to mathematical concepts in particular. I begin with a discussion of Waismann’s notion of open texture, and compare it to Shapiro’s modern usage of the term. Next I set out the position taken by Lakatos which sees mathematical concepts as dynamic and open to improvement and development, arguing that Waismann’s open texture applies to mathematical concepts too. With the perspective of mathematics as open-textured, I make the case that this allows us (...)
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  11. A Problem with the Dependence of Informal Proofs on Formal Proofs.Fenner Tanswell - 2015 - Philosophia Mathematica 23 (3):295-310.
    Derivationists, those wishing to explain the correctness and rigour of informal proofs in terms of associated formal proofs, are generally held to be supported by the success of the project of translating informal proofs into computer-checkable formal counterparts. I argue, however, that this project is a false friend for the derivationists because there are too many different associated formal proofs for each informal proof, leading to a serious worry of overgeneration. I press this worry primarily against Azzouni's derivation-indicator account, but (...)
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  12.  16
    Children's understanding of number is similar to adults' and rats': numerical estimation by 5–7-year-olds.Gavin Huntley-Fenner - 2001 - Cognition 78 (3):27-40.
    Adult number representations can belong to either of two types. One is discrete, language-specific, and culturally-derived; the other is analog and language-independent. Quantitative evidence is presented to demonstrate that analog number representations are adult-like in young children. Five- to 7-year-olds accurately estimated rapidly presented groups of 5--11 items. Groups were presented in random order and random arrangements controlling for overall area. Children's data were qualitatively, and to some degree quantitatively, similar to adult data with one exception: the ratio of the (...)
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  13.  53
    Mathematical practice and epistemic virtue and vice.Fenner Stanley Tanswell & Ian James Kidd - 2020 - Synthese 199 (1-2):407-426.
    What sorts of epistemic virtues are required for effective mathematical practice? Should these be virtues of individual or collective agents? What sorts of corresponding epistemic vices might interfere with mathematical practice? How do these virtues and vices of mathematics relate to the virtue-theoretic terminology used by philosophers? We engage in these foundational questions, and explore how the richness of mathematical practices is enhanced by thinking in terms of virtues and vices, and how the philosophical picture is challenged by the complexity (...)
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  14.  70
    Proof, rigour and informality : a virtue account of mathematical knowledge.Fenner Stanley Tanswell - 2016 - St Andrews Research Repository Philosophy Dissertations.
    This thesis is about the nature of proofs in mathematics as it is practiced, contrasting the informal proofs found in practice with formal proofs in formal systems. In the first chapter I present a new argument against the Formalist-Reductionist view that informal proofs are justified as rigorous and correct by corresponding to formal counterparts. The second chapter builds on this to reject arguments from Gödel's paradox and incompleteness theorems to the claim that mathematics is inherently inconsistent, basing my objections on (...)
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  15. Epistemic injustice in mathematics.Colin Jakob Rittberg, Fenner Stanley Tanswell & Jean Paul Van Bendegem - 2020 - Synthese 197 (9):3875-3904.
    We investigate how epistemic injustice can manifest itself in mathematical practices. We do this as both a social epistemological and virtue-theoretic investigation of mathematical practices. We delineate the concept both positively—we show that a certain type of folk theorem can be a source of epistemic injustice in mathematics—and negatively by exploring cases where the obstacles to participation in a mathematical practice do not amount to epistemic injustice. Having explored what epistemic injustice in mathematics can amount to, we use the concept (...)
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  16.  53
    Property dualism, phenomenal concepts, and the semantic premise.Stephen L. White - 2006 - In Torin Andrew Alter & Sven Walter (eds.), Phenomenal Concepts and Phenomenal Knowledge: New Essays on Consciousness and Physicalism. Oxford University Press. pp. 210-248.
    This chapter defends the property dualism argument. The term “semantic premise” mentioned is used to refers to an assumption identified by Brian Loar that antiphysicalist arguments, such as the property dualism argument, tacitly assume that a statement of property identity that links conceptually independent concepts is true only if at least one concept picks out the property it refers to by connoting a contingent property of that property. It is argued that, the property that does the work in explaining the (...)
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  17.  87
    Political theory and postmodernism.Stephen K. White - 1991 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Postmodernism has evoked great controversy and it continues to do so today, as it disseminates into general discourse. Some see its principles, such as its fundamental resistance to metanarratives, as frighteningly disruptive, while a growing number are reaping the benefits of its innovative perspective. In Political Theory and Postmodernism, Stephen K. White outlines a path through the postmodern problematic by distinguishing two distinct ways of thinking about the meaning of responsibility, one prevalent in modern and the other in postmodern (...)
  18. A Priority and Existence.Stephen Yablo - 2000 - In Paul Artin Boghossian & Christopher Peacocke (eds.), New Essays on the A Priori. Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press. pp. 197--228.
  19.  36
    Saving Proof from Paradox: Gödel’s Paradox and the Inconsistency of Informal Mathematics.Fenner Stanley Tanswell - 2016 - In Peter Verdée & Holger Andreas (eds.), Logical Studies of Paraconsistent Reasoning in Science and Mathematics. Cham, Switzerland: Springer Verlag. pp. 159-173.
    In this paper I shall consider two related avenues of argument that have been used to make the case for the inconsistency of mathematics: firstly, Gödel’s paradox which leads to a contradiction within mathematics and, secondly, the incompatibility of completeness and consistency established by Gödel’s incompleteness theorems. By bringing in considerations from the philosophy of mathematical practice on informal proofs, I suggest that we should add to the two axes of completeness and consistency a third axis of formality and informality. (...)
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  20. Group Knowledge and Mathematical Collaboration: A Philosophical Examination of the Classification of Finite Simple Groups.Joshua Habgood-Coote & Fenner Stanley Tanswell - 2023 - Episteme 20 (2):281-307.
    In this paper we apply social epistemology to mathematical proofs and their role in mathematical knowledge. The most famous modern collaborative mathematical proof effort is the Classification of Finite Simple Groups. The history and sociology of this proof have been well-documented by Alma Steingart (2012), who highlights a number of surprising and unusual features of this collaborative endeavour that set it apart from smaller-scale pieces of mathematics. These features raise a number of interesting philosophical issues, but have received very little (...)
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  21. No Fool's Cold: Notes on Illusions of Possibility.Stephen Yablo - 2009 - In Oup (ed.), Thoughts. Oxford University Press.
  22. Pragmatism and Binding.Stephen Neale - 2004 - In Zoltán Gendler Szabó (ed.), Semantics Versus Pragmatics. Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press UK. pp. 165-285.
    Names, descriptions, and demonstratives raise well-known logical, ontological, and epistemological problems. Perhaps less well known, amongst philosophers at least, are the ways in which some of these problems not only recur with pronouns but also cross-cut further problems exposed by the study in generative linguistics of morpho-syntactic constraints on interpretation. These problems will be my primary concern here, but I want to address them within a general picture of interpretation that is required if wires are not to be crossed. That (...)
     
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  23.  16
    Environmental Aesthetics and the Dynamic Object.David E. W. Fenner - 2006 - Ethics and the Environment 11 (1):1-20.
    In this paper, I lay out a case for why those objects of aesthetic attention which are principally characterized as natural objects should be understood not statically, as existing in merely a three-dimensional fixed state, but as dynamic, as existing in a space-time context, complete with change, movement, and flux. After this, I explain why this is important, how the dynamic nature of natural objects raises a concern for aesthetically evaluating natural objects, and how that concern may be addressed.
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  24. Experimental Philosophy and the Philosophical Tradition.Stephen Stich & Kevin P. Tobia - 2016 - In Wesley Buckwalter & Justin Sytsma (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Malden, MA: Blackwell. pp. 5.
  25.  63
    Action and Production.Stephen White - 2022 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 22 (2):271-294.
  26. Superproportionality and mind-body relations.Stephen Yablo - 2001 - Theoria 16 (40):65-75.
    Mental causes are threatened from two directions: from below, since they would appear to be screened off by lower-order, e.g., neural states; and from within, since they would also appear to be screened off by intrinsic, e.g., syntactical states. A principle needed to parry the first threat -causes should be proportional to their effects- appears to leave us open to the second; for why should unneeded extrinsic detail be any less offensive to proportionality than excess microstructure? I say that the (...)
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  27. Aesthetic experience and aesthetic analysis.David E. W. Fenner - 2003 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 37 (1):40-53.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Journal of Aesthetic Education 37.1 (2003) 40-53 [Access article in PDF] Aesthetic Experience and Aesthetic Analysis David E. W. Fenner The "raw data" that aesthetics is meant to explain is the aesthetic experience. People have experiences that they class off from other experiences and label, as a class, the aesthetic ones. Aesthetic experience is basic, and allother things aesthetic — aesthetic properties, aesthetic objects, aesthetic attitudes — (...)
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  28. The moral status of animals.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1977 - New York: Oxford University Press.
  29.  17
    Aesthetic Experience and Aesthetic Analysis.David E. W. Fenner - 2003 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 37 (1):40.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Journal of Aesthetic Education 37.1 (2003) 40-53 [Access article in PDF] Aesthetic Experience and Aesthetic Analysis David E. W. Fenner The "raw data" that aesthetics is meant to explain is the aesthetic experience. People have experiences that they class off from other experiences and label, as a class, the aesthetic ones. Aesthetic experience is basic, and allother things aesthetic — aesthetic properties, aesthetic objects, aesthetic attitudes — (...)
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  30.  44
    Environmental aesthetics and the dynamic object.David E. W. Fenner - 2006 - Ethics and the Environment 11 (1):1-19.
    : In this paper, I lay out a case for why those objects of aesthetic attention which are principally characterized as natural objects should be understood not statically, as existing in merely a three-dimensional fixed state, but as dynamic, as existing in a space-time context, complete with change, movement, and flux. After this, I explain why this is important, how the dynamic nature of natural objects raises a concern for aesthetically evaluating natural objects, and how that concern may be addressed.
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  31. The adventures of the narrative.Stephen H. Watson - 1988 - In Hugh J. Silverman (ed.), Philosophy and Non-Philosophy Since Merleau-Ponty. Routledge.
     
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  32. The very idea of a critical social science: a pragmatist turn.Stephen K. White - 2004 - In Fred Rush (ed.), The Cambridge companion to critical theory. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 310-335.
     
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  33. Permission and (So-Called Epistemic) Possibility.Stephen Yablo - 2010 - In Bob Hale & Aviv Hoffmann (eds.), Modality: metaphysics, logic, and epistemology. Oxford University Press.
  34.  3
    The Language of Proofs: A Philosophical Corpus Linguistics Study of Instructions and Imperatives in Mathematical Texts.Fenner Stanley Tanswell & Matthew Inglis - 2024 - In Bharath Sriraman (ed.), Handbook of the History and Philosophy of Mathematical Practice. Cham: Springer. pp. 2925-2952.
    A common description of a mathematical proof is as a logically structured sequence of assertions, beginning from accepted premises and proceeding by standard inference rules to a conclusion. Does this description match the language of proofs as mathematicians write them in their research articles? In this chapter, we use methods from corpus linguistics to look at the prevalence of imperatives and instructions in mathematical preprints from the arXiv repository. We find thirteen verbs that are used most often to form imperatives (...)
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  35.  13
    A concise history of mathematics, but not for philosophers: John Stillwell: A concise history of mathematics for philosophers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019. 69pp, £15.Fenner Stanley Tanswell - 2020 - Metascience 29 (3):519-521.
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  36.  5
    Playing with LEGO® and Proving Theorems.Fenner Tanswell - 2017-07-26 - In William Irwin & Roy T. Cook (eds.), LEGO® and Philosophy. Wiley. pp. 217–226.
    LEGO and math are both about what one do with the objects. In LEGO, he/she can build sets following the instructions, or alternatively dump a whole bunch of LEGO on the floor and build whatever he/she like. In math, he/she have a similar freedom to create new things, solve problems, and play around. Geometry makes far greater use of pictures and diagrams than tends to be the case for other areas of mathematics. This chapter focuses on diagrammatic proofs as a (...)
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  37.  19
    Experiencing a Garden.David Fenner - 2024 - Environmental Philosophy 21 (1):91-107.
    This paper identifies and discusses eight perspectives one can take toward preparing to experience a garden, experiencing it, and then reflecting on that experience. The paper does not argue that one is better than another but rather explores the options, encouraging the garden visitor to adopt a plurality as means to enhance their appreciation of gardens.
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  38.  20
    Global media ethics: problems and perspectives.Stephen J. A. Ward (ed.) - 2013 - Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
    Global Media Ethics is the first comprehensive cross-cultural exploration of the conceptual and practical issues facing media ethics in a global world. A team of leading journalism experts investigate the impact of major global trends on responsible journalism. The first full-length, truly global textbook on media ethics; Explores how current global changes in media promote and inhibit responsible journalism; Includes relevant and timely ethical discussions based on major trends in journalism and global media; Questions existing frameworks in media ethics in (...)
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  39. Leibniz on Concepts and Their Relation to the Senses (Leibniz über Begriffe und ihr Verhältnis zu den Sinnen).Stephen Puryear - 2008 - In Dominik Perler & Markus Wild (eds.), Sehen und Begreifen. Wahrnehmungstheorien in der Frühen Neuzeit. Berlin, Deutschland: de Gruyter. pp. 235-264.
    Despite holding that all concepts are strictly speaking innate, Leibniz attempts to accommodate the common belief that at least some concepts are adventitious by appealing to his theory of ideal action. The essential idea is that an innate concept can be considered adventitious, in a sense, just in case its ideal cause is to be found outside the mind of the one who possesses the concept. I explore this attempt at accommodation and argue that it fails. [See external link for (...)
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  40.  26
    Firm size, organizational visibility and corporate philanthropy: an empirical analysis.Stephen Brammer & Andrew Millington - 2005 - Business Ethics 15 (1):6-18.
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  41.  80
    Aquinas and Sartre: on freedom, personal identity, and the possibility of happiness.Stephen Wang - 2009 - Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press.
    Historical introduction -- Human being -- Identity and human incompletion in Sartre -- Identity and human incompletion in Aquinas -- Human understanding -- The subjective nature of objective understanding in Sartre -- The subjective nature of objective understanding in Aquinas -- Human freedom -- Freedom, choice, and the indetermination of reason in Sartre -- Freedom, choice, and the indetermination of reason in Aquinas -- Human fulfillment -- The possibility of human happiness in Sartre -- The possibility of human happiness in (...)
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  42. Essence, Experiment, and Underdetermination in the Spinoza-Boyle Correspondence.Stephen Harrop - 2022 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 12 (2):447-484.
    I examine the (mediated) correspondence between Spinoza and Robert Boyle concerning the latter’s account of fluidity and his experiments on reconstitution of niter in the light of the epistemology and doctrine of method contained in the Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect. I argue that both the Treatise and the correspondence reveal that for Spinoza, the proper method of science is not experimental, and that he accepted a powerful under-determination thesis. I argue that, in contrast to modern versions, Spinoza’s (...)
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  43. Abysses.Stephen H. Watson - 1985 - In Hugh J. Silverman & Don Ihde (eds.), Hermeneutics & deconstruction. Albany: State University of New York Press. pp. 235--236.
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  44. A Defense of Transcendental Arguments.Stephen L. White - 2022 - In Stephen Hetherington & David Macarthur (eds.), Living Skepticism. Essays in Epistemology and Beyond. Boston: BRILL.
     
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  45. Phenomenology and the normativity of practical reason.Stephen L. White - 2010 - In Mario De Caro & David Macarthur (eds.), Naturalism and Normativity. Cambridge University Press. pp. 205-228.
     
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  46.  5
    A History of the Criminal Law of England.James Fitzjames Stephen - 1996 - Routledge.
    As a practising lawyer and judge, it is the insights gained from Stephen's own experience that give an added practical dimension to this work. As well as his accounts of the history of the branches of the law, Stephen gives several fascinating analyses of famous trials, and explores the relation of madness to crime and the relation of law to ethics, physiology, and mental philosophy. His discussion also includes the subjects of criminal responsibility, offences against the state, the (...)
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  47.  54
    Philosophical perspectives on art.Stephen Davies - 2007 - New York;: Oxford University Press.
    Philosophical Perspectives on Art presents a series of essays devoted to two of the most fundamental topics in the philosophy of art: the distinctive character of artworks and what is involved in understanding them as art. In Part I, Stephen Davies considers a wide range of questions about the nature and definition of art. Can art be defined, and if so, which definitions are the most plausible? Do we make and consume art because there are evolutionary advantages to doing (...)
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  48.  16
    Operant performance of rats selectively bred for strong or weak acquisition of conditioned taste aversions.Stephen H. Hobbs & Ralph L. Elkins - 1983 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 21 (4):303-306.
  49.  7
    Informed consent: patient autonomy and physician beneficence within clinical medicine.Stephen Wear - 1993 - Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Substantial efforts have recently been made to reform the physician-patient relationship, particularly toward replacing the `silent world of doctor and patient' with informed patient participation in medical decision-making. This 'new ethos of patient autonomy' has especially insisted on the routine provision of informed consent for all medical interventions. Stronly supported by most bioethicists and the law, as well as more popular writings and expectations, it still seems clear that informed consent has, at best, been received in a lukewarm fashion by (...)
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  50.  75
    What is political theory?Stephen K. White & J. Donald Moon (eds.) - 2004 - Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications.
    What Is Political Theory? provides students with a comprehensive overview of the current state of the discipline. Ten substantive chapters address the most pressing topics in political theory today, including: - what resources do the classic texts still provide for political theorists? - what areas will political theorists focus on in the future? - can western political theory alone continue to provide a framework for responding to the challenges of modern political life? The authors assess the intellectual challenges to conventional (...)
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