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  1.  4
    Erwin Straus: Suggestion and Hypnosis.Stephen J. Rojcewicz & James A. Beshai - 2018 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 49 (2):197-213.
    Despite his major contributions to phenomenology, the writings on suggestion and hypnosis by Erwin Straus have been underappreciated. In his German language publications of 1925 and 1927, Straus argues that we cannot elucidate the phenomenon of suggestion solely or even primarily through experimental design, a narrow natural scientific viewpoint, or an emphasis on abnormal or special states of dissociation. In contrast, a phenomenological study that begins with everyday experience demonstrates that suggestion is part of normal experience, and its understanding must (...)
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    The "Human" Voices in Hallucinations.Richard Rojcewicz & Stephen J. Rojcewicz - 1997 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 28 (1):1-41.
    Schizophrenic hallucinations can be understood only as a function of the totality of the schizophrenic's personality, that is, only in the context of the person's entire being-in-the-world. For essential reasons, there is a predominance of auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia, and these typically take the form of human voices. This paper argues that the essential reasons here are human reasons. That is, hallucinations arise primarily on account of a human or personal deficit. We argue that the deficit in question is, most (...)
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    Brill Online Books and Journals.Stephen J. Rojcewicz & Richard Rojcewicz - 1997 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 28 (1):1-41.
    Schizophrenic hallucinations can be understood only as a function of the totality of the schizophrenic's personality, that is, only in the context of the person's entire being-in-the-world. For essential reasons, there is a predominance of auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia, and these typically take the form of human voices. This paper argues that the essential reasons here are human reasons. That is, hallucinations arise primarily on account of a human or personal deficit. We argue that the deficit in question is, most (...)
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