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Steve Heilig [39]Steve L. Heilig [2]
  1.  85
    Giving “Moral Distress” a Voice: Ethical Concerns Among Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Personnel.Pam Hefferman & Steve Heilig - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (2):173-178.
    Advances in life-sustaining medical technology as applied to neonatal cases frequently present ethical concerns with a strong emotional component. Neonates delivered in the gestation period of approximately 23held hostagemoral distress” regarding aggressive courses of treatment for some patients. Some of this distress results from a feeling of powerlessness regarding treatment decisions, coupled with a high intensity of hands-on contact with the patients and family. Lack of authority coupled with high responsibility may itself be a recipe for a different kind of (...)
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  2.  39
    Physician Aid-in-Dying: Toward A “Harm Reduction” Approach.Steve Heilig & Stephen Jamison - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (1):113.
    As a bioethical and social issue, euthanasia has become in the 1990s what abor- tion was in the 1960s. Around the world, a de facto taboo on open discussion of the practice is seemingly falling by the wayside, as recognition increases that “active” euthanasia is taking place in spite of social and legal prohibitions. Euthanasia, or more specifically physician-assisted suicide, has become the most visible bioethical issue of the present era; and in the United States the debate has taken on (...)
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  3.  16
    Honest Mistakes: From the Physician Father of a Young Patient.Steve Heilig - 1994 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (4):636.
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  4.  33
    Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the School of Health Science and Nursing, University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and Professor at the School of Public Health, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. [REVIEW]Rachel A. Ankeny, M. L. S. Bette Anton, Ana Borovecki, Alister Browne, Debora Diniz, Elisa J. Gordon, Matti Häyry & Steve Heilig - 2004 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13:215-217.
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  5.  32
    William Andereck, MD, is Chair of the Ethics Committees at California Pacific Medical Center and the Pacific Fertility Center, San Francisco, California. Lori B. Andrews, JD, is Professor of Law at Chicago-Kent College of Law and Senior Scholar at the Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago, Illinois. [REVIEW]Kenneth M. Boyd, Robert V. Brody, David A. Buehler, Daniel Callahan, Kevin T. FitzGerald, Elizabeth Graham, John Harris, Steve Heilig & Søren Holm - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7:117-118.
  6.  16
    David Buehler, M. Div., MA, is Founder of Bioethika Online Publishers and Also Serves as Chaplain to the University Lutheran Ministry of Providence, Rhode Island. Michael M. Burgess, Ph. D., is Chair in Biomedical Ethics, Centre for Applied Ethics at The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. [REVIEW]Arthur L. Caplan, Thomas A. Cavanaugh, Mildred K. Cho, Steve Heilig, John Hubert, Kenneth V. Iserson, Tom Koch & Mark G. Kuczewski - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7:335-336.
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  7.  11
    Bette Anton, MLS, is the Head Librarian of the Optometry Library/Health Sciences Information Service. This Library Serves the University of California at Berkeley–University of California at San Francisco Joint Medical Program and the University of California at Berkeley School of Optometry. Robert Baker, Ph. D., is Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Center For. [REVIEW]Jack Coulehan, John B. Davis, Joseph C. D’Oronzio, Steve Heilig, D. Micah Hester, Kenneth V. Iserson & Greg Loeben - 2002 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11:327-328.
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  8.  20
    Nancy Berlinger, Ph. D., M. Div., is Deputy Director and Associate for Religious Studies at The Hastings Center, Garrison, New York. Michael A. DeVita, MD, is Associate Professor of Critical Care Medicine and Internal Medicine and Chair of the UPMC Ethics Committee, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. [REVIEW]Barbara J. Evans, Sven Ove Hansson, Steve Heilig, Ana Smith Iltis, Kenneth V. Iserson, Anita F. Khayat, Greg Loeben, Jerry Menikoff & Rebecca D. Pentz - 2004 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13:313-314.
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  9.  58
    Murder or Mercy? The Debate Over Active Euthanasia has Only Just Begun.Steve Heilig - 1991 - HEC Forum 3 (2):95-98.
  10.  8
    RU 486: What Physicians Know, Think and (Might) Do?A Survey of California Obstetrician/Gynecologists.Steve L. Heilig - 1992 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (3):184-187.
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  11.  1
    RU 486: What Physicians Know, Think and Do?A Survey of California Obstetrician/Gynecologists.Steve L. Heilig - 1992 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (3):184-187.
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  12.  45
    The 'Abortion Pill': Ru 486: A Woman's Choice, Etienne-Emile Baulieu with Mort Rosenblum. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1991 238 PP. [REVIEW]Steve Heilig - 1992 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (3):281.
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  13.  27
    Participation in Torture and Interrogation: An Inexcusable Breach of Medical Ethics—A Call to Hold Military Medical Personnel Accountable to Accepted Professional Standards.Philip R. Lee, Marcus Conant, Albert R. Jonsen & Steve Heilig - 2006 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (2):202-203.
    The profession of medicine has developed codes of ethical conduct for thousands of years. From the Hippocratic Oath of ancient Greece onward to modern times, a universal and central element of such codes has expressed the imperative that a physician shall “Do no harm.”.
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  14.  48
    A Modern Public Health Crisis: A Physician Speaks About Healthcare in Post-Glasnost Russia.Steve Heilig - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (2):257-258.
    I work at a large urban medical center. Our hospital has over 1,200 beds and was built in 1805 to take care of the poor. Our patients are still poor, but now so are the hospital and the doctors. Russian doctors are paid about one-third of what truck drivers are paid. The government historically allocates no more than 3% of the budget to medicine because this is not a means of production, like manufacturing.
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  15.  21
    CQ Interview with Sherwin Nuland on How We Die.Steve Heilig - 1994 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (4):624.
  16.  29
    Commentary: Koch on Kevorkian: Who Knows Best?Steve Heilig - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):441-442.
    Tom Koch's review of Jack Kevorkian's is a valuable look at this one (in)famous crusader's practices. The immediate question raised, and to which Koch provides his own perspectives, is what practical conclusions might be drawn from the final experiences and actions of this cohort of suffering individuals. My briefest and perhaps flippant answer is —including, unfortunately, those derived or hinted at by Koch himself.
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  17.  27
    Final Passages: Positive Choices for the Dying and Their Loved Ones, Judith Ahronheim and Doron Weber, New York: Simon & Schuster, 1992. 285 Pp. - A Good Death: Taking More Control at the End of Your Life, David Shirley and T. Patrick Hill, New York: Addison-Wesley, 1992. 224 Pp. [REVIEW]Steve Heilig - 1993 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (1):111.
  18.  21
    Health Care Without Harm: Cleaning Up Healthcare's Act.Steve Heilig - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (4):561-563.
    is a new campaign devoted to reducing the environmental harmsgenerated by the healthcare industry. One of the leading local proponents of this effort is Michael Lerner, founder of Commonweal, a Bolinas, Californiagenius grant”).
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  19.  32
    Hospice with a Zen Twist: A Talk with Zen Hospice Founder Frank Ostaseski.Steve Heilig - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (3):322-325.
    Although housed in an anonymous Victorian house in San Francisco, California, the Zen Hospice Project is world renowned for its pioneering model of training hospice volunteers, providing direct services to patients, and offering educational programs to the broader public.
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  20.  23
    Physician-Hastened Death and End-of-Life Care: Development of a Community-Wide Consensus Statement and Guidelines.Steve Heilig & Robert V. Brody - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (2):223-225.
    In mid-1996, the United States Supreme Court agreed to hear arguments and rule on two lower court cases that would, if upheld, legalize physician-assisted suicide in twelve states, including California. At about the same time, at a national meeting dealing with this controversial topic, several participants from the San Francisco Bay Area got together to ask, Based on the old principle of the suggestion was made that the local ethics committee network might be interested in developing guidelines for the care (...)
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  21.  30
    Ram Dass on Being a Patient.Steve Heilig - 2000 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (3):435-438.
    Ram Dass is one of America's most renowned spiritual teachers. Born Richard Alpert, he received his Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University and taught there and at Harvard University before going to India and receiving the name Ram Dass () from his guru. He has long been involved in many charitable service organizations, particularly those devoted to providing healthcare for underserved populations. Among his many books are BeHereNow, HowCanIHelp, and CompassioninAction; his newest book is StillHere:EmbracingAging,Changing,andDying.
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  22.  33
    Reflections on a Hospice Memorial Service.Steve Heilig - 2002 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (4):432-434.
    It's a chilly winter night outside, but very warm inside the hospice guest house. All of the people gathered here have wished one another “Happy New Year” and settled on cushions in the big meeting hall. Both fireplaces are lit, and the many little white cards with the names of each person who died last year are arranged on the mantels over the fireplaces and on a table in the center of the room. Paul, our teacher for the evening, says (...)
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  23.  23
    Single Effect: From the Step-Grandson of a Deceased Patient.Steve Heilig - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (3):406.
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  24.  34
    Sick: The Untold Story of America's Health Care Crisis and the People Who Pay the Price, by Jonathan Cohn.Steve Heilig - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (4):491.
  25.  25
    The Need for More Physicians Trained in Abortion: Raising Future Physicians' Awareness.Steve Heilig & Therese S. Wilson - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (4):485-488.
    A woman presents to her physician with a newly diagnosed condition that in her considered and informed judgment requires an elective surgical procedure. The physician, after speaking with her, agrees that this is an acceptable option. The procedure in question is in fact one of the commonest surgeries performed on American women. The physician is also aware that although the procedure is deemed elective in this and in most cases, research has shown that the consequences of not providing the procedure (...)
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  26.  6
    From the Editors Terra Incognita: Uncharted Terrain Between Doctors and Patients.David C. Thomasma, Thomasine Kushner & Steve Heilig - 2000 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (1):1-2.
    New beginnings give us the opportunity to do better “the next time.” In the rush to welcome the new millennium, it is fitting to take time to look more thoughtfully at issues not adequately covered in decades past. Robert Frost's musing about less traveled roads gives poetic life to the theme of this CQ Special Section, exploring some of the all too unknown territory between doctors and patients.
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