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  1.  44
    Enlarging the Conversation.Stewart W. Herman - 1997 - Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (2):5-20.
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  2.  30
    How Work Gains Meaning in Contractual Time: A Narrative Model for Reconstructing the Work Ethic. [REVIEW]Stewart W. Herman - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 38 (1-2):65 - 79.
    The work ethic has been deeply challenged by two trends – the division of labor and the destruction of continuity in employment. Here a narrative model is proposed for reconstructing the work ethic. Narratives embody assumptions about the flow of time, and work becomes charged with meaning when "contractual time" is interrupted, when new functions are invented to cope with obstacles having to do human character and action. Content for this abstract model is provided by four historical movements in the (...)
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  3.  9
    Western Religious Approaches to Business Ethics.Stewart W. Herman & Arthur Gross Schaefer - 1997 - Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (2):1-156.
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  4.  17
    Returning the Corporation to Its RootsOn Moral Business: Classical and Contemporary Resources for Ethics in Economic Life.Stewart W. Herman, Max L. Stackhouse, Dennis P. McCann, Shirley J. Roels & Preston N. Williams - 1997 - Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (2):151.
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  5.  24
    Damaged Goods—or Durable? A Response to Tom McInerney.Stewart W. Herman - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (3):371-378.
    Abstract: Contrary to criticisms by Thomas McInerney,Durable Goods proposes a realistic and empirically testable “covenantal” ethic for moving management and labor beyond tactics of mutual coercion and evasion. Nonetheless, two questions asked by McInerney remain germane. First, should the moral claims of management and labor always receive equal moral consideration, as a matter of justice? To this substantive question Durable Goods admittedly provides a less than satisfactory answer. Second, can the normative theory proposed by Durable Goods, based in part as (...)
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  6.  64
    Furthering the Conversation Between Philosophy and Organization Theory.Stewart W. Herman - 1991 - Business Ethics Quarterly 1 (1):121-132.
  7.  18
    From the Truly Real to Spiritual Wisdom.Stewart W. Herman - 2001 - Spiritual Goods 2001:17-29.
    This essay sketches a method for identifying the insights that diverse religious traditions offer to the field of business ethics. Each article in this volume asserts or assumes faith-based claims about what is "truly real" as the ground of moral aspiration and obligation. Four distinct kinds of claims yield four kinds of wisdom, that is, moral guidance for business practice. 1) In Judaism and Islam, scriptural commands, as interpreted authoritatively down through these traditions, yield precise methods for rendering specific moral (...)
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  8.  6
    Job 31–41.Stewart W. Herman - 2016 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 70 (1):75-77.
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  9.  45
    Returning the Corporation to its Roots.Stewart W. Herman - 1997 - Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (2):151-156.
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  10.  33
    Spirituality, Inc.: Religion in the American Workplace, by Lake Lambert III. New York: New York University Press, 2009.Stewart W. Herman - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (3):533-537.
  11.  10
    The Modern Business Corporation and an Ethics of Trust.Stewart W. Herman - 1992 - Journal of Religious Ethics 20 (1):111-148.
    Recent theologically grounded contributions to business ethics, though innovative and promising, are flawed by an unrealistic conception of human agency in corporate settings. By drawing upon the resources of organization theory, we can construct a more reliable descriptive anthropology as a foundation for prescriptive judgments. By bringing this reconstructed knowledge into connection with the normative moral arguments of H. Richard Niebuhr, we can develop a corporate ethics of trust building that both takes organizational realities seriously and also guides their transformation.
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  12. The Rebirth of the German Church.Stewart W. Herman & Martin Niemoeller - unknown
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