Results for 'Stevan Ilić'

184 found
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  1.  18
    Relationship Between Obesity Decrease and Regression of Hypertensive Left Ventricular Hypertrophy.S. I. Tasić, B. Lović, Stevan Ilić, Dragan Đorđević & Nataša Miladinović-Tasić - 2002 - Facta Universitatis 9:181-8.
  2.  13
    The Five Years Predictive Value of QTc Interval and QTc Interval Dispersion in Hypertensive Patients with Left Ventricular Hypertrophy.D. Đorđević, Branko Lović, Stevan Ilić, Marina Deljanin Ilić & Ivan Tasić - 2005 - Facta Universitatis 12 (3):135-9.
  3.  22
    An Alternative Normalization of the Implicative Fragment of Classical Logic.Branislav Boričić & Mirjana Ilić - 2015 - Studia Logica 103 (2):413-446.
    A normalizable natural deduction formulation, with subformula property, of the implicative fragment of classical logic is presented. A traditional notion of normal deduction is adapted and the corresponding weak normalization theorem is proved. An embedding of the classical logic into the intuitionistic logic, restricted on propositional implicational language, is described as well. We believe that this multiple-conclusion approach places the classical logic in the same plane with the intuitionistic logic, from the proof-theoretical viewpoint.
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  4. To Listen or Not to Listen?Ljubica Ilic - 2012 - Evental Aesthetics 1 (3):82-89.
    In 1965, Claude Chabrol created La Muette – a fifteen-minute homage to Paris’s sixteenth district. In this short movie, Chabrol uses silence to ask some fundamental questions about the nature of human coexistence: the movie is seen, or better heard, from the perspective of a boy who, ignored by his parents, does not manage to say a word throughout; provoked by this imposed restriction, the boy decides to become not only “mute” but also “deaf.” His decision, however, results in tragic (...)
     
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  5.  12
    An Alternative Natural Deduction for the Intuitionistic Propositional Logic.Mirjana Ilić - 2016 - Bulletin of the Section of Logic 45 (1).
    A natural deduction system NI, for the full propositional intuitionistic logic, is proposed. The operational rules of NI are obtained by the translation from Gentzen’s calculus LJ and the normalization is proved, via translations from sequent calculus derivations to natural deduction derivations and back.
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  6.  16
    Parental Decision-Making on Childhood Vaccination.Kaja Damnjanović, Johanna Graeber, Sandra Ilić, Wing Y. Lam, Žan Lep, Sara Morales, Tero Pulkkinen & Loes Vingerhoets - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  7.  38
    Stress in Workplace-Possible Prevention.Mirjana Aranđelović & Ivana Ilić - 2006 - Facta Universitatis 13 (3):139-144.
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  8. What is Computation (and is Cognition That).Harnad Stevan - 1995 - Minds and Machines 4:377-378.
  9.  2
    University Student Engagement Inventory : Transcultural Validity Evidence Across Four Continents.Hugo Assunção, Su-Wei Lin, Pou-Seong Sit, Kwok-Cheung Cheung, Heidi Harju-Luukkainen, Thomas Smith, Benvindo Maloa, Juliana Álvares Duarte Bonini Campos, Ivana Stepanovic Ilic, Giovanna Esposito, Freda Maria Francesca & João Marôco - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  10.  6
    “Herzallerliebstes Helenchen”. Mileva Einsteins Briefe an Helene Savić.Mirjana Ilić & Andreas Kleinert - 2003 - NTM Zeitschrift für Geschichte der Wissenschaften, Technik und Medizin 11 (1):29-33.
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  11.  5
    An Alternative Gentzenisation of RW+∘.Mirjana Ilić - 2016 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 62 (6):465-480.
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  12.  8
    Network Analysis Using a Novel Highly Discriminating Topological Index.Mircea V. Diudea, Aleksandar Ilić, Kurt Varmuza & Matthias Dehmer - 2011 - Complexity 16 (6):32-39.
  13.  5
    Simple Types in Discretely Ordered Structures.Dejan Ilić - 2014 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 53 (7-8):929-947.
    We introduce a notion of simplicity for types in discretely ordered first order structures. We prove that all the structure on the locus of a simple type is induced exclusively by the ordering relation. As an application we determine all possible expansions of satisfying CB = 1.
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  14.  4
    Ḥüseyin Lāmekānī: Ein osmanischer Dichter und Mystiker und sein literarisches WerkHuseyin Lamekani: Ein osmanischer Dichter und Mystiker und sein literarisches Werk.Robert Dankoff, Slobodan Ilič & Slobodan Ilic - 2001 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 121 (4):715.
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  15.  4
    Kako Pišemo Umjetnost? Problemi Ne-Čitkosti Umjetničkog Djelovanja U Epohi Novih Medija.Vlatko Ilić - 2010 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 30 (4):635-648.
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  16.  3
    How Do We Write Art? Problems of Art Un-Readability in the Era of New Media.Vlatko Ilic - 2010 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 30 (4):635-648.
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  17. Stevan Dedijer: An 'Elitist Egalitarian,'.Jan Annerstedt & Andrew Jamison - 1988 - In Stevan Dedijer, Jan Annerstedt & Andrew Jamison (eds.), From Research Policy to Social Intelligence: Essays for Stevan Dedijer. Macmillan Press. pp. 1904--1987.
     
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  18. From Research Policy to Social Intelligence: Essays for Stevan Dedijer.Stevan Dedijer, Jan Annerstedt & Andrew Jamison (eds.) - 1988 - Macmillan Press.
  19.  14
    Human Families. Social Change in Global Perspective. By Stevan Harrell. Pp. 598. (Westview Press, Oxford, 1997.) £55.00. [REVIEW]W. D. Wilder - 1998 - Journal of Biosocial Science 30 (4):561-566.
  20.  3
    A Historical Jesus Hallucinating During His Initial Spirit-Possession Experience: A Response to Stevan Da Vies' Interpretation of Jesus' Baptism by John.Johan Strijdom - 1998 - Hts Theological Studies 54 (3/4).
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  21. Virtual Symposium on Virtual Mind.Patrick Hayes, Stevan Harnad, Donald Perlis & Ned Block - 1992 - Minds and Machines 2 (3):217-238.
    When certain formal symbol systems (e.g., computer programs) are implemented as dynamic physical symbol systems (e.g., when they are run on a computer) their activity can be interpreted at higher levels (e.g., binary code can be interpreted as LISP, LISP code can be interpreted as English, and English can be interpreted as a meaningful conversation). These higher levels of interpretability are called "virtual" systems. If such a virtual system is interpretable as if it had a mind, is such a "virtual (...)
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  22.  10
    The Revolt of the Widows: The Social World of the Apocryphal Acts.Stevan L. Davies - 1980 - Southern Illinois University Press.
    In this first study of the social context that produced the Apocryphal Acts, Stevan L. Davies con­tends that women wrote the Acts and that the “Acts appear to have been a striving by Christian women for both a mode of self-expression and ...
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  23. The Symbol Grounding Problem.Stevan Harnad - 1990 - Physica D 42:335-346.
    There has been much discussion recently about the scope and limits of purely symbolic models of the mind and about the proper role of connectionism in cognitive modeling. This paper describes the symbol grounding problem : How can the semantic interpretation of a formal symbol system be made intrinsic to the system, rather than just parasitic on the meanings in our heads? How can the meanings of the meaningless symbol tokens, manipulated solely on the basis of their shapes, be grounded (...)
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  24.  89
    Consciousness: An Afterthought.Stevan Harnad - 1982 - Cognition and Brain Theory 5:29-47.
    There are many possible approaches to the mind/brain problem. One of the most prominent, and perhaps the most practical, is to ignore it.
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  25.  65
    Categorical Perception.Stevan Harnad - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group. pp. 67--4.
  26. Other Bodies, Other Minds: A Machine Incarnation of an Old Philosophical Problem. [REVIEW]Stevan Harnad - 1991 - Minds and Machines 1 (1):43-54.
    Explaining the mind by building machines with minds runs into the other-minds problem: How can we tell whether any body other than our own has a mind when the only way to know is by being the other body? In practice we all use some form of Turing Test: If it can do everything a body with a mind can do such that we can't tell them apart, we have no basis for doubting it has a mind. But what is (...)
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  27.  52
    Psychophysical and Cognitive Aspects of Categorical Perception:A Critical Overview.Stevan Harnad - unknown
    There are many entry points into the problem of categorization. Two particularly important ones are the so-called top-down and bottom-up approaches. Top-down approaches such as artificial intelligence begin with the symbolic names and descriptions for some categories already given; computer programs are written to manipulate the symbols. Cognitive modeling involves the further assumption that such symbol-interactions resemble the way our brains do categorization. An explicit expectation of the top-down approach is that it will eventually join with the bottom-up approach, which (...)
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  28. The Timing of a Conscious Decision: From Ear to Mouth.Stevan Harnad - unknown
    Libet, Gleason, Wright, & Pearl (1983) asked participants to report the moment at which they freely decided to initiate a pre-specified movement, based on the position of a red marker on a clock. Using event-related potentials (ERPs), Libet found that the subjective feeling of deciding to perform a voluntary action came after the onset of the motor “readiness potential,” RP). This counterintuitive conclusion poses a challenge for the philosophical notion of free will. Faced with these findings, Libet (1985) proposed that (...)
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  29. Connecting Object to Symbol in Modeling Cognition.Stevan Harnad - 1992 - In A. Clark & Ronald Lutz (eds.), Connectionism in Context. Springer Verlag. pp. 75--90.
    Connectionism and computationalism are currently vying for hegemony in cognitive modeling. At first glance the opposition seems incoherent, because connectionism is itself computational, but the form of computationalism that has been the prime candidate for encoding the "language of thought" has been symbolic computationalism (Dietrich 1990, Fodor 1975, Harnad 1990c; Newell 1980; Pylyshyn 1984), whereas connectionism is nonsymbolic (Fodor & Pylyshyn 1988, or, as some have hopefully dubbed it, "subsymbolic" Smolensky 1988). This paper will examine what is and is not (...)
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  30. Interactive Cognition: Exploring the Potential of Electronic Quote/Commenting.Stevan Harnad - unknown
    Human cognition is not an island unto itself. As a species, we are not Leibnizian Monads independently engaging in clear, Cartesian thinking. Our minds interact. That's surely why our species has language. And that interactivity probably constrains both what and how we think.
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  31. Distributed Processes, Distributed Cognizers and Collaborative Cognition.Stevan Harnad - 2005 - [Journal (Paginated)] (in Press) 13 (3):01-514.
    Cognition is thinking; it feels like something to think, and only those who can feel can think. There are also things that thinkers can do. We know neither how thinkers can think nor how they are able do what they can do. We are waiting for cognitive science to discover how. Cognitive science does this by testing hypotheses about what processes can generate what doing (“know-how”) This is called the Turing Test. It cannot test whether a process can generate feeling, (...)
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  32.  98
    To Cognize is to Categorize: Cognition is Categorization.Stevan Harnad - 2005 - In C. Lefebvre & H. Cohen (eds.), Handbook of Categorization. Elsevier.
    2. Invariant Sensorimotor Features ("Affordances"). To say this is not to declare oneself a Gibsonian, whatever that means. It is merely to point out that what a sensorimotor system can do is determined by what can be extracted from its motor interactions with its sensory input. If you lack sonar sensors, then your sensorimotor system cannot do what a bat's can do, at least not without the help of instruments. Light stimulation affords color vision for those of us with the (...)
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  33. Minds, Machines and Searle.Stevan Harnad - 1989 - Journal of Theoretical and Experimental Artificial Intelligence 1:5-25.
    Searle's celebrated Chinese Room Argument has shaken the foundations of Artificial Intelligence. Many refutations have been attempted, but none seem convincing. This paper is an attempt to sort out explicitly the assumptions and the logical, methodological and empirical points of disagreement. Searle is shown to have underestimated some features of computer modeling, but the heart of the issue turns out to be an empirical question about the scope and limits of the purely symbolic (computational) model of the mind. Nonsymbolic modeling (...)
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  34. Can a Machine Be Conscious? How?Stevan Harnad - 2003 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (4-5):67-75.
    A "machine" is any causal physical system, hence we are machines, hence machines can be conscious. The question is: which kinds of machines can be conscious? Chances are that robots that can pass the Turing Test -- completely indistinguishable from us in their behavioral capacities -- can be conscious (i.e. feel), but we can never be sure (because of the "other-minds" problem). And we can never know HOW they have minds, because of the "mind/body" problem. We can only know how (...)
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  35. Minds, Machines and Turing: The Indistinguishability of Indistinguishables.Stevan Harnad - 2000 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 9 (4):425-445.
    Turing's celebrated 1950 paper proposes a very general methodological criterion for modelling mental function: total functional equivalence and indistinguishability. His criterion gives rise to a hierarchy of Turing Tests, from subtotal ("toy") fragments of our functions (t1), to total symbolic (pen-pal) function (T2 -- the standard Turing Test), to total external sensorimotor (robotic) function (T3), to total internal microfunction (T4), to total indistinguishability in every empirically discernible respect (T5). This is a "reverse-engineering" hierarchy of (decreasing) empirical underdetermination of the theory (...)
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  36. Why and How We Are Not Zombies.Stevan Harnad - 1994 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 1 (2):164-67.
    A robot that is functionally indistinguishable from us may or may not be a mindless Zombie. There will never be any way to know, yet its functional principles will be as close as we can ever get to explaining the mind.
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  37.  10
    Distributed Processes, Distributed Cognizers, and Collaborative Cognition.Stevan Harnad - 2005 - Pragmatics and Cognition 13 (3):501-514.
    Cognition is thinking; it feels like something to think, and only those who can feel can think. There are also things that thinkers can do. We know neither how thinkers can think nor how they are able to do what they can do. We are waiting for cognitive science to discover how. Cognitive science does this by testing hypotheses about what processes can generate what doing.This is called the Turing Test. It cannot test whether a process can generate feeling, hence (...)
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  38. Symbol Grounding and the Symbolic Theft Hypothesis.Angelo Cangelosi, Alberto Greco & Stevan Harnad - 2002 - In A. Cangelosi & D. Parisi (eds.), Simulating the Evolution of Language. Springer Verlag. pp. 191--210.
    Scholars studying the origins and evolution of language are also interested in the general issue of the evolution of cognition. Language is not an isolated capability of the individual, but has intrinsic relationships with many other behavioral, cognitive, and social abilities. By understanding the mechanisms underlying the evolution of linguistic abilities, it is possible to understand the evolution of cognitive abilities. Cognitivism, one of the current approaches in psychology and cognitive science, proposes that symbol systems capture mental phenomena, and attributes (...)
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  39. Minds, Machines and Searle.Stevan Harnad - 1989 - Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Artificial Intelligence 1 (4):5-25.
    Searle's celebrated Chinese Room Argument has shaken the foundations of Artificial Intelligence. Many refutations have been attempted, but none seem convincing. This paper is an attempt to sort out explicitly the assumptions and the logical, methodological and empirical points of disagreement. Searle is shown to have underestimated some features of computer modeling, but the heart of the issue turns out to be an empirical question about the scope and limits of the purely symbolic model of the mind. Nonsymbolic modeling turns (...)
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  40.  27
    Symbol‐Grounding Problem.Stevan Harnad - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
  41.  49
    The Latent Structure of Dictionaries.Philippe Vincent-Lamarre, Alexandre Blondin Massé, Marcos Lopes, Mélanie Lord, Odile Marcotte & Stevan Harnad - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (3):625-659.
    How many words—and which ones—are sufficient to define all other words? When dictionaries are analyzed as directed graphs with links from defining words to defined words, they reveal a latent structure. Recursively removing all words that are reachable by definition but that do not define any further words reduces the dictionary to a Kernel of about 10% of its size. This is still not the smallest number of words that can define all the rest. About 75% of the Kernel turns (...)
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  42.  38
    Learned Inquiry and the Net: The Role of Peer Review, Peer Commentary and Copyright.Stevan Harnad - unknown
    Peer Review and Copyright each have a double role: Formal refereeing protects (R1) the author from publishing and (R2) the reader from reading papers that are not of sufficient quality. Copyright protects the author from (C1) theft of text and (C2) theft of authorship. It has been suggested that in the electronic medium we can dispense with peer review, "publish" everything, and let browsing and commentary do the quality control. It has also been suggested that special safeguards and laws may (...)
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  43.  92
    Category Induction and Representation.Stevan Harnad - 1987 - In [Book Chapter].
    A provisional model is presented in which categorical perception (CP) provides our basic or elementary categories. In acquiring a category we learn to label or identify positive and negative instances from a sample of confusable alternatives. Two kinds of internal representation are built up in this learning by "acquaintance": (1) an iconic representation that subserves our similarity judgments and (2) an analog/digital feature-filter that picks out the invariant information allowing us to categorize the instances correctly. This second, categorical representation is (...)
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  44. Computation is Just Interpretable Symbol Manipulation; Cognition Isn't.Stevan Harnad - 1994 - Minds and Machines 4 (4):379-90.
    Computation is interpretable symbol manipulation. Symbols are objects that are manipulated on the basis of rules operating only on theirshapes, which are arbitrary in relation to what they can be interpreted as meaning. Even if one accepts the Church/Turing Thesis that computation is unique, universal and very near omnipotent, not everything is a computer, because not everything can be given a systematic interpretation; and certainly everything can''t be givenevery systematic interpretation. But even after computers and computation have been successfully distinguished (...)
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  45. Lunch Uncertain [Review Of: Floridi, Luciano (2011) The Philosophy of Information (Oxford)]. [REVIEW]Stevan Harnad - 2011 - Times Literary Supplement 5664 (22-23).
    The usual way to try to ground knowing according to contemporary theory of knowledge is: We know something if (1) it’s true, (2) we believe it, and (3) we believe it for the “right” reasons. Floridi proposes a better way. His grounding is based partly on probability theory, and partly on a question/answer network of verbal and behavioural interactions evolving in time. This is rather like modeling the data-exchange between a data-seeker who needs to know which button to press on (...)
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  46.  90
    Turing Indistinguishability and the Blind Watchmaker.Stevan Harnad - 2002 - In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Consciousness Evolving. John Benjamins. pp. 3-18.
    Many special problems crop up when evolutionary theory turns, quite naturally, to the question of the adaptive value and causal role of consciousness in human and nonhuman organisms. One problem is that -- unless we are to be dualists, treating it as an independent nonphysical force -- consciousness could not have had an independent adaptive function of its own, over and above whatever behavioral and physiological functions it "supervenes" on, because evolution is completely blind to the difference between a conscious (...)
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  47.  42
    Creative Disagreement.Stevan Harnad - unknown
    Do scientists agree? It is not only unrealistic to suppose that they do, but probably just as unrealistic to think that they ought to. Agreement is for what is already established scientific history. The current and vital ongoing aspect of science consists of an active and often heated interaction of data, ideas and minds, in a process one might call "creative disagreement." The "scientific method" is largely derived from a reconstruction based on selective hindsight. What actually goes on has much (...)
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  48.  36
    Categorical Perception and the Evolution of Supervised Learning in Neural Nets.Stevan Harnad & SJ Hanson - unknown
    Some of the features of animal and human categorical perception (CP) for color, pitch and speech are exhibited by neural net simulations of CP with one-dimensional inputs: When a backprop net is trained to discriminate and then categorize a set of stimuli, the second task is accomplished by "warping" the similarity space (compressing within-category distances and expanding between-category distances). This natural side-effect also occurs in humans and animals. Such CP categories, consisting of named, bounded regions of similarity space, may be (...)
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  49.  31
    Grounding Symbols in the Analog World with Neural Nets a Hybrid Model.Stevan Harnad - unknown
    1.1 The predominant approach to cognitive modeling is still what has come to be called "computationalism" (Dietrich 1990, Harnad 1990b), the hypothesis that cognition is computation. The more recent rival approach is "connectionism" (Hanson & Burr 1990, McClelland & Rumelhart 1986), the hypothesis that cognition is a dynamic pattern of connections and activations in a "neural net." Are computationalism and connectionism really deeply different from one another, and if so, should they compete for cognitive hegemony, or should they collaborate? These (...)
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  50.  18
    Minds, Machines and Turing: The Indistinguishability of Indistinguishables.Stevan Harnad - unknown
    Turing's celebrated 1950 paper proposes a very general methodological criterion for modelling mental function: total functional equivalence and indistinguishability. His criterion gives rise to a hierarchy of Turing Tests, from subtotal ("toy") fragments of our functions (t1), to total symbolic (pen-pal) function (T2 -- the standard Turing Test), to total external sensorimotor (robotic) function (T3), to total internal microfunction (T4), to total indistinguishability in every empirically discernible respect (T5). This is a "reverse-engineering" hierarchy of (decreasing) empirical underdetermination of the theory (...)
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