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  1. Thought Experiments and Personal Identity.Stephen R. Coleman - 2000 - Philosophical Studies 98 (1):51-66.
    Thought experiments are profitably compared to compasses. A compass is a simple but useful device for determining direction. Nevertheless, it systematically errs in the presence of magnets ...it becomes unreliable near the North Pole, in mine shafts, when vibrated, in the presence of metal ...experts will wish to use the compass as one element in a wider portfolio of navigational techniques. Analogously, thought experiments are simple but useful devices for determining the status of propositions. Sadly, they systematically err under certain (...)
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  2. Historical Context and Systematic Functions of the Concept of the Operant.Stephen R. Coleman - 1981 - Behaviorism 9 (2):207-226.
     
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  3. The Problem of Volition and the Conditioned Reflex. Part I: Conceptual Background, 1900-1940.Stephen R. Coleman - 1985 - Behaviorism 13 (2):99-124.
    From its earliest beginnings, American conditioning research using human subjects had to deal with the possibility that subjects might voluntarily control the reaction that the experimenter attempts to condition, with the result that voluntary control contaminates the study of conditioning in humans. A preliminary solution to the problem was achieved around 1940, ending the time frame of this survey. This article provides an historical survey of the conceptual background of the opposition of volition and reflexes; describes manifestations of the problem (...)
     
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  4. The Problem of Volition and the Conditioned Reflex Part 1: Conceptual Background, 1900-1940.Stephen R. Coleman - 1985 - Behavior and Philosophy 13 (2):99.
     
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