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  1.  32
    History and Neuroscience: An Integrative Legacy.Stephen T. Casper - 2014 - Isis 105 (1):123-132.
    The attitudes that characterize the contemporary “neuro-turn” were strikingly commonplace as part of the self-fashioning of social identity in the biographies and personal papers of past neurologists and neuroscientists. Indeed, one fundamental connection between nineteenth- and twentieth-century neurology and contemporary neuroscience appears to be the value that workers in both domains attach to the idea of integration, a vision of neural science and medicine that connected reductionist science to broader inquiries about the mind, brain, and human nature and in so (...)
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  2.  23
    A History of the Locked-In-Syndrome: Ethics in the Making of Neurological Consciousness, 1880-Present.Stephen T. Casper - 2020 - Neuroethics 13 (2):145-161.
    Extensive scholarship has described the historical and ethical imperatives shaping the emergence of the brain death criteria in the 1960s and 1970s. This essay explores the longer intellectual history that shaped theories of neurological consciousness from the late-nineteenth century to that period, and argues that a significant transformation occurred in the elaboration of those theories in the 1960s and after, the period when various disturbances of consciousness were discovered or thoroughly elaborated. Numerous historical conditions can be identified and attributed to (...)
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  3.  25
    Andrew Scull. Madness in Civilization: A Cultural History of Insanity From the Bible to Freud, From the Madhouse to Modern Medicine. 448 Pp., Figs., Bibl., Index. London: Thames & Hudson, 2015. £28. [REVIEW]Stephen T. Casper - 2016 - Isis 107 (3):608-609.
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  4. Chickens and Eggs: A Commentary on Chris Renwick’s “Completing the Circle of the Social Sciences? William Beveridge and Social Biology at London School of Economics During the 1930s”.Stephen T. Casper - 2014 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (4):506-514.
    Why would anyone want there to be natural foundations for the social sciences? In a provocative essay exploring precisely that question, historian Chris Renwick uses an interwar debate featuring William Beveridge, Lancelot Hogben, and Friedrich Hayek to begin to imagine what might have been had such a program calling for biological knowledge to form the natural bases of the social sciences been realized at the London School of Economics. Yet perhaps Renwick grants too much attention to differences and “what-ifs” and (...)
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  5.  5
    Chickens and Eggs: A Commentary on Chris Renwick’s “Completing the Circle of the Social Sciences? William Beveridge and Social Biology at London School of Economics During the 1930s”.Stephen T. Casper - 2014 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (4):506-514.
    Why would anyone want there to be natural foundations for the social sciences? In a provocative essay exploring precisely that question, historian Chris Renwick uses an interwar debate featuring William Beveridge, Lancelot Hogben, and Friedrich Hayek to begin to imagine what might have been had such a program calling for biological knowledge to form the natural bases of the social sciences been realized at the London School of Economics. Yet perhaps Renwick grants too much attention to differences and “what-ifs” and (...)
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  6.  22
    Emil du Bois-Reymond and the Tradition of German Physiological Science: Gabriel Finkelstein: Emil du Bois-Reymond: Neuroscience, Self, and Society in Nineteenth-Century Germany. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2013, 384pp, $38.00, £26.95 HB.Stephen T. Casper - 2015 - Metascience 24 (1):85-86.
    In 1872, Emil du Bois-Reymond delivered an astonishing lecture entitled “The Limits of Science” at a Congress of German Scientists and Physicians in Leipzig. No stranger to polemic and bellicose oratory, and possessing among his generation of physiologists unmatched rhetorical abilities, du Bois-Reymond had already attracted much public recognition and acclaim for his denigration of French culture at a time when belligerence and competition between Prussia and France had peaked. Yet, the topic of his 1872 lecture had a signal significance (...)
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  7.  7
    John Burnham.Stephen T. Casper - 2018 - Isis 109 (1):140-142.
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  8.  18
    Of Means and Ends: Mind and Brain Science in the Twentieth Century.Stephen T. Casper - 2015 - Science in Context 28 (1):1-7.
    What role does context play in the mind and brain sciences? This introductory article, “Of Means and Ends,” explores that question through its focus on the ways scientists and physicians engaged with and constructed technology in the mind and brain sciences in the twentieth century. This topical issue addresses how scientists, physicians, and psychologists came to see the ends of technology as important in-and-of themselves. In so doing, the authors of these essays offer an interpretation of historian Paul Forman's revisionist (...)
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  9.  25
    Reductionism in Epigenetics.Stephen T. Casper - 2018 - History of the Human Sciences 31 (1):132-135.
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  10.  1
    “With Hindsight, I See That I Was Right”: John C. Burnham’s Final Words, as Recounted by a Trickster.Stephen T. Casper - 2019 - Isis 110 (4):792-795.
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  11.  31
    Of Psychometric Means: Starke R. Hathaway and the Popularization of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory.Rebecca Schilling & Stephen T. Casper - 2015 - Science in Context 28 (1):77-98.
    ArgumentThe Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory was developed at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, in the 1930s and 1940s. It became a highly successful and highly controversial psychometric tool. In professional terms, psychometric tools such as the MMPI transformed psychology and psychiatry. Psychometric instruments thus readily fit into the developmental history of psychology, psychiatry, and neurology; they were a significant part of the narrative of those fields’ advances in understanding, intervening, and treating people with mental illnesses. At the same time, the (...)
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