Results for 'Stephen R. Shalom'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. East Timor Questions & Answers Stephen R. Shalom,.Noam Chomsky - unknown
    In the aftermath of World War II, U.S. policy toward the Asian colonies of the European powers followed a simple rule: where the nationalists in a territory were leftist (as in Vietnam), Washington would support the re imposition of European colonial rule, while in those places where the nationalist movement was safely non leftist (India, for example), Washington would support their independence as a way to remove them from the exclusive jurisdiction of a rival power. At first, Indonesian nationalists were (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  44
    Killing in War and Moral Equality.Stephen R. Shalom - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4):495-512.
    Do innocent civilians who will be killed in a justified attack on a nearby military target have a right to defend themselves by shooting down the bomber pilot? I argue that they do not, and that Jeff McMahan's view that they do have such a right—that there is a moral equivalence between pilot and civilian—is flawed in much the same way that Michael Walzer's moral equivalence of combatants—a position that McMahan has so persuasively refuted—is flawed.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3. Shalom on the Impermissibility of Self-Defense Against the Tactical Bomber.Uwe Steinhoff - manuscript
    A standard example of a justified aggressor is the tactical bomber who is about to destroy an ammunitions factory in a proportionate, justified military attack, full well knowing that an innocent civilian bystander will also be killed by his attack (“collateral damage”). Intuitively it seems hard to believe that the innocent bystander threatened by the tactical bomber is morally prohibited from killing him in self-defense. Yet, Stephen R. Shalom indeed endorses such a prohibition. I shall argue that all (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4. Hart's Methodological Positivism: Stephen R. Perry.Stephen R. Perry - 1998 - Legal Theory 4 (4):427-467.
    To understand H.L.A. Hart's general theory of law, it is helpful to distinguish between substantive and methodological legal positivism. Substantive legal positivism is the view that there is no necessary connection between morality and the content of law. Methodological legal positivism is the view that legal theory can and should offer a normatively neutral description of a particular social phenomenon, namely law. Methodological positivism holds, we might say, not that there is no necessary connection between morality and law, but rather (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  5. An Uneasy Case Against Property Rights in Body Parts*: STEPHEN R. MUNZER.Stephen R. Munzer - 1994 - Social Philosophy and Policy 11 (2):259-286.
    This essay deals with property rights in body parts that can be exchanged in a market. The inquiry arises in the following context. With some exceptions, the laws of many countries permit only the donation, not the sale, of body parts. Yet for some years there has existed a shortage of body parts for transplantation and other medical uses. It might then appear that if more sales were legally permitted, the supply of body parts would increase, because people would have (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  6.  23
    Slaves and Citizens: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1985 - Philosophy 60 (231):27-46.
    R. M. Hare has argued 1 that there are conceivable circumstances in which it would be right not to abolish the institution of slavery: in the imaginary land of Juba established slave-plantations are managed by a benevolent elite for the good of all, no ‘cruel or unusual ’ punishments are in use, and citizens of the neighbouring island of Camaica, ‘free ’but impoverished, regularly seek to become slaves. Hare adds that it is unlikely, given human nature, that ‘masters ’would treat (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  43
    Plotinus: Charms and Countercharms: Stephen R.L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 2009 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 65:215-231.
    For the last few years, thanks to the Leverhulme Trust, I've been largely absent from my department, working on the late antique philosopher Plotinus. To speak personally – it's been a difficult few years, since my youngest daughter has been afflicted with anorexia during this period, and my own bowel cancer was discovered, serendipitously, and removed, at the end of 2005. Since then I've had ample occasion to consider the importance – and the difficulty – of the practice of detachment, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  32
    How to Become Unconscious: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 2010 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 67:21-44.
    Consistent materialists are almost bound to suggest that ‘conscious experience’, if it exists at all, is no more than epiphenomenal. A correct understanding of the real requires that everything we do and say is no more than a product of whatever processes are best described by physics, without any privileged place, person, time or scale of action. Consciousness is a myth, or at least a figment. Plotinus was no materialist: for him, it is Soul and Intellect that are more real (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  28
    Non-Personal Minds: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 53:185-209.
    Persons are creatures with a range of personal capacities. Most known to us are also people, though nothing in observation or biological theory demands that all and only people are persons, nor even that persons, any more than people, constitute a natural kind. My aim is to consider what non-personal minds are like. Darwin's Earthworms are sensitive, passionate and, in their degree, intelligent. They may even construct maps, embedded in the world they perceive around them, so as to be able (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  25
    Abstract Morality, Concrete Cases: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1987 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 22:35-53.
    Practitioners of disciplines whose problems are debated by moral philosophers regularly complain that the philosophers are engaged in abstract speculation, divorced from ‘real-life’ consequences and responsibilities, that it is the practitioners who must take the decisions, and that they cannot act in accordance with strict abstract logic.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  23
    Descartes' Debt to Augustine: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1992 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 32:73-88.
    Jonathan Edwards identified the central act of faith as ‘the cordial consent of beings to Being in general’, which is to say to God . That equation, of Being, Truth and God, is rarely taken seriously in analytical circles. My argument will be that this is to neglect the real context of a great deal of past philosophy, particularly the very Cartesian arguments from which so many undergraduate courses begin. All too many students issue from such courses immunized against enthusiasm, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  23
    The Better Part: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1993 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 35:29-49.
    According to Aristotle, the goal of anyone who is not simply stupid or slavish is to live a worthwhile life. There are, no doubt, people who have no goal at all beyond the moment's pleasure or release from pain. There may be people incapable of reaching any reasoned decision about what to do, and acting on it. But anyone who asks how she should live implicitly agrees that her goal is to live well, to live a life that she can (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  14
    Tools, Machines and Marvels: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1995 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 38:159-176.
    Technology, according to Derry and Williams's Short History , ‘comprises all that bewilderingly varied body of knowledge and devices by which man progressively masters his natural environment’. Their casual, and unconscious, sexism is not unrelated to my present topic. Women enter the story as spinners, burden bearers and, at long last, typists. ‘The tying of a bundle on the back or the dragging of it along upon the outspread twigs of a convenient branch are contributions [and by implication the only (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  36
    Global Religion: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1994 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 36:113-128.
    The social and environmental problems that we face at this tail end of twentieth-century progress require us to identify some cause, some spirit that transcends the petty limits of our time and place. It is easy to believe that there is no crisis. We have been told too often that the oceans will soon die, the air be poisonous, our energy reserves run dry; that the world will grow warmer, coastlands be flooded and the climate change; that plague, famine and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  25
    Deconstructing the Laws of Logic: Stephen R.L. Clark.Stephen R. Clark - 2008 - Philosophy 83 (1):25-53.
    I consider reasons for questioning ‘the laws of logic’, and suggest that these laws do not accord with everyday reality. Either they are rhetorical tools rather than absolute truths, or else Plato and his successors were right to think that they identify a reality distinct from the ordinary world of experience, and also from the ultimate source of reality.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  75
    Kant's Argument for Radical Evil.Stephen R. Grimm - 2002 - European Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):160–177.
  17.  91
    Therapy and Theory Reconstructed: Plato and His Successors: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 2010 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 66:83-102.
    When we speak of philosophy and therapy, or of philosophy as therapy, the usual intent is to suggest that ‘philosophizing’ is or should be a way to clarify the mind or purify the soul. While there may be little point in arguing with psychoses or deeply-embedded neuroses our more ordinary misjudgements, biases and obsessions may be alleviated, at least, by trying to ‘see things clearly and to see them whole’, by carefully identifying premises and seeing what they – rationally – (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  34
    Sexual Ontology and Group Marriage: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1983 - Philosophy 58 (224):215-227.
    Philosophers of earlier ages have usually spent time in considering thenature of marital, and in general familial, duty. Paley devotes an entire book to those ‘relative duties which result from the constitution of the sexes’,1 a book notable on the one hand for its humanity and on the other for Paley‘s strange refusal to acknowledge that the evils for which he condemns any breach of pure monogamy are in large part the result of the fact that such breaches are generally (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19.  33
    Orwell and the Anti-Realists: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1992 - Philosophy 67 (260):141-154.
    The purpose of Newspeak was not only to provide a medium of expression for the world-view and mental habits proper to the devotees of Ingsoc, but to make all other modes of thought impossible.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20.  11
    On a Possible Argument for Averroes's Single Separate Intellect.Stephen R. Ogden - 2016 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 4 (1).
    Averroes held the controversial thesis that there is only one separate material or possible intellect for all humans. This paper analyzes a passage from his Long Commentary on the De Anima which has been thought to constitute a primary philosophical argument for the view. It is called the Determinate Particular Argument, because it contends that the material intellect cannot be a determinate particular if it is to be the ontological receptacle of universal intelligible forms. After defending one crucial premise, it (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  41
    Where Have All the Angels Gone?1: STEPHEN R. L. CLARK.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1992 - Religious Studies 28 (2):221-234.
    Anyone who wishes to talk about angels has to respond to the mocking question, how many of them can dance on the point of a pin. The answer is: ‘just as many as they please’. Angels being immaterial intellects do not occupy space to the exclusion of any other such intellectual substance, and their being ‘on’ the point of a pin can only mean that they attend to it. The question, however, is not one that concerned our mediaeval predecessors, although (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  31
    The Limits of Explanation: Limited Explanations: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1990 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 27:195-210.
    When I was first approached to read a paper at the conference from which this volume takes its beginning I expected that Flint Schier, with whom I had taught a course on the Philosophy of Biology in my years at Glasgow, would be with us to comment and to criticize. I cannot let this occasion pass without expressing once again my own sense of loss. I am sure that we would all have gained by his presence, and hope that he (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  21
    World Religions and World Orders: STEPHEN R. L. CLARK.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1990 - Religious Studies 26 (1):43-57.
    There are good reasons for being suspicious of the very concept of ‘a religion’, let alone a ‘world religion’. It may be useful for a hospital administrator to know a patient's ‘religion’ – as Protestant or Church of England or Catholic or Buddhist – but such labels clearly do little more than identify the most suitable chaplain, and connote groupings in the vast and confusing region of ‘religious thought and practice’ that are of very different ranks. By any rational, genealogical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  13
    Thinking About How and Why to Think 1: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1996 - Philosophy 71 (277):385-403.
    1. Believing Enough to Think The Scottish system of university education requires most aspirants to an Ordinary Degree to study some philosophy. Philosophers in Scottish Universities must therefore contend with enormous first-year classes, stocked with youngsters who have little real desire to be philosophers, or even to philosophize. Some years ago, at Glasgow, a question in the final exam was as follows: ‘“Philosophy is of no use, and so should not be studied.” Discuss’. A couple of hundred students answered, more (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  41
    How Many Selves Make Me?1: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1991 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 29:213-233.
    Cartesian accounts of the mental make it axiomatic that consciousness is transparent: what I feel, I know I feel, however many errors I may make about its cause. ‘I’ names a simple, unextended, irreducible substance, created ex nihilo or eternally existent, and only associated with the complete, extended, dissoluble substance or pretend-substance that is ‘my’ body by divine fiat. Good moderns take it for granted that ‘we’ now realize how shifting, foggy and deconstructible are the boundaries of the self; ‘we’ (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. The Things We Mean.Stephen R. Schiffer - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    Stephen Schiffer presents a groundbreaking account of meaning and belief, and shows how it can illuminate a range of crucial problems regarding language, mind, knowledge, and ontology. He introduces the new doctrine of 'pleonastic propositions' to explain what the things we mean and believe are. He discusses the relation between semantic and psychological facts, on the one hand, and physical facts, on the other; vagueness and indeterminacy; moral truth; conditionals; and the role of propositional content in information acquisition and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   190 citations  
  27.  9
    The Nature of Theology and the Extent of the Atonement.Stephen R. Holmes - 2018 - Perichoresis 16 (4):3-18.
    This article considers the post-Reformation debates over the extent of the Atonement. It traces the origins of these debates from the articles of the Arminian Remonstrance of 1610 through the declarations of the supporters of the Synod of Dort in 1618-19. The debate is then considered in relation to an English Baptist context, and specifically the exegetical dispute over the meaning of the word ‘all’ in 2 Corinthians 5:14-15 and Romans 3:23-4. Three options are examined and the various difficulties in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  83
    Remnants of Meaning.Stephen R. Schiffer - 1987 - MIT Press.
    In this foundational work on the theory of linguistic and mental representation, Stephen Schiffer surveys all the leading theories of meaning and content in the philosophy of language and finds them lacking. He concludes that there can be no correct, positive philosophical theory or linguistic or mental representation and, accordingly advocates the deflationary "no-theory theory of meaning and content." Along the way he takes up functionalism, the nature of propositions and their suitability as contents, the language of thought and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   195 citations  
  29. Meaning.Stephen R. Schiffer - 1972 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford, Clarendon Press.
    What is it for marks or sounds to have meaning, and what is it for someone to mean something in producing them? Answering these and related questions, Schiffer explores communication, speech acts, convention, and the meaning of linguistic items in this reissue of a seminal work on the foundations of meaning. A new introduction takes account of recent developments and places his theory in a broader context.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   216 citations  
  30. Kant and the New Philosophy of Religion.Chris L. Firestone & Stephen R. Palmquist (eds.) - 2006 - Indiana University Press.
    While earlier work has emphasized Kant’s philosophy of religion as thinly disguised morality, this timely and original reappraisal of Kant’s philosophy of religion incorporates recent scholarship. In this volume, Chris L. Firestone, Stephen R. Palmquist, and the other contributors make a strong case for more specific focus on religious topics in the Kantian corpus. Main themes include the relationship between Kant’s philosophy of religion and his philosophy as a whole, the contemporary relevance of specific issues arising out of Kant’s (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  31. An Introduction to Content and its Role in Explanation.Stephen R. Schiffer - manuscript
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Meanings and Concepts.Stephen R. Schiffer - 1998 - Lingua E Stile 33 (3):399-411.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33. Is Understanding a Species of Knowledge?Stephen R. Grimm - 2006 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (3):515-535.
    Among philosophers of science there seems to be a general consensus that understanding represents a species of knowledge, but virtually every major epistemologist who has thought seriously about understanding has come to deny this claim. Against this prevailing tide in epistemology, I argue that understanding is, in fact, a species of knowledge: just like knowledge, for example, understanding is not transparent and can be Gettiered. I then consider how the psychological act of "grasping" that seems to be characteristic of understanding (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   192 citations  
  34. Meaning.Stephen R. Schiffer - 1973 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 163:478-479.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   213 citations  
  35. Understanding.Stephen R. Grimm - 2011 - In D. Pritchard S. Berneker (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Epistemology. Routledge.
    This entry offers a critical overview of the contemporary literature on understanding, especially in epistemology and the philosophy of science.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   79 citations  
  36.  16
    The Value of Life: Biological Diversity and Human Society.Stephen R. Kellert & Stephen H. Kellert - 1996 - Island Press.
    The Value of Life is an exploration of the actual and perceived importance of biological diversity for human beings and society. Stephen R. Kellert identifies ten basic values, which he describes as biologically based, inherent human tendencies that are greatly influenced and moderated by culture, learning, and experience. Drawing on 20 years of original research, he considers: the universal basis for how humans value nature differences in those values by gender, age, ethnicity, occupation, and geographic location how environment-related activities (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  37. The Biophilia Hypothesis.Stephen R. Kellert & Edward O. Wilson - 1993 - Island Press.
    This book brings together the views of some of the most creative scientists of our time, each attempting to amplify and refine the concept of biophilia. Contributors to this volume include Jared Diamond, Aaron Katcher, Richard Nelson and others.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  38. Truth and the Theory of Content.Stephen R. Schiffer - 1981 - In Herman Parret (ed.), Meaning and Understanding. Berlin.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   106 citations  
  39. The Moral Status of Animals.Stephen R. L. Clark - 1977 - Oxford University Press.
  40. Epistemic Normativity.Stephen R. Grimm - 2009 - In Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 243-264.
    In this article, from the 2009 Oxford University Press collection Epistemic Value, I criticize existing accounts of epistemic normativity by Alston, Goldman, and Sosa, and then offer a new view.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   52 citations  
  41.  78
    Do the Eyes Have It? Cues to the Direction of Social Attention.Stephen R. H. Langton, Roger J. Watt & Vicki Bruce - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):50-59.
  42. The Goal of Explanation.Stephen R. Grimm - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (4):337-344.
    I defend the claim that understanding is the goal of explanation against various persistent criticisms, especially the criticism that understanding is not truth-connected in the appropriate way, and hence is a merely psychological state. Part of the reason why understanding has been dismissed as the goal of explanation, I suggest, is because the psychological dimension of the goal of explanation has itself been almost entirely neglected. In turn, the psychological dimension of understanding—the Aha! experience, the sense that a certain explanation (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   58 citations  
  43. Knowledge, Practical Interests, and Rising Tides.Stephen R. Grimm - 2015 - In John Greco & David Henderson (eds.), Epistemic Evaluation: Purposeful Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    Defenders of pragmatic encroachment in epistemology (or what I call practicalism) need to address two main problems. First, the view seems to imply, absurdly, that knowledge can come and go quite easily—in particular, that it might come and go along with our variable practical interests. We can call this the stability problem. Second, there seems to be no fully satisfying way of explaining whose practical interests matter. We can call this the “whose stakes?” problem. I argue that both problems can (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  44. On Intellectualism in Epistemology.Stephen R. Grimm - 2011 - Mind 120 (479):705-733.
    According to ‘orthodox’ epistemology, it has recently been said, whether or not a true belief amounts to knowledge depends exclusively on truth-related factors: for example, on whether the true belief was formed in a reliable way, or was supported by good evidence, and so on. Jason Stanley refers to this as the ‘intellectualist’ component of orthodox epistemology, and Jeremy Fantl and Matthew McGrath describe it as orthodox epistemology’s commitment to a ‘purely epistemic’ account of knowledge — that is, an account (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  45. What is Philosophy as a Way of Life? Why Philosophy as a Way of Life?Stephen R. Grimm & Caleb Cohoe - 2021 - Wiley: European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):236-251.
    Despite a recent surge of interest in philosophy as a way of life, it is not clear what it might mean for philosophy to guide one's life, or how a “philosophical” way of life might differ from a life guided by religion, tradition, or some other source. We argue against John Cooper that spiritual exercises figure crucially in the idea of philosophy as a way of life—not just in the ancient world but also today, at least if the idea is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  46. Wisdom.Stephen R. Grimm - 2015 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (1):1-16.
    What is it that makes someone wise, or one person wiser than another? I argue that wisdom consists in knowledge of how to live well, and that this knowledge of how to live well is constituted by various further kinds of knowledge. One concern for this view is that knowledge is not needed for wisdom but rather some state short of knowledge, such as having rational or justified beliefs about various topics. Another concern is that the emphasis on knowing how (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  47. Explaining Understanding: New Perspectives From Epistemology and Philosophy of Science.Stephen R. Grimm, Christoph Baumberger & Sabine Ammon (eds.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    What does it mean to understand something? What types of understanding can be distinguished? Is understanding always provided by explanations? And how is it related to knowledge? Such questions have attracted considerable interest in epistemology recently. These discussions, however, have not yet engaged insights about explanations and theories developed in philosophy of science. Conversely, philosophers of science have debated the nature of explanations and theories, while dismissing understanding as a psychological by-product. In this book, epistemologists and philosophers of science together (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  48. Epistemic Goals and Epistemic Values.Stephen R. Grimm - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (3):725-744.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  49.  3
    Kant and Mysticism: Critique as the Experience of Baring All in Reason's Light.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2019 - Lexington Books.
    Kant and Mysticism interprets Kant’s early criticism of Swedenborg’s mysticism as the fountainhead of the Critical philosophy. Kantian Critique revolutionizes not only traditional metaphysics, but also our understanding of mysticism: Critical mysticism is a unitive experience that impels us to lay bare all human pretensions to reason’s light.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  50.  4
    The Nature of the Beast: Are Animals Moral?Stephen R. L. Clark (ed.) - 1982 - Oxford University Press.
1 — 50 / 1000