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  1.  46
    The Impossible Demand of Forgiveness.Steven Gormley - 2014 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (1):27-48.
    Drawing on Jacques Derrida’s work, I argue that neither of the two standard accounts of forgiveness offer an adequate understanding of forgiveness. Conditional accounts insist on specifying the conditions an offender needs to satisfy in order to count as deserving of forgiveness. I argue that such accounts not only render forgiveness unintelligible (since forgiveness is intelligibly offered only to the offender qua offender), but also dissolve the ethical decision forgiveness demands of us. Unconditional accounts promise to do justice to both (...)
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  2.  36
    Rearticulating the Concept of Experience, Rethinking the Demands of Deconstruction.Steven Gormley - 2012 - Research in Phenomenology 42 (3):374-407.
    Abstract A principle aim of this paper is to convince friends and critics of deconstruction that they have overlooked two crucial aspects of Derrida's work, namely, his rearticulation of the concept of experience and his account of the experience of undecidability as an ordeal. This is important because sensitivity to Derrida's emphasis on the ordeal of undecidability and his rearticulation of the concept of experience-a rearticulation that is already under way in his early engagement with Husserl and continued in later (...)
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  3.  29
    Deliberation, Unjust Exclusion, and the Rhetorical Turn.Steven Gormley - 2019 - Contemporary Political Theory 18 (2):202-226.
    Theories of deliberative democracy have faced the charge of leading to the unjust exclusion of voices from public deliberation. The recent rhetorical turn in deliberative theory aims to respond to this charge. I distinguish between two variants of this response: the supplementing approach and the systemic approach. On the supplementing approach, rhetorical modes of political speech may legitimately supplement the deliberative process, for the sake of those excluded from the latter. On the systemic approach, rhetorical modes of political speech are (...)
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  4.  22
    Deliberation, Unjust Exclusion, and the Rhetorical Turn.Steven Gormley - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory:1-25.
    Theories of deliberative democracy have faced the charge of leading to the unjust exclusion of voices from public deliberation. The recent rhetorical turn in deliberative theory aims to respond to this charge. I distinguish between two variants of this response: the supplementing approach and the systemic approach. On the supplementing approach, rhetorical modes of political speech may legitimately supplement the deliberative process, for the sake of those excluded from the latter. On the systemic approach, rhetorical modes of political speech are (...)
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  5. Deliberative Theory and Deconstruction: A Democratic Venture.Steven Gormley - 2020 - Edinburgh University Press.
    Our political climate is increasingly characterised by hostility towards constructed others. Steven Gormley answers the question: what does it mean to do justice to others? He pursues this question by developing a critical, but productive, dialogue between deliberative theory and deconstruction. Two key claims emerge from this. First: doing justice to the other demands that we maintain an ethos of interruption. And secondly: Such an ethos requires a democratic form of politics. In developing this account, Gormley places deliberative theory and (...)
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  6.  12
    Perfecting Justice in Rawls, Habermas and Honneth: A Deconstructive Perspective. [REVIEW]Steven Gormley - 2014 - Critical Horizons 15 (2):206-210.
  7.  6
    Deliberation, Unjust Exclusion, and the Rhetorical Turn.Steven Gormley - forthcoming - Political Theory.
    Theories of deliberative democracy have faced the charge of leading to the unjust exclusion of voices from public deliberation. The recent rhetorical turn in deliberative theory aims to respond to this charge. I distinguish between two variants of this response: the supplementing approach and the systemic approach. On the supplementing approach, rhetorical modes of political speech may legitimately supplement the deliberative process, for the sake of those excluded from the latter. On the systemic approach, rhetorical modes of political speech are (...)
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