Results for 'Stephen R. Napier'

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  1.  11
    Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Joseph A. Bulbulia, Kristen Kingfield Kearns, Ilsup Ahn, Peter Forrest, Stephen R. Napier, Graeme Marshall & Patrick Hutchings - 2003 - Sophia 42 (1):125-126.
    Book Review. . ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/00048402.2014.929720.
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  2. Motivated Cognition in Perception, Memory and Testimony: In Defense of a Responsibilist Version of Virtue Epistemology.Stephen R. Napier - 2004 - Dissertation, Saint Louis University
    There is debate among virtue epistemologists concerning what is the nature of an intellectual virtue. Linda Zagzebski in Virtues of the Mind , for instance, argues that an intellectual virtue has both a success and motivational component. Furthermore, Zagzebski defines knowledge with reference to acts of intellectual virtue. An agent S knows p iff S performs an act of intellectual virtue in forming the belief that p. This means that Zagzebski is committed to the counter-intuitive claim that low-grade knowledge requires (...)
     
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  3. Lectures and Essays by the Late William Kingdon Clifford, F.R.S.William Kingdon Clifford, Leslie Stephen & Frederick Pollock - 1918 - Watts & Co.
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  4. Sins of the Missionaries: Evangelism's Quest to Conquer the World.R. Welch Stephen - 2004 - Free Inquiry 24 (2):24.
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  5.  25
    The Dead Donor Rule and Means-End Reasoning.Stephen Napier - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (01):134-140.
  6.  2
    Why Are Religious Reasons Dismissed? Euthanasia, Basic Goods, and Gratuitous Evil.Stephen Napier - 2016 - Christian Bioethics 22 (3):276-300.
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  7.  2
    The Dead Donor Rule and Means-End Reasoning - A Reply to Gardiner and Sparrow.Stephen Napier - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (1):134-140.
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  8.  21
    Twinning, Substance, and Identity Through Time: A Reply to McMahan.Stephen Napier - 2008 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 8 (2):255-264.
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  9.  10
    Out of the Frying Pan and Into the Fire.Stephen Napier - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):60-61.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 8, Page 60-61, August 2011.
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  10.  13
    Vulnerable Embryos.Stephen Napier - 2010 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4):781-810.
    Contemporary philosophical discussion on human embryonic stem cell research has focused primarily on the metaphysical and meta-ethical issues suchresearch raises. Though these discussions are interesting, largely ignored are arguments rooted in the secular research ethics tradition already informing humansubject research. This tradition countenances the notion of vulnerability and that vulnerable human subjects (of which human embryos are likely members)ought to be protected from research-related harms. This is the basic idea behind the argument from vulnerability, and it enjoys prima facie plausibility. (...)
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  11.  49
    Challenging Research on Human Subjects: Justice and Uncompensated Harms.Stephen Napier - 2013 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (1):29-51.
    Ethical challenges to certain aspects of research on human subjects are not uncommon; examples include challenges to first-in-human trials (Chapman in J Clin Res Bioethics 2(4):1–8, 2011), certain placebo controlled trials (Anderson in J Med Philos 31:65–81, 2006; Anderson and Kimmelman in Kennedy Inst Ethics J 20(1):75–98, 2010) and “sham” surgery (Macklin in N Engl J Med 341:992–996, 1999). To date, however, there are few challenges to research when the subjects are competent and the research is more than minimal risk (...)
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  12.  8
    Belmont Revisited: Ethical Principles for Research with Human Subjects, Edited by James F. Childress, Eric M. Meslin, and Harold T. Shapiro. [REVIEW]Stephen Napier - 2007 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 7 (4):838-841.
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  13.  29
    Brain Death, Souls, and Integrated Functioning: Reply to Verheijde and Potts.Stephen Napier - 2013 - Christian Bioethics 19 (1):25-39.
    Recently, Verheijde and Potts (2011) have called into question the whole-brain death (WBD) criterion and, in particular, have taken issue with my admittedly limited defense of WBD. I would like to thank Verheijde and Potts for their comments and for identifying key points in the debate that need further clarification and defense. This article is an attempt to provide such clarification and to focus on Verheijde and Potts’s key argument against me and other proponents of WBD. The structure of this (...)
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  14.  28
    Native American Archaeology and Culture: A Selected Bibliography I. General Reference.Margaret R. Bunsen, M. Stephen, James W. Cambron, C. Hulse David, Michael Coe, Dean Snow, Elizabeth Benson, Samd Gill, F. Sullivan Irene & Arlene Hirschfelder - forthcoming - Clio.
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  15.  13
    St. Ambrose, Euthanasia, and Antisenescence Arguments.Stephen Napier - 2014 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 17 (2):39-57.
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  16.  5
    Thought Experiments, the Reliability of Intuitions, and Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Stephen Napier - 2016 - International Philosophical Quarterly 56 (1):77-98.
    It is common in bioethical discussion to present thought experiments or cases in order to construct an argument. Some thought experiments are quite illuminating, and ethical theorizing will often appeal at some point to one’s intuitions. But there are cases in which thought experiments are useless or do not contribute to the argument. This article considers cases presented in the context of stem cell research that are destructive of human embryos. I argue that certain popular cases that are meant to (...)
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  17.  9
    Perception of Value and the Minimally Conscious State.Stephen Napier - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (3):265-286.
    The “disability paradox” is the idea that for those who become severely disabled, their own quality of life assessment remains at or slightly below the QoL assessments of normal controls. This is a source of skepticism regarding third-person QoL judgments of the disabled. I argue here that this skepticism applies as well to those who are in the minimally conscious state. For rather simple means of sustaining an MCS patient’s life, the cost of being wrong that the patient would not (...)
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  18.  10
    The U.S. Regulations and the Protection of Pediatric Subjects.Stephen Napier - 2013 - Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 4 (1).
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  19.  4
    The Justification of Killing and Psychological Accounts of the Person.Stephen Napier - 2015 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 89 (4):651-680.
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  20. Catholic Hospitals, Institutional Review Boards, and Cooperation.Stephen Napier - 2011 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 11 (2):257-266.
     
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  21.  9
    Twinning, Identity, and Moral Status.Stephen Napier - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (1):42-43.
  22.  13
    Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Donald W. Musser, Rowntree S. J. Stephen, Haim Gordon, Brace Kuklick, Bradley R. Dewey & Robert L. Greenwood - 1989 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 26 (3):185-192.
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  23.  3
    Reproductive Ethics: Adaequatio and Dialogical Virtues.Stephen Napier - 2013 - Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 1 (S1).
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  24.  4
    Managing the Health Effects of Climate.A. Costello, M. Abbas, A. Allen, S. Ball, S. Bell, R. Bellamy, S. Friel, N. Groce, A. Johnson, M. Kett, M. Lee, C. Levy, M. Maslin, D. McCoy, B. McGuire, H. Montgomery, D. Napier, C. Pagel, J. Patel, J. Oliveira, N. Redclift, H. Rees, D. Rogger, J. Scott, J. Stephenson, J. Twigg, J. Wolff & C. Patterson - unknown
  25.  1
    St. Ambrose, Euthanasia, and Antisenescence Arguments: Death as a Good?Stephen Napier - 2014 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 17 (2):39-57.
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  26.  1
    Is Rowe Committed to an Expanded Version of Theism?Stephen Napier - 2002 - Sophia 41 (2):31-40.
    I argue in this paper two theses. First, I argue that the internal consistency of the argument from evil demands that it take into account some form of EST. Thus, there is no ground for the atheist to chide the theist when the theist appeals to an expanded version of theism. Second, I show that it isprima facie probable that RST does in fact ential EST. I show this by capitalizing on the distinction between what is contained in a concept (...)
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  27. Introduction: Goodness and Human Life.Stephen Napier - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (3):201-205.
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  28.  25
    Persons, Moral Worth, and Embryos: A Critical Analysis of Pro-Choice Arguments.Stephen Napier (ed.) - 2011 - Springer.
    Given the issues discussed and that the arguments in critical focus are fairly new, the collection provides a novel, comprehensive, and rigorous analysis of contemporary pro-choice arguments.”.
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  29. Vulnerable Embryos: A Critical Analysis of Twinning, Rescue, and Natural-Loss Arguments.Stephen Napier - 2010 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4):781-810.
    Contemporary philosophical discussion on human embryonic stem cell research has focused primarily on the metaphysical and meta-ethical issues suchresearch raises. Though these discussions are interesting, largely ignored are arguments rooted in the secular research ethics tradition already informing humansubject research. This tradition countenances the notion of vulnerability and that vulnerable human subjects ought to be protected from research-related harms. This is the basic idea behind the argument from vulnerability, and it enjoys prima facie plausibility. This articlepresents the vulnerability argument and (...)
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  30.  17
    Where Have All the Angels Gone?1: STEPHEN R. L. CLARK.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1992 - Religious Studies 28 (2):221-234.
    Anyone who wishes to talk about angels has to respond to the mocking question, how many of them can dance on the point of a pin. The answer is: ‘just as many as they please’. Angels being immaterial intellects do not occupy space to the exclusion of any other such intellectual substance, and their being ‘on’ the point of a pin can only mean that they attend to it. The question, however, is not one that concerned our mediaeval predecessors, although (...)
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  31.  6
    Sexual Ontology and Group Marriage: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1983 - Philosophy 58 (224):215-227.
    Philosophers of earlier ages have usually spent time in considering thenature of marital, and in general familial, duty. Paley devotes an entire book to those ‘relative duties which result from the constitution of the sexes’,1 a book notable on the one hand for its humanity and on the other for Paley‘s strange refusal to acknowledge that the evils for which he condemns any breach of pure monogamy are in large part the result of the fact that such breaches are generally (...)
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  32.  1
    Orwell and the Anti-Realists: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1992 - Philosophy 67 (260):141-154.
    The purpose of Newspeak was not only to provide a medium of expression for the world-view and mental habits proper to the devotees of Ingsoc, but to make all other modes of thought impossible.
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  33.  4
    How Many Selves Make Me?1: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1991 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 29:213-233.
    Cartesian accounts of the mental make it axiomatic that consciousness is transparent: what I feel, I know I feel, however many errors I may make about its cause. ‘I’ names a simple, unextended, irreducible substance, created ex nihilo or eternally existent, and only associated with the complete, extended, dissoluble substance or pretend-substance that is ‘my’ body by divine fiat. Good moderns take it for granted that ‘we’ now realize how shifting, foggy and deconstructible are the boundaries of the self; ‘we’ (...)
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  34.  2
    The Better Part: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1993 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 35:29-49.
    According to Aristotle, the goal of anyone who is not simply stupid or slavish is to live a worthwhile life. There are, no doubt, people who have no goal at all beyond the moment's pleasure or release from pain. There may be people incapable of reaching any reasoned decision about what to do, and acting on it. But anyone who asks how she should live implicitly agrees that her goal is to live well, to live a life that she can (...)
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  35.  2
    World Religions and World Orders: STEPHEN R. L. CLARK.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1990 - Religious Studies 26 (1):43-57.
    There are good reasons for being suspicious of the very concept of ‘a religion’, let alone a ‘world religion’. It may be useful for a hospital administrator to know a patient's ‘religion’ – as Protestant or Church of England or Catholic or Buddhist – but such labels clearly do little more than identify the most suitable chaplain, and connote groupings in the vast and confusing region of ‘religious thought and practice’ that are of very different ranks. By any rational, genealogical (...)
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  36. Abstract Morality, Concrete Cases: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1987 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 22:35-53.
    Practitioners of disciplines whose problems are debated by moral philosophers regularly complain that the philosophers are engaged in abstract speculation, divorced from ‘real-life’ consequences and responsibilities, that it is the practitioners who must take the decisions, and that they cannot act in accordance with strict abstract logic.
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  37. Descartes' Debt to Augustine: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1992 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 32:73-88.
    Jonathan Edwards identified the central act of faith as ‘the cordial consent of beings to Being in general’, which is to say to God . That equation, of Being, Truth and God, is rarely taken seriously in analytical circles. My argument will be that this is to neglect the real context of a great deal of past philosophy, particularly the very Cartesian arguments from which so many undergraduate courses begin. All too many students issue from such courses immunized against enthusiasm, (...)
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  38. Global Religion: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1994 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 36:113-128.
    The social and environmental problems that we face at this tail end of twentieth-century progress require us to identify some cause, some spirit that transcends the petty limits of our time and place. It is easy to believe that there is no crisis. We have been told too often that the oceans will soon die, the air be poisonous, our energy reserves run dry; that the world will grow warmer, coastlands be flooded and the climate change; that plague, famine and (...)
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  39. How to Become Unconscious: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 2010 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85 (67):21-44.
    Consistent materialists are almost bound to suggest that ‘conscious experience’, if it exists at all, is no more than epiphenomenal. A correct understanding of the real requires that everything we do and say is no more than a product of whatever processes are best described by physics, without any privileged place, person, time or scale of action. Consciousness is a myth, or at least a figment. Plotinus was no materialist: for him, it is Soul and Intellect that are more real (...)
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  40. Non-Personal Minds: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 53:185-209.
    Persons are creatures with a range of personal capacities. Most known to us are also people, though nothing in observation or biological theory demands that all and only people are persons, nor even that persons, any more than people, constitute a natural kind. My aim is to consider what non-personal minds are like. Darwin's Earthworms are sensitive, passionate and, in their degree, intelligent. They may even construct maps, embedded in the world they perceive around them, so as to be able (...)
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  41. Plotinus: Charms and Countercharms: Stephen R.L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 2009 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84 (65):215-231.
    For the last few years, thanks to the Leverhulme Trust, I've been largely absent from my department, working on the late antique philosopher Plotinus. To speak personally – it's been a difficult few years, since my youngest daughter has been afflicted with anorexia during this period, and my own bowel cancer was discovered, serendipitously, and removed, at the end of 2005. Since then I've had ample occasion to consider the importance – and the difficulty – of the practice of detachment, (...)
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  42. Therapy and Theory Reconstructed: Plato and His Successors: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 2010 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85 (66):83-102.
    When we speak of philosophy and therapy, or of philosophy as therapy, the usual intent is to suggest that ‘philosophizing’ is or should be a way to clarify the mind or purify the soul. While there may be little point in arguing with psychoses or deeply-embedded neuroses our more ordinary misjudgements, biases and obsessions may be alleviated, at least, by trying to ‘see things clearly and to see them whole’, by carefully identifying premises and seeing what they – rationally – (...)
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  43. The Limits of Explanation: Limited Explanations: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1990 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 27:195-210.
    When I was first approached to read a paper at the conference from which this volume takes its beginning I expected that Flint Schier, with whom I had taught a course on the Philosophy of Biology in my years at Glasgow, would be with us to comment and to criticize. I cannot let this occasion pass without expressing once again my own sense of loss. I am sure that we would all have gained by his presence, and hope that he (...)
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  44. Tools, Machines and Marvels: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1995 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 38:159-176.
    Technology, according to Derry and Williams's Short History , ‘comprises all that bewilderingly varied body of knowledge and devices by which man progressively masters his natural environment’. Their casual, and unconscious, sexism is not unrelated to my present topic. Women enter the story as spinners, burden bearers and, at long last, typists. ‘The tying of a bundle on the back or the dragging of it along upon the outspread twigs of a convenient branch are contributions [and by implication the only (...)
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  45. Not Even a Sparrow Falls: The Philosophy of Stephen R. L. Clark.Daniel A. Dombrowski - 2000 - Michigan State University Press.
    Since the mid-1970s an amazing philosopher has blazed across the philosophic sky—Stephen R. L. Clark. To date he has written twelve books, including _From Athens to Jerusalem, Aristotle's Man, Animals and Their Moral Standing, Civil Peace and Sacred Order, God's World and the Great Awakening, The Mysteries of Religion, The Moral Status of Animals, The Nature of the Beast, and A Parliament of Souls,_ as well as dozens of articles. Critics find him "arresting," "profound," "amusing," and, paradoxically, "irritating." In (...)
     
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  46. An Uneasy Case Against Property Rights in Body Parts*: STEPHEN R. MUNZER.Stephen R. Munzer - 1994 - Social Philosophy and Policy 11 (2):259-286.
    This essay deals with property rights in body parts that can be exchanged in a market. The inquiry arises in the following context. With some exceptions, the laws of many countries permit only the donation, not the sale, of body parts. Yet for some years there has existed a shortage of body parts for transplantation and other medical uses. It might then appear that if more sales were legally permitted, the supply of body parts would increase, because people would have (...)
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  47. Hart's Methodological Positivism: Stephen R. Perry.Stephen R. Perry - 1998 - Legal Theory 4 (4):427-467.
    To understand H.L.A. Hart's general theory of law, it is helpful to distinguish between substantive and methodological legal positivism. Substantive legal positivism is the view that there is no necessary connection between morality and the content of law. Methodological legal positivism is the view that legal theory can and should offer a normatively neutral description of a particular social phenomenon, namely law. Methodological positivism holds, we might say, not that there is no necessary connection between morality and law, but rather (...)
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  48.  7
    Robert Audi, Ed. The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy. Pp. Xxviii+882. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.) £55.00 Hbk, £17.95 Pbk.Stephen R.L. Clark. How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Pp. Vii+223. (London: Routledge, 1995.) £40.00.D. Z. Phillips. Introducing Philosophy. Pp. Xii+206. (Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1996.) £40.00 Hbk, £11.99 Pbk.Paul Ricoeur. Figuring the Sacred: Religion, Narrative and Imagination. Pp. Viii+340. (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1995.)Frederick Sontag. Wittgenstein and the Mystical: Philosophy as an Ascetic Practice. Pp. Xii+167. (Atlanta, Georgia: Scholars Press, 1995.) $34.95 Hbk, $22.95 Pbk. [REVIEW]Brian R. Clack, A. B. P. & R. C. B. - 1996 - Religious Studies 32 (4):529-531.
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  49. Stephen R. Kellert and Timothy J. Farnham (Eds), The Good in Nature and Humanity.R. Sandler - 2003 - Environmental Values 12 (4):539-541.
     
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  50. Book Reviews : Biology and Christian Ethics, by Stephen R. L. Clark. Cambridge University Press, 2000. 331 Pp. Hb. ISBN 0521-561310 Pb. ISBN 0521-567688. [REVIEW]O. O'Donovan - 2002 - Studies in Christian Ethics 15 (2):95-99.
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