54 found
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  1.  9
    Abigail L. Rosenthal: A Good Look at Evil, New Edition.Steven G. Smith - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (3):475-480.
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  2.  15
    What We Have Time For: Historical Responsibility on the Largest Scale.Steven G. Smith - forthcoming - Journal of the Philosophy of History.
  3.  1
    Responsibility in Religiosity.Steven G. Smith - forthcoming - Religious Studies:1-17.
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  4.  6
    Idealism And Exteriority: The Case Of Eberhard Grisebach.Steven G. Smith - 1989 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 20 (May):136-149.
    What is the relation between the thought of exteriority (that is, of an intellectually unencompassable Other taken to be a supreme source or condition of meaning) and the idealism, subjective or objective, that it reacts against? Eberhard Grisebach makes a good case study because his exteriority statement (Gegenwart, 1928) is unsurpassably extreme yet evolves in discernible stages from an idealist starting-point. After considering parallels with Buber and Levinas and criticisms from several sources, I argue that the exteriority strategy for thinking (...)
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  5.  16
    The Argument From Meaning to God In Buber’s I and Thou.Steven G. Smith - 1987 - International Philosophical Quarterly 27 (4):347-363.
    Buber's assertions about the relation between the self (I) and God (the Eternal You) amount to an "argument" which means reasonably to bring its audience to awareness of God. This reasoning is better understood and evaluated if it is presented in a more conventionally argumentative form than Buber gave it. The key premises are: 1) Buber's account of I-You saying as a general theory of meaning and criterion of reality, and 2) Buber's claim that You-saying in encounters with finite beings (...)
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  6.  50
    Worthiness to Be Happy and Kant’s Concept of the Highest Good.Steven G. Smith - 1984 - Kant-Studien 75 (1-4):168-190.
    Some of kant's rationales for conceiving the highest good of morality as virtue rewarded with happiness rest on the subject's "necessary" natural desire for happiness, While others appeal to a still-Obscure principle of moral desert. The principle, I argue, Is that the moral agent qua moral necessarily hopes for the "approval" of fellow moral legislators and god, Who "would" (did they exist, And if they could) signify their approval by bestowing the means of happiness.
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  7.  29
    Homicide and Love.Steven G. Smith - 1991 - Philosophy and Theology 5 (3):259-276.
    For perspicuous comparison and evaluation of moral positions on life-and-death issues, it is necessary to take into account the different meanings that killing and getting killed can bear in the two dimensions of dealing with persons (intention meeting intention) and handling them. A homicidal scenario in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight shows the possibility of courteous dealing coinciding with lethal handling. The extreme possibility of lovingly affirming persons while killing them, suggested by the Augustinian “kindly severity” ideal for state-sponsored (...)
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  8.  42
    Kinds of Best World.Steven G. Smith - 1998 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 44 (3):145-162.
  9. The Argument to the Other. Reason Beyond Reason in the Thought of Karl Barth and Emmanuel Levinas.Steven G. Smith - 1985 - Religious Studies 21 (1):125-126.
     
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  10.  14
    The Modern Self in the Labyrinth. [REVIEW]Steven G. Smith - 2005 - Review of Metaphysics 58 (3):653-654.
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  11.  19
    The Argument From Meaning to God In Buber's I and Thou.Steven G. Smith - 1987 - International Philosophical Quarterly 27 (4):347-363.
    Buber's assertions about the relation between the self (I) and God (the eternal You) amount to an argument which means reasonably to bring its audience to awareness of God. This reasoning is better understood and evaluated if it is presented in a more conventionally argumentative form than Buber gave it. The key premises are (1) Buber's account of I-You saying as a general theory of meaning and criterion of reality, and (2) Buber's claim that You-saying in encounters with finite being (...)
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  12. The Concept of the Spiritual. An Essay in First Philosophy.Steven G. Smith - 1988 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 53 (4):738-738.
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  13.  14
    Trying and Getting Credit.Steven G. Smith - 1988 - Philosophy and Theology 3 (2):133-144.
    Trying, a central human concern, is actualized and beheld in rather pure form in athletic endeavor, where successful trying interests us as a revelation of a waxing kind of human being, full of promise. In the moral life trying is not so openly displayed, yet one’s standing in the moral system of evaluation is determined by it. The honor attaching to athletic success models the moral community’s confirmation of individuals’ commitment to it.
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  14.  14
    The Evidence of God Having Spoken.Steven G. Smith - 1986 - Faith and Philosophy 3 (1):68-77.
    God’s revelation is not uncommonly represented as a past speaking---“God has spoken,” “We have heard.” In order to study how the possibilities of reasoning are affected when the crucial evidence to which reasoning may appeal is a remembered speaking, a parableis offered in which three young brothers dispute whether their mother has called them home. Their arguments necessarily take an ad hominem tum. It is found that the claims of the brother who remembers hearing are provisionally, partially, and prescriptively reasonable. (...)
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  15.  21
    Intrinsic Value, Goodness, and the Appeals of Things.Steven G. Smith - 2010 - International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (2):167-181.
    “Intrinsic value” is a perplexing notion in that it purports to establish a relationship with a thing that cannot in fact be established by the valuing subject butcan only be welcomed. An important sense of “good” expresses the non-axiological side of shared flourishing. We do need the concept of intrinsic value to put our different kinds of value in order, but we can also recognize that the positing of intrinsic value is grounded on events of appeal wherein perceived beings promise (...)
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  16.  2
    Reason as One for Another: Moral and Theoretical Argument in the Philosophy of Levinas.Steven G. Smith - 1981 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 12 (3):231-244.
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  17.  22
    The Mind-Matter Inversions: Bergson's Conception of Mental and Material Actuality.Steven G. Smith - 2002 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (2):295-314.
    The development of a metaphysics of actuality is reconstructed from Plato through Bergson to capitalize on Bergson's suggestion that mind and matter can be understood as inversions of each other, respectively a centralizing of extension and an extending of centrality. This view avoids the pitfalls of reductive monism and disjunctive dualism: it is dyadic (cognizant at once of mind-matter difference and of the unity of reality), symmetrical (not apt to close off prematurely our reckoning with complexity and change, on either (...)
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  18.  20
    Hooks.Steven G. Smith - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (3):311-319.
    Hooks are the particular elements in works of art that are in fact specially compelling for individual subjects. Hooks have their own kind of aesthetic meaningfulness that is obscured by the calculations of cultural manipulators, on the one hand, and by leading aesthetic theories’ insistence upon subordinating parts of a work to the whole, on the other. Hook appreciation inspires desirable adjustments in those theories.
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  19.  10
    In Defense of Mentalism. [REVIEW]Steven G. Smith - 1989 - Review of Metaphysics 43 (1):173-174.
  20.  21
    Daimon Thinking and the Question of Spiritual Power.Steven G. Smith - 2014 - Heythrop Journal 55 (2):173-187.
    The notion of a “daimon” or compellingly life-commanding being represents a certain stage in the historical articulation of conceptions of spiritual power, in the perspective of a general phenomenology of spiritual life like van der Leeuw’s, but also a certain relationship with spiritual power that remains meaningful at any time, as Plato and Neoplatonists theorized. Focusing on normative rather than psychological issues, I propose several topics and tasks for a renewed agenda for reflective daimon thinking.
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  21.  5
    Meaningful Moral Freedom.Steven G. Smith - 2017 - International Philosophical Quarterly 57 (2):155-172.
    Kant’s central notion of a “causality of freedom” seems inconsistent with his theoretical analysis of causation. Because of its detachment from any reference to time, it is also seriously in tension with ordinary moral ideals of individuality, efficacy, responsiveness, and personal growth in the exercise of freedom. I suggest a way of conceiving moral freedom that avoids the absurdity of practical timelessness while preserving the main strengths of Kant’s theories of theoretical and practical meaning, including his refusal to specify the (...)
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  22.  9
    The Watcher and the Lens.Steven G. Smith - 2015 - British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (2):199-208.
    A Lens Problem arises when a movie viewer is dissatisfied with the physical information provided by shots taken with non-normal lenses. Experiences will vary, but the real possibility of the Lens Problem points to an important dimension of movie experience that is neglected by theories oriented to realistic seeing or imaginative seeing-as. Before we construe a presentation as documentary or fictional, we are in the first place watchers: our more or less constant watchful interest in gleaning useful information about position (...)
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  23.  9
    The First Person. [REVIEW]Steven G. Smith - 1986 - Idealistic Studies 16 (3):271-272.
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  24.  10
    The Roar of the Lion, the Taste of the Salt: On Really Religious Reasons.Steven G. Smith - 2012 - Religious Studies 48 (4):479 - 496.
    Some of the most significant religious appeals can be taken as reasons of a distinctively religious kind. But many popular ways of interpreting religious reasoning pose obstacles to appreciating religious reasons as such. To avoid binding the concept of religious reason to an intellectual programme that requires a disjunction between the religious and the rational or that dissolves all tension between religious claims and general rational standards of validity and normativity, religious reasons can be defined for purposes of liberal study (...)
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  25.  15
    Bowl Climbing: The Logic of Religious Question Rivalry. [REVIEW]Steven G. Smith - 1994 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 36 (1):27 - 43.
    Religious positions can differ more deeply in asking rival questions than in offering rival answers to a common question. What is the logic of basic question rivalry? Questions are rivals when they make incompatible assumptions and one has to choose between them. The more basic the questions the greater the discontinuity that switching between them might bring to one's life. Choice of questions must fit the overall aim of whichever question is taken to be least avoidable. Avoidableness depends partly on (...)
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  26.  14
    The Religious Appeals of Transworth and Transtrying.Steven G. Smith - 2004 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 55 (2):109-125.
    The sense of a religious life ideal typically depends on an ordinary practical understanding of selfhood and success (worthiness) that it both departs from (toward a higher excellence) and trades on. Serenity and passion are examined as ways of transmuting ordinary trying and worth.
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  27.  8
    Greatness in Theism and Atheism: The Anselm-Feuerbach Conversation.Steven G. Smith - 1996 - Modern Theology 12 (4):385-403.
  28.  6
    The Consolations of Philosophy. [REVIEW]Steven G. Smith - 1991 - International Philosophical Quarterly 31 (2):243-244.
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  29.  6
    The Work of Service.Steven G. Smith - 2009 - Levinas Studies 4:157-176.
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  30.  10
    Three Religious Attitudes.Steven G. Smith - 1998 - Philosophy and Theology 11 (1):3-24.
    Attitude is an important criterion and cause of religiousness, though it is commonly mishandled in religious reflection by (1) skewing the anthropologically central variable of attitude toward “feeling,” on the side of affect, or toward “disposition,” on the side of will, and (2) obscuring different basic forms and validities of religious attitude by insisting on one overly narrow or misleadingly rounded-out conception of devoutness (most often, “faith”). This paper develops a more adequate conception of attitude in general and of the (...)
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  31.  7
    Realizing.Steven G. Smith - 1992 - American Philosophical Quarterly 29 (4):363 - 371.
    Elucidation of the epistemic fulfillment of "realizing" in imaginative, intellectual, and spiritual modes.
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  32.  12
    Worthy Actions.Steven G. Smith - 2001 - The Journal of Ethics 5 (4):315-333.
    Concrete worthy actions have not been aterminus of discernment for moral theory in theway that they often are for the deliberatingmoral agent. Some ordinary hallmarks of worthyactions challenge the unworldly and impersonalways of envisioning life that dominatephilosophical ethics. I discuss six: a worthyaction (1) improves the world in moralperspective, (2) discloses the agent''s power,(3) is personally rewarding, (4) unites virtue,justice, and happiness, (5) is a prime objectof moral choice, and (6) belongs to a practicalgenre (such as work or love). Appreciatingworthy (...)
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  33.  3
    Das Sein Und der Andere: Levinas’ Auseinandersetzung MIT Heidegger. [REVIEW]Steven G. Smith - 1992 - International Studies in Philosophy 24 (1):108-109.
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  34.  6
    Das Sein Und der Andere. [REVIEW]Steven G. Smith - 1992 - International Studies in Philosophy 24 (1):108-109.
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  35.  9
    The Causation of Finality.Steven G. Smith - 1985 - American Philosophical Quarterly 22 (4):311 - 320.
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  36.  4
    Historical Meaningfulness in Shared Action.Steven G. Smith - 2009 - History and Theory 48 (1):1-19.
    Why should past occurrences matter to us as such? Are they in fact meaningful in a specifically historical way, or do they only become meaningful in being connected to other sorts of meaning—political or speculative, for example—as many notable theorists imply? Ranke and Oakeshott affirmed a purely historical meaningfulness but left its nature unclear. The purpose of this essay is to confirm historical meaningfulness by arguing that our commanding practical interest in how we share action with other actors is distinctively (...)
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  37.  2
    The Mind-Matter Inversions: Bergson’s Conception of Mental and Material Actuality.Steven G. Smith - 2002 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (2):295-314.
    The development of a metaphysics of actuality is reconstructed from Plato through Bergson to capitalize on Bergson's suggestion that mind and matter can be understood as inversions of each other, or as respectively a centering and an extending of forms. This view avoids the pitfalls of reductive monism and disjunctive dualism: it is dyadic (cognizant at once of mind-matter difference and of the unity of reality), symmetrical (not apt to close off prematurely our reckoning with complexity and change, on either (...)
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  38.  2
    The Face of the Other and the Trace of God: Essays on the Philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas. [REVIEW]Steven G. Smith - 2003 - International Studies in Philosophy 35 (1):131-133.
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  39.  4
    Can I Know Your IQ?Steven G. Smith - 1997 - Public Affairs Quarterly 11 (4):365-382.
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  40.  4
    Sympathy, Scruple, and Piety: The Moral and Religious Valuation of Nonhumans.Steven G. Smith - 1993 - Journal of Religious Ethics 21 (2):319 - 342.
    Our moral valuation of nonhuman and human beings alike may arise in sympathy, the realization in feeling of a significant commonality between self and others; in scrupulous observance of policy, the affirmation in practical consistency of a system of relations with others; and in piety, the attitude of boundless appreciation and absolute scruple with respect to objects as sacred - that is, as valued for the sake of adequate valuation of the holy. Differences between the moral status of humans and (...)
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  41.  3
    On the Borders of the Worthwhile: Intoxication and Worship. [REVIEW]Steven G. Smith - 1996 - Journal of Value Inquiry 30 (1-2):279-292.
    Our actions, if we care about them positively, assume judgments of worthwhileness that have been made or could be made in their favor. But a huge proportion of humanity makes a point of engaging in two kinds of action that are (are are meant to be) specially difficult to justify as worthwhile: getting intoxicated and worshiping. Drawing comparisons with worth forms associated with play and work, I ask how intoxication and worship can be seen as worthwhile and conclude that each (...)
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  42.  3
    Great Experience.Steven G. Smith - 1995 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 29 (1):17-31.
    This essay examines the logic of greatness attributions in general and the implications of aesthetic positions taken by Hume, Shelley, and T. M. Greene in order to show how the attitude of faith, i.e. a disposition for unbounded personal growth, can constitute greatness in experiences or in objects or occasions of experience. On this basis the role of great experiences in education is elucidated. It is argued that faith takes a distinctively free aesthetic form in the educational frame of reference (...)
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  43.  2
    Denis P. Moran., Gabriel Marcel: Existentiahst Philosopher, Dramatist, Educator. [REVIEW]Steven G. Smith - 1994 - International Studies in Philosophy 26 (2):135-136.
  44.  2
    Gender and Humanity.Steven G. Smith - 1989 - Public Affairs Quarterly 3 (2):67-80.
    This paper presents three theses on the kind of human kinds represented by masculinity and femininity: (1) Genders are taken to be generic realities, (2) complementary kinds of a kind, and (3) normative and valid organizations of intention in community. Analogies are considered between gender and temperament, culture, race, age, and sexual orientation.
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  45.  2
    The Structure of Unlimited Action Sharing.Steven G. Smith - 2009 - Philosophical Frontiers: A Journal of Emerging Thought 4 (2):57-71.
    An unrestricted conception of actors and their interdependence in action has now been deployed effectively in various fields of study, but the question remains how we can discriminate reasonably in our action sharing if there is more to consider than simply putting persons ahead of things. By what general practical realizations can a universal action sharer be guided? I identify four primary levels of action sharing—-coexistence, cooperation, collaboration, and communion—-showing a distinctive complex of factual and directive considerations in each. I (...)
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  46.  2
    The Worth of Owning.Steven G. Smith - 2002 - Public Affairs Quarterly 16 (2):155-172.
    Argues against a consumption-oriented vision of agents' relation with material things that there are worthy, morally happy kinds of owner-partnership with things and that expansion of access to owner worth should be among the goals of moral, political, and economic policy.
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  47.  2
    The Face of the Other and the Trace of God. [REVIEW]Steven G. Smith - 2003 - International Studies in Philosophy 35 (1):131-133.
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  48.  1
    The Consolations of Philosophy: Hobbes’ Secret; Spinoza’s Way. [REVIEW]Steven G. Smith - 1991 - International Philosophical Quarterly 31 (2):243-244.
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  49.  1
    The First Person: An Essay on Reference and Intentionality. [REVIEW]Steven G. Smith - 1986 - Idealistic Studies 16 (3):271-272.
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  50. Appeal and Attitude.Steven G. Smith - 2005 - Indiana University Press.
    This book develops the idea that meaningfulness is specified as a relation between an acknowledged appeal and an adopted attitude. In the Axial Age classics and again in modern refoundings of philosophy and theology, ideals of a fully commanding supreme appeal and a fully adequate orientation to the world in cognizance of that appeal--a sovereign attitude--are intellectually and spiritually central. Some of the most fundamental challenges of pluralism stem from differences in appeal and attitude ideals.
     
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