4 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Stephen Galoob [3]Stephen R. Galoob [1]
  1.  6
    Coercion, Fraud, and What is Wrong with Blackmail.Stephen Galoob - forthcoming - Legal Theory:1-37.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  20
    How Do Roles Generate Reasons? A Method of Legal Ethics.Stephen Galoob - 2012 - Legal Ethics 15 (1):1-28.
    Philosophical discussions of legal ethics should be oriented around the generative problem , which asks two fundamental questions. First, how does the lawyer's role generate reasons? Second, what kinds of reasons can this role generate? Every extant theory of legal ethics is based on a solution to the generative problem. On the generative method , theories of legal ethics are evaluated based on the plausibility of these solutions. I apply this method to three prominent theories of legal ethics, finding that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  9
    Stephen Winter, Transitional Justice in Established Democracies: A Political Theory.Stephen Galoob - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (1):249-254.
    The fundamental question of political reparation is: why should a state provide redress for an injustice? The predominant answer justifies redress in terms of debts—the perpetration of an injustice creates a debt, and a state is required to make redress for the same reasons that it is required to repay its debts . Other approaches justify redress on the grounds that it will facilitate the achievement of some broader political goal, like the fair distribution of social resources or political reconciliation.In (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  5
    Intentions, Compliance, and Fiduciary Obligations.Stephen R. Galoob & Leib - 2014 - Legal Theory 20 (2):106-132.
    This essay investigates the structure of fiduciary obligations, specifically the obligation of loyalty. Fiduciary obligations differ from promissory obligations with respect to the possibility of Promissory obligations can be satisfied through behavior that conforms to a promise, even if that behavior is done for inappropriate reasons. By contrast, fiduciary loyalty necessarily has an intentional dimension, one that prevents satisfaction through accidental compliance. The intentional dimension of fiduciary loyalty is best described by what we call the account. This account both explains (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography