5 found
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  1. Individual Differences in Moral Behaviour: A Role for Response to Risk and Uncertainty?Colin J. Palmer, Bryan Paton, Trung T. Ngo, Richard H. Thomson, Jakob Hohwy & Steven M. Miller - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (1):97-103.
    Investigation of neural and cognitive processes underlying individual variation in moral preferences is underway, with notable similarities emerging between moral- and risk-based decision-making. Here we specifically assessed moral distributive justice preferences and non-moral financial gambling preferences in the same individuals, and report an association between these seemingly disparate forms of decision-making. Moreover, we find this association between distributive justice and risky decision-making exists primarily when the latter is assessed with the Iowa Gambling Task. These findings are consistent with neuroimaging studies (...)
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  2.  9
    Studies of Caloric Vestibular Stimulation: Implications for the Cognitive Neurosciences, the Clinical Neurosciences and Neurophilosophy.Steven M. Miller & Trung T. Ngo - 2007 - .
    Objective: Caloric vestibular stimulation has traditionally been used as a tool for neurological diagnosis. More recently, however, it has been applied to a range of phenomena within the cognitive neurosciences. Here, we provide an overview of such studies and review our work using CVS to investigate the neural mechanisms of a visual phenomenon - binocular rivalry. We outline the interhemispheric switch model of rivalry supported by this work and its extension to a metarivalry model of interocular-grouping phenomena. In addition, studies (...)
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  3.  7
    Closing in on the Constitution of Consciousness.Steven M. Miller - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  4. Binocular Rivalry and the Cerebral Hemispheres.Steven M. Miller - 2001 - Brain and Mind 2:119-149.
    In addressing the scientific study of consciousness, Crick and Koch state, “It is prob- able that at any moment some active neuronal processes in your head correlate with consciousness, while others do not: what is the difference between them?” (1998, p. 97). Evidence from electro- physiological and brain-imaging studies of binocular rivalry supports the premise of this statement and answers to some extent, the question posed. I discuss these recent developments and outline the rationale and experimental evidence for the interhemispheric (...)
     
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  5. On the Correlation/Constitution Distinction Problem (and Other Hard Problems) in the Scientific Study of Consciousness.Steven M. Miller - 2007 - Acta Neuropsychiatrica 19 (3):159-176.