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Stephen E. Robbins [13]Stephen F. Robbins [1]Stephen Robbins [1]
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  1.  97
    Bergson and the Holographic Theory of Mind.Stephen E. Robbins - 2006 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (3-4):365-394.
    Bergson’s model of time (1889) is perhaps the proto-phenomenological theory. It is part of a larger model of mind (1896) which can be seen in modern light as describing the brain as supporting a modulated wave within a holographic field, specifying the external image of the world, and wherein subject and object are differentiated not in terms of space, but of time. Bergson’s very concrete model is developed and deepened with Gibson’s ecological model of perception. It is applied to the (...)
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  2.  13
    Semantic Redintegration: Ecological Invariance.Stephen E. Robbins - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):726-727.
    In proposing that their model can operate in the concrete, perceptual world, Rogers & McClelland (R&M) have not done justice to the complexities of the ecological sphere and its invariance laws. The structure of concrete events forces a different framework, both for retrieval of events and concepts defined across events, than that upon which the proposed model, rooted in essence in the verbal learning tradition, implicitly rests.
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  3. The Case for Qualia. [REVIEW]Stephen Robbins - 2010 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 31 (1-2):141-156.
    This is a review of "The Case for Qualia" (Ed., Edmund Wright). The review is in three parts. In Part 1, I briefly lay out the general metaphysic in which the debate on qualia has been unfolding. I term it the classical or spatial metaphysic. In Part 2, we traverse the essays and relate them – the problems with which they grapple, the pitfalls they encounter – to this classic metaphysic. In Part 3, I will briefly sketch out a transformed (...)
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  4.  34
    Bergson, Perception and Gibson.Stephen E. Robbins - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (5):23-45.
    Bergson's 1896 theory of perception/memory assumed a framework anticipating the quantum revolution in physics, the still unrealized implications of this framework contributing to the large neglect of Bergson today. The basics of his model are explored, including the physical concepts he advanced before the crisis in classical physics, his concept of perception as ‘virtual action’ with its relativistic implications, and his unique explication of the subject/object relationship. All form the basis for his solution to the ‘hard’ problem. The relation between (...)
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  5.  38
    Virtual Action: O'Regan & Noë Meet Bergson.Stephen E. Robbins - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):906-907.
    Bergson, writing in 1896, anticipated “sensorimotor contingencies” under the concept that perception is “virtual action.” But to explain the external image, he embedded this concept in a holographic framework where time-motion is an indivisible and the relation of subject/object is in terms of time. The target article's account of qualitative visual experience falls short for lack of this larger framework. [Objects] send back, then, to my body, as would a mirror, their eventual influence; they take rank in an order corresponding (...)
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  6. Meditation on a Mousetrap: On Consciousness and Cognition, Evolution, and Time.Stephen E. Robbins - 2012 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 33 (1):69.
    Evolutionary theory has yet to offer a detailed model of the complex transitions from a living system of one design to another of more advanced, or simply different, design. Hidden within the writings of evolution's expositors is an implicit appeal to AI-like processes operating within the "cosmic machine" that has hitherto been evolving the plethora of functional living systems we observe. In these writings, there is disturbingly little understanding of the deep problems involved, resting as they do in the very (...)
     
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  7.  27
    The Cost of Explicit Memory.Stephen E. Robbins - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (1):33-66.
    Within Piaget there is an implicit theory of the development of explicit memory. It rests in the dynamical trajectory underlying the development of causality, object, space and time – a complex (COST) supporting a symbolic relationship integral to the explicit. Cassirer noted the same dependency in the phenomena of aphasias, insisting that a symbolic function is being undermined in these deficits. This is particularly critical given the reassessment of Piaget’s stages as the natural bifurcations of a self-organizing dynamic system. The (...)
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  8.  6
    Analogical Reminding and the Storage of Experience: The Paradox of Hofstadter-Sander.Stephen E. Robbins - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (3):355-385.
    In their exhaustive study of the cognitive operation of analogy, Hofstadter and Sander arrive at a paradox: the creative and inexhaustible production of analogies in our thought must derive from a “reminding” operation based upon the availability of the detailed totality of our experience. Yet the authors see no way that our experience can be stored in the brain in such detail nor do they see how such detail could be accessed or retrieved such that the innumerable analogical remindings we (...)
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  9.  3
    Children’s Transposition as Related to Ratio of the Training Stimuli and Language.Stephen F. Robbins & Kenneth L. Witte - 1978 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 11 (5):298-300.
  10. Commentary On: A Sensorimotor Account of Vision and Visual Consciousness. Authors' Reply.Bruce Bridgeman, Naoyuki Osaka, Stephen E. Robbins, Peter D. Sparks & Ee Krieckhaus - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):904-908.
     
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