Results for 'Steven I. Ries'

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  1.  33
    An Intervention Curriculum for Moral Development.Steven I. Ries - 1992 - Journal of Moral Education 21 (1):41-58.
    Abstract This paper reports a study of an educational intervention curriculum and its facilitative effect upon moral development (Kohlberg, 1984). The approach of the curriculum is to facilitate moral reasoning through conceptualizing and integrating essential philosophical concepts. The curriculum is a system of reasoning discovered by the individual and then applied to any experience in life, specifically moral experiences.
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  2.  46
    Richard Taylor. Fatalism. The Philosophical Review, Vol. 71 , Pp. 56–66. - Bruce Aune. Fatalism and Professor Taylor. The Philosophical Review, Vol. 71 , Pp. 512–519. - John Turk Saunders. Professor Taylor on Fatalism. Analysis , Vol. 23, Pp. 1–2. - Richard Taylor. Fatalism and Ability: I. Analysis , Vol. 23, No. 2 , Pp. 25–27. - Peter Makepeace. Fatalism and Ability: II. Analysis , Vol. 23, Pp. 27–29. - John Turk Saunders. Fatalism and Ability: III. Fatalism and Linguistic Reform. Analysis , Vol. 23, Pp. 30–31. - Richard Sharvy. A Logical Error in Taylor's “Fatalism.” Analysis , Vol. 23, No. 4 , P. 96. - John Turk Saunders. Fatalism and the Logic of Ability. Analysis , Vol. 24 No. 1 , P. 24. - Raziel Abelson. Taylor's Fatal Fallacy. The Philosophical Review, Vol. 72 , Pp. 93–96. - Richard Taylor. A Note on Fatalism. The Philosophical Review, Vol. 72 , Pp. 497–499. - Richard Sharvy. Tautology and Fatalism. The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 61 , Pp. 293–295. - Steven Cahn. Fatalistic Argu. [REVIEW]Jonathan Bennett - 1974 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 39 (2):362-364.
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  3.  18
    GILBERT, Maurice, KESTEMONT, Guy, LEBRUN, René, RIES, Julien, SAUREN, Herbert, L'expression du sacré dans les grandes religions, tome I. Proche-Orient ancien et traditions bibliques.Paul-Hubert Poirier - 1981 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 37 (1):99-101.
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  4.  2
    Orey Steven. Relative interpretations. Zeitschrift für mathematische Logik und Grundlagen der Mathematik, vol. 7 , pp. 146–153.Feferman S., Kreisel G., and Orey S.. I-consistency and faithful interpretations. Archiv für mathematische Logik und Grundlagenforschung, vol. 6 , pp. 52–63. [REVIEW]J. R. Shoenfield - 1975 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 40 (4):627-627.
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  5. Can Suits with Negative Expected Value Really Be Profitable? I Wish to Acknowledge My Debt to Kevin Lippert for His Important Contribution to the Writing of This Article. Kevin, a Student in My Law and Economics Workshop, Wrote a Thoughtful Paper Evaluating the Theoretical Argument Advanced by David Rosenberg and Steven Shavell in Their: A Model in Which Suits Are Brought for Their Nuisance Value, 5 Intl Rev. L. Econ. 3(1985).(The Paper Was Jointly Awarded the Prize for the Best Student Paper in the ... [REVIEW]Warren F. Schwartz - 2003 - Legal Theory 9 (2):83-97.
     
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  6. Marks I Moralność W Oczach Anglosasów (Kai Nielsen, Steven C. Patten (Eds.), Marx and Morality).Krzysztof Wojciechowski - 1988 - Etyka 23.
     
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  7.  12
    Philosophy Matters: Steven Weinberg, Reductionism, and Inevitability.Bruno Nobre & Antonio Augusto Passos Videira - 2018 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 74 (1):249-278.
    According to Steven Weinberg, it is the goal of elementary particle physics to search for the final laws of physics, i.e. a simple set of principles from which everything we know about physics can be derived. The main criterion that guides the search for such a set of principles is, according to the author, the sense of inevitability of physical theories, which Weinberg conflates with the idea of beauty. The theoretical physicists’ task is, in this sense, to look for (...)
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  8. The New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy I.Burt Hopkins & Steven Crowell - 2001 - Routledge.
    CONTENTS James Mensch: Derrida-Husserl: Towards a Phenomenology of Language Burt Hopkins: Jacob Klein and the Phenomenology of History Marcus Brainard: As Fate Would Have It: Husserl on the Vocation of Philosophy Algis Mickunas: Self-Identity and Its Disruption Thomas Sheehan: Martin Heidegger, What Is Metaphysics?. A New Rendering R. O. Elveton: Husserl and Heidegger: The Structure of the World Olav Wiegand: The Phenomenological Semantics of Natural Language, Part I Steven Crowell: Gnostic Phenomenology: Eugen Fink and the Critique of Transcendental Reason (...)
     
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  9. Ontologically Grounded Subordination: A Reply to Steven B. Cowan.Adam Omelianchuk - 2011 - Philosophia Christi 13 (1):169-180.
    In a recent article Steven Cowan defended the claim that female subordination and male authority are merely functional differences. Drawing insights from Natural Law, I argue that complementarianism typically speaks of these as proper functions of male and female designs, thus making men and women metaphysically unequal in being. Furthermore, I maintain that the function "serving as a means to an end" is less valuable than the function "having the authority to direct the end." Hence, Cowan fails to defeat (...)
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  10. Review of Steven Pinker's Enlightenment NOW. [REVIEW]Nicholas Maxwell - 2018 - Metascience 27 (2):347-350.
    Steven Pinker's "Enlightenment NOW" is in many ways a terrific book, from which I have learnt much. But it is also deeply flawed. Science and reason are at the heart of the book, but the conceptions that Steven Pinker defends are damagingly irrational. And these defective conceptions of science and reason, as a result of being associated with the Enlightenment Programme for the past two or three centuries, have been responsible, in part, for the genesis of the global (...)
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  11. On Relativism and Pluralism: Response to Steven Bland.Howard Sankey - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 47:98-103.
    This paper responds to criticism presented by Steven Bland of my naturalistic approach to epistemic relativism. In my view, the central argument for epistemic relativism derives from the Pyrrhonian problem of the criterion. This opens relativism to an anti-sceptical response. I combine Roderick Chisholm’s particularist response to the problem of the criterion with a reliabilist conception of epistemic warrant. A distinction is made between epistemic norms which provide genuine warrant and those which do not. On the basis of this (...)
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  12.  9
    How Must I Explain to the Dolphins?Yvette Abrahams - 2018 - Environmental Ethics 40 (4):389-404.
    The story of change and growth, i.e., evolution, in the traditional manner, involves an epistemology of indigenous knowledge systems that admits both evolution and the divine—and therefore the human capacity for free choice—that tells us that fossil fuels are a bad choice. Steven Biko’s message of “Black Consciousness” responds to the dilemma of how we belong to the species that is damaging the planetary ecosystem, amd yet how we can deny complicity by saying that reclaiming our culture enables us (...)
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  13.  33
    Steven Crowell: Normativity and Phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger. [REVIEW]Jacob Rump - 2014 - Continental Philosophy Review 47 (3-4):479-485.
    Steven Crowell’s book is a welcome addition to the literature in phenomenology as well as a demonstration of the importance of phenomenology for those working in other areas of contemporary philosophy, especially those areas of Anglo-American philosophy concerned with normativity, meaning and the philosophy of action. Through a series of thirteen independent but thematically linked essays, he offers a novel account of the importance of normativity to phenomenology, a carefully argued re-thinking of the Husserlian and early Heideggerian accounts of (...)
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  14.  99
    Are Elementary Particles Individuals? A Critical Appreciation of Steven French and Décio Krause's Identity in Physics: A Historical, Philosophical, and Formal Analysis.Don Howard - unknown
    Steven French and Décio Krause have written what bids fair to be, for years to come, the definitive philosophical treatment of the problem of the individuality of elementary particles in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. The book begins with a long and dense argument for the view that elementary particles are most helpfully regarded as non-individuals, and it concludes with an earnest attempt to develop a formal apparatus for describing such non-individual entities better suited to the task than (...)
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  15.  52
    When Robots Would Really Be Human Simulacra: Love and the Ethical in Spielberg's AI and Proyas's I, Robot.Bert Olivier - 2008 - Film-Philosophy 12 (2):30-44.
    Steven Spielberg’s AI – Artificial Intelligence, and Alex Proyas’s neo-noir, I, Robot, may both be understood as attempts to answer the question: ‘What conditions doesartificial intelligence research have to satisfy before it can justly claim to have producedsomething which truly simulates a human being?’1I would like to show that, farfrom construing this question simply in terms of intelligence, the films in questiondemonstrate that far more than this is at stake, and each articulates the ‘more’ in different,but related, terms. Moreover, (...)
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  16.  41
    The Argument From Meaning to God In Buber’s I and Thou.Steven G. Smith - 1987 - International Philosophical Quarterly 27 (4):347-363.
    Buber's assertions about the relation between the self (I) and God (the Eternal You) amount to an "argument" which means reasonably to bring its audience to awareness of God. This reasoning is better understood and evaluated if it is presented in a more conventionally argumentative form than Buber gave it. The key premises are: 1) Buber's account of I-You saying as a general theory of meaning and criterion of reality, and 2) Buber's claim that You-saying in encounters with finite beings (...)
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  17. Reply to Steven Cahn’s ‘The Ethics of Teaching: A Puzzle.Rick Repetti - 2004 - APA Newsletter on Teaching Philosophy 3 (2):18-19.
    Steven Cahn posed a puzzle in this issue of the APA Newsletter on Teaching Philosophy, asking whether philosophy professors are morally obliged to reason students out of presumably irrational religious beliefs, by analogy with a hypothetical case in which a young person has been led to believe she has a magnanimous uncle who she never met but who has the wherewithal to watch over her life from afar and protect her. I responded in a nuanced manner, but basically emphasizing (...)
     
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  18.  56
    Are We Evolved Computers?: A Critical Review of Steven Pinker's How the Mind Works. [REVIEW]Selmer Bringsjord - 2001 - Philosophical Psychology 14 (2):227 – 243.
    Steven Pinker's How the mind works (HTMW) marks in my opinion an historic point in the history of humankind's attempt to understand itself. Socrates delivered his "know thyself" imperative rather long ago, and now, finally, in this behemoth of a book, published at the dawn of a new millennium, Pinker steps up to have psychology tell us what we are: computers crafted by evolution - end of story; mystery solved; and the poor philosophers, having never managed to obey Socrates' (...)
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  19.  92
    Review of Steven D. Hales' Book: Relativism and the Foundations of Philosophy. [REVIEW]Manhal Hamdo - 2018 - INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RESEARCH CULTURE SOCIETY 2 (1):200-204.
    This review is a critical evaluation of the main points of Steven D. Hales’ significant book: Relativism and the Foundations of Philosophy. To that end, I will first summarize his major line of argument pointing out to the richness and significance of the book. After that, I will argue that Hales’ account of intuition is subject to the challenge shown by some recent works written on the topic, and that it postulates a concept of knowledge that opposes Gettier’s one, (...)
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  20.  31
    Some Misunderstandings and Misinterpretations About Sociobiology and Behavior Genetics in Lifelines by Steven Rose.Stephen C. Maxson - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):898-899.
    Lifelines by Steven Rose is supposed to present a new perspective on biology replacing an emphasis on genes with one on organisms. However, much of the book is a highly biased critique of sociobiology and behavior genetics. Some of the flaws in Rose's description and depiction of these fields are presented and refuted. Also, it would appear that these aspects of the book and many others are, in fact, related more to Rose's perennial concern for the ideology, social origins (...)
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  21.  63
    An Emergent Language of Paradox: Riffs on Steven M. Rosen’s Kleinian Signification of Being.Lisa Maroski - 2017 - Cosmos and History 13 (1):315-342.
    First, I briefly recapitulate the main points of Rosen’s article, namely, that the word “Being” does not adequately signify the paradoxical unification of subject and object and that the Klein bottle can serve as a more appropriate sign -vehicle than the word. I then propose to apply his insight more widely; however, in order to do that, it is first necessary to identify infra- and exostructures of language, including culture, category structure, logic, metaphor, semantics, syntax, concept, and sign vehicles, that (...)
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  22. A Model‐Theoretic Account of Representation (or, I Don't Know Much About Art…but I Know It Involves Isomorphism).Steven French - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1472-1483.
    Discussions of representation in science tend to draw on examples from art. However, such examples need to be handled with care given a) the differences between works of art and scientific theories and b) the accommodation of these examples within certain philosophies of art. I shall examine the claim that isomorphism is neither necessary nor sufficient for representation and I shall argue that there exist accounts of representation in both art and science involving isomorphism which accommodate the apparent counterexamples and, (...)
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  23.  61
    “I Walk Weeping in Pangs of a Mothers Torment for Her Children”: Women's Laments in the Poetry and Prophecies of William Blake.Steven P. Hopkins - 2009 - Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (1):39-81.
    Cross-cultural scholarship in ritual studies on women's laments provides us with a fresh vantage point from which to consider the function of women and women's complaining voices in the epic poems of William Blake. In this essay, I interpret Thel, Oothoon, and Enitharmon as strong voices of experience that unleash some of Blake's most profound meditations on social, sexual, individual, and institutional forms of violence and injustice, offering what might aptly be called an ethics of witness. Tracing the performative function (...)
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  24. Can I Know What I Am ThInking?Steven M. Duncan - manuscript
    In this paper, I argue that, if a common form of materialism is true, I cannot know my own thoughts, or even that I am thinking. I conclude that, since I can and do know these things, materialism about mind as I characterize it must be false.
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  25.  15
    I S.Steven F. Savitt - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 50:19-24.
    Richard Arthur and I proposed that the present in Minkowski spacetime should be thought of as a small causal diamond. That is, given two timelike separated events p and q, with p earlier than q, they suggested that the present is the set I+ ∩ I-. Mauro Dorato presents three criticisms of this proposal. I rebut all three and then offer two more plausible criticisms of the Arthur/Savitt proposal. I argue that these criticisms also fail.
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  26.  39
    Steven Gross.Steven Gross - unknown
    Should a theory of meaning state what sentences mean, and can a Davidsonian theory of meaning in particular do so? Max Ko¨lbel answers both questions affirmatively. I argue, however, that the phenomena of non-homophony, non-truth-conditional aspects of meaning, semantic mood, and context-sensitivity provide prima facie obstacles for extending Davidsonian truth-theories to yield meaning-stating theorems. Assessing some natural moves in reply requires a more fully developed conception of the task of such theories than Ko¨lbel provides. A more developed conception is also (...)
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  27.  15
    Marxism, Morality and Justice: Steven Lukes.Steven Lukes - 1982 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 14:177-205.
    A paradox, according to the OED, is ‘a statement seemingly self-contradictory or absurd, though possibly well-founded or essentially true’. In this article I shall try to show that the classical orthodox Marxist view of morality is a paradox. I shall seek to resolve the paradox by trying to show that it is only seemingly self-contradictory or absurd. But I shall not claim the standard Marxist view of morality to be well-founded or essentially true. On the contrary, I shall suggest that, (...)
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  28.  16
    “I Can’T Eat If I Don’T Plass”: Impoverished Plasma Donors, Alternatives, and Autonomy.Steven Weimer - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (4):361-385.
    One of the central considerations to be taken into account in evaluating the ethics of compensation for donated plasma is respect for donor autonomy. And one of the main arguments against compensated donation systems is that many donors do or would come from circumstances of poverty that restrict their alternatives in a way that compromises those donors’ autonomy. In this paper, I develop and defend a novel version of this “compromised autonomy argument” which improves upon extant versions by employing a (...)
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  29.  8
    The Social Construction of Talent: A Defence of Justice as Reciprocity[I Would Li].Steven R. Smith - 2001 - Journal of Political Philosophy 9 (1):19-37.
    Debates concerning principles of justice need to be attentive to various types of social process. One concerns the distribution of resources between groups defined as talented and untalented. Another concerns the social mechanisms by which people come to be categorised as talented and untalented. Political philosophers have paid considerable attention to the former issues, much less to the latter. That, I shall argue, represents a significant oversight.
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  30.  43
    Reducing Implicit Racial Preferences: I. A Comparative Investigation of 17 Interventions.Calvin K. Lai, Maddalena Marini, Steven A. Lehr, Carlo Cerruti, Jiyun-Elizabeth L. Shin, Jennifer A. Joy-Gaba, Arnold K. Ho, Bethany A. Teachman, Sean P. Wojcik, Spassena P. Koleva, Rebecca S. Frazier, Larisa Heiphetz, Eva E. Chen, Rhiannon N. Turner, Jonathan Haidt, Selin Kesebir, Carlee Beth Hawkins, Hillary S. Schaefer, Sandro Rubichi, Giuseppe Sartori, Christopher M. Dial, N. Sriram, Mahzarin R. Banaji & Brian A. Nosek - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (4):1765-1785.
  31.  16
    Being-in-the-World: A Commentary on Heidegger's Being and Time, Division I by Hubert L. Dreyfus. [REVIEW]Steven Galt Crowell - 1993 - Journal of Philosophy 90 (7):373-377.
  32. Communication, Cooperation and Conflict.Steffen Borge - 2012 - ProtoSociology 29:223-241.
    According to Steven Pinker and his associates the cooperative model of human communication fails, because evolutionary biology teaches us that most social relationships, including talk-exchange, involve combinations of cooperation and conflict. In particular, the phenomenon of the strategic speaker who uses indirect speech in order to be able to deny what he meant by a speech act (deniability of conversational implicatures) challenges the model. In reply I point out that interlocutors can aim at understanding each other (cooperation), while being (...)
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  33. Book Review: I Chronicles 1–9 by Gary N. Knoppers Anchor Bible. Doubleday, New York, 2003. 514 Pp. $49.95 (Cloth). ISBN 0-385-46928-4.; I Chronicles 10–29 by Gary N. Knoppers Anchor Bible. Doubleday, New York, 2004. 531 Pp. $49.95 (Cloth). ISBN 0-385-51288-0. [REVIEW]Steven S. Tuell - 2006 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 60 (3):326-328.
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  34. Convergence Liberalism and the Problem of Disagreement Concerning Public Justification.Paul Billingham - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (4):541-564.
    The ‘convergence conception’ of political liberalism has become increasingly popular in recent years. Steven Wall has shown that convergence liberals face a serious dilemma in responding to disagreement about whether laws are publicly justified. What I call the ‘conjunctive approach’ to such disagreement threatens anarchism, while the ‘non-conjunctive’ approach appears to render convergence liberalism internally inconsistent. This paper defends the non-conjunctive approach, which holds that the correct view of public justification should be followed even if some citizens do not (...)
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  35.  81
    Perfectionist Liberalisms and the Challenge of Pluralism.Mats Volberg - 2015 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 8:113-127.
    Based on Steven Wall's work I take perfectionism in political philosophy to include two components: the objective good and the non-neutral state. Some perfectionist theories aim to be liberal. But given the objective good component perfectionism seems to be unable to accommodate the commitment to value pluralism found in liberalism, this is what I call the challenge of pluralism. The perfectionist reply is to claim that their objective good can also be plural and thus there is no conflict. My (...)
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  36.  37
    Public Reason Is Not Self-Defeating.Kevin Vallier - 2016 - American Philosophical Quarterly 53 (4):349-364.
    Steven Wall has two compelling arguments for what I shall call public reason liberalism's reflexivity requirement. The political concerns to reconcile persons who hold diverse moral views, and to avoid authoritarianism in politics not only require the public justification of coercion but the public justification of the standard used to determine when coercion is publicly justified. The reflexivity requirement is said to entail that public reason is self-defeating. Once RR is correctly formulated, however, cases of self-defeat will be rare, (...)
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  37.  53
    Buddhism as Reductionism: Personal Identity and Ethics in Parfitian Readings of Buddhist Philosophy; From Steven Collins to the Present.Oren Hanner - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):211-231.
    Derek Parfit’s early work on the metaphysics of persons has had a vast influence on Western philosophical debates about the nature of personal identity and moral theory. Within the study of Buddhism, it also has sparked a continuous comparative discourse, which seeks to explicate Buddhist philosophical principles in light of Parfit’s conceptual framework. Examining important Parfitian-inspired studies of Buddhist philosophy, this article points out various ways in which a Parfitian lens shaped, often implicitly, contemporary understandings of the anātman doctrine and (...)
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  38. Communication, Conflict and Cooperation.Steffen Borge - 2012 - ProtoSociology 29.
    According to Steven Pinker and his associates the cooperative model of human communication fails, because evolutionary biology teaches us that most social relationships, including talk-exchange, involve combinations of cooperation and conflict. In particular, the phenomenon of the strategic speaker who uses indirect speech in order to be able to deny what he meant by a speech act (deniability of conversational implicatures) challenges the model. In reply I point out that interlocutors can aim at understanding each other (cooperation), while being (...)
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  39.  93
    Can Liberal Perfectionism Justify Religious Toleration? Wall on Promoting and Respecting.Kevin Vallier - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 162 (3):645-664.
    Toleration is perhaps the core commitment of liberalism, but this seemingly simple feature of liberal societies creates tension for liberal perfectionists, who are committed to justifying religious toleration primarily in terms of the goods and flourishing it promotes. Perfectionists, so it seems, should recommend restricting harmful religious practices when feasible. If such restrictions would promote liberal perfectionist values like autonomy, it is unclear how the perfectionist can object. A contemporary liberal perfectionist, Steven Wall, has advanced defense of religious toleration (...)
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  40.  58
    We Need Progress in Ideas About How to Achieve Progress.Nicholas Maxwell - 2018 - Metascience (2).
    Steven Pinker's book Enlightenment NOW is in many ways a terrific book, from which I have learnt much. But it is also deeply flawed. Science and reason are at the heart of the book, but the conceptions that Steven Pinker defends are damagingly irrational. And these defective conceptions of science and reason, as a result of being associated with the Enlightenment Programme for the past two or three centuries, have been responsible, in part, for the genesis of the (...)
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  41.  92
    Malebranche and Occasionalism: A Reply to Steven Nadler.Desmond M. Clarke - 1995 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (3):499-504.
    In Malebranche's account of occasional causality, God exercises his general will with respect to every event that merits a causal explanation. Nadler distinguishes two pictures of God's involvement; (1) there are as many distinct acts of God's will as there are causal events to be explained; (2) God's will is exercised once only, when the natural order of causes is created. I argue that Malebranche's concept of God is inconsistent with a real distinction between God and acts of his will, (...)
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  42.  5
    The Pharmakon of ‘If’: Working with Steven Shapin's A Social History of Truth.Michael Wintroub - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Science 52 (3):487-514.
    Whilst the ‘local culture’ of experimental natural philosophy in seventeenth-century England drew on ‘resources’ supplied by the gentlemanly identity of men like Robert Boyle, this culture found much of its distinctiveness in a series of exclusions having to do with faith, gender and class. My concern in this essay is less with these exclusions, and the distinctions they enabled, than with their surreptitious returns. Following from this, as a heuristic strategy, I will try to understand how Boyle and Co. used (...)
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  43.  27
    Civic Immortality: The Problem of Civic Honor in Africa and the West.Dan Demetriou - 2015 - The Journal of Ethics 19 (3-4):257-276.
    From Thomas Hobbes to Steven Pinker, it is often remarked that cultures of honor are destabilizing and especially dangerous to liberal institutions. This essay sharpens that criticism into two objections: one saying honor cultures encourage tyranny, and another accusing them of undermining rule of law. Since these concerns manifest differently in established as opposed to fledgling liberal democracies, I appeal to Western and African examples both to motivate and allay these worries. I contend that a culture of civic honor (...)
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  44. Possibilities That Matter I: Material Possibility.Steven M. Duncan - manuscript
    This is the first of a series of four papers presenting modal logic as a branch of material, rather than merely formal, logic.
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  45.  87
    The Modern Auditory I.Steven Connor - 1997 - In Roy Porter (ed.), Rewriting the Self: Histories From the Renaissance to the Present. Routledge. pp. 203--23.
  46.  15
    Elliott Mendelson. On Non-Standard Models for Number Theory. Essays on the Foundations of Mathematics, Dedicated to A. A. Fraenkel on His Seventieth Anniversary, Edited by Y. Bar-Hillel, E. I. J. Poznanski, M. O. Rabin, and A. Robinson for The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Magnes Press, Jerusalem 1961, and North-Holland Publishing Company, Amsterdam1962, Pp. 259–268. [REVIEW]Steven Orey - 1967 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 32 (1):128.
  47.  20
    I Want to Help You, but I Am Not Sure Why: Gaze-Cuing Induces Altruistic Giving.Robert D. Rogers, Andrew P. Bayliss, Anna Szepietowska, Laura Dale, Lydia Reeder, Gloria Pizzamiglio, Karolina Czarna, Judi Wakeley, Phillip J. Cowen & Steven P. Tipper - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (2):763-777.
  48. 1. Preface Preface (Pp. I-Ii).Laura Ruetsche, Chris Smeenk, Branden Fitelson, Patrick Maher, Martin Thomson‐Jones, Bas C. van Fraassen, Steven French, Juha Saatsi, Stathis Psillos & Katherine Brading - 2006 - Philosophy of Science 73 (5).
  49.  44
    Are Strong States Key to Reducing Violence? A Test of Pinker.Ryan Murphy - 2016 - Libertarian Papers 8:311-317.
    This note evaluates the claim of Steven Pinker in The Better Angels of Our Nature that the advent of strong states led to a decline in violence. I test this claim in the modern context, measuring the effect of the strength of government in lower-income countries on reductions in homicide rates. The strength of government is measured using Polity IV, Worldwide Governance Indicators, and government consumption as a percentage of GDP. The data do not support Pinker’s hypothesis.
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  50. The Structure and Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics R. I. G. Hughes Cambridge, MA, and London: Harvard University Press, 1989, Ix + 369 Pp., US$42.50. [REVIEW]Steven F. Savitt - 1993 - Dialogue 32 (4):833-.
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