7 found
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  1.  21
    Responsibility and Agency Within Alternative Food Networks: Assembling the “Citizen Consumer”. [REVIEW]Stewart Lockie - 2009 - Agriculture and Human Values 26 (3):193-201.
    With “consumer demand” credited with driving major changes in the food industry related to food quality, safety, environmental, and social concerns, the contemporary politics of food has become characterized by a variety of attempts to redefine food consumption as an expression of citizenship that speaks of collective rights and responsibilities. Neoliberal political orthodoxy constructs such citizenship in terms of the ability of individuals to monitor and regulate their own behavior as entrepreneurs and as consumers. By contrast, many proponents of alternative (...)
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  2.  19
    Private Standards, Grower Networks, and Power in a Food Supply System.Lyndal-Joy Thompson & Stewart Lockie - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):379-388.
    The role of private food standards in agriculture is increasingly raising questions of legitimacy, particularly in light of the impacts such standards may have on food producers. While much work has been carried out at a macro policy level for developing countries, there have been relatively few empirical case studies that focus on particular food supply chains, and even fewer studies still of the impact of private standards on developed countries such as Australia. This study seeks to address this imbalance, (...)
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  3.  37
    Capturing the Sustainability Agenda: Organic Foods and Media Discourses on Food Scares, Environment, Genetic Engineering, and Health. [REVIEW]Stewart Lockie - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (3):313-323.
    This paper undertakes a content analysis of newspaper articles from Australia, the UK, and the US concerned with a variety of issues relevant to sustainable food and agriculture from 1996 to 2002. It then goes on to identify the various ways in which sustainability, organic food and agriculture, genetic engineering, genetically modified foods, and food safety are framed both in their own terms and in relation to each other. It finds that despite the many competing approaches to sustainability found in (...)
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  4.  45
    Environmental and Social Risks, and the Construction of “Best-Practice” in Australian Agriculture.Stewart Lockie - 1998 - Agriculture and Human Values 15 (3):243-252.
    Amongst the environmental and social externalities generated by Australian agriculture are a number of risks both to the health and safety of communities living near sites of agricultural production, and to the end consumers of agricultural products. Responses to these potential risks – and to problems of environmental sustainability more generally – have included a number of programs to variously: define “best-practice” for particular industries; implement “Quality Assurance” procedures; and encourage the formation of self-help community “Landcare” groups. Taken together, these (...)
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  5.  19
    Constructing “Green” Foods: Corporate Capital, Risk, and Organic Farming in Australia and New Zealand. [REVIEW]Stewart Lockie, Kristen Lyons & Geoffrey Lawrence - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (4):315-322.
    Public concern over environmentalquality and food safety has culminated in thedevelopment of markets for “green” foods – foodsthat are variously construed as fresh, chemical-free,nutritious, natural, or produced in anenvironmentally-sustainable manner. Understanding theemergence of “green” foods is dependent on analysisboth of the ways in which foods are produced andprocessed, and of the meanings that are attached tothem at each stage of their production,transformation, and consumption. The notion of “green”foods is thereby understood here as a fluid andcontestable signifier that myriad actors involved (...)
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  6.  28
    Carol J. Adams. The Sexual Politics of Meat: A Feminist-Vegetarian Critical Theory, Tenth Anniversary Edition; Kathryn Paxton George. Animal, Vegetable, or Woman? A Feminist Critique of Ethical Vegetarianism; Michael Allen Fox. Deep Vegetarianism. [REVIEW]Stewart Lockie, Jen Hayward & Nell Salem - 2002 - Agriculture and Human Values 19 (4):361-363.
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  7.  24
    Jules Pretty, the Living Land: Agriculture, Food and Community Regeneration in Rural Europe. [REVIEW]Stewart Lockie - 2001 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (1):105-108.
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