Results for 'Stoicism'

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  1. Stoicism.Dirk Baltzly - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Stoicism was one of the new philosophical movements of the Hellenistic period. The name derives from the porch (stoa poikilê) in the Agora at Athens decorated with mural paintings, where the members of the school congregated, and their lectures were held. Unlike ‘epicurean,’ the sense of the English adjective ‘stoical’ is not utterly misleading with regard to its philosophical origins. The Stoics did, in fact, hold that emotions like fear or envy (or impassioned sexual attachments, or passionate love of (...)
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  2.  39
    Stoicism (as Emotional Compression) Is Emotional Labor.Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò - 2020 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 6 (2).
    The criticism of “traditional,” “toxic,” or “patriarchal” masculinity in both academic and popular venues recognizes that there is some sense in which the character traits and tendencies that are associated with masculinity are structurally connected to oppressive, gendered social practices and patriarchal social structures. One important theme of criticism centers on the gender distribution of emotional labor, generally speaking, but this criticism is also particularly meaningful in the context of heterosexual romantic relationships. I begin with the premise that there is (...)
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  3.  79
    Stoicism.Massimo Pigliucci - 2016 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Stoicism Stoicism originated as a Hellenistic philosophy, founded in Athens by Zeno of Citium, c. 300 B.C.E. It was influenced by Socrates and the Cynics, and it engaged in vigorous debates with the Skeptics, the Academics, and the Epicureans. It moved to Rome where it flourished during the period of the Empire, … Continue reading Stoicism →.
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  4.  51
    Stoicism.Sellars John - 2017 - Encyclopedia of Renaissance Philosophy.
    An overview of Stoicism in the Renaissance, c. 1350 to c. 1650.
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  5. Stoicism: A Very Short Introduction.Brad Inwood - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    Stoicism is two things: a long past philosophical school of ancient Greece and Rome, and an enduring philosophical movement that still inspires people in the twenty-first century to re-think and re-organize their lives in order to achieve personal satisfaction. Brad Inwood presents the long history that connects these.
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  6.  93
    Stoicism: Traditions and Transformations.Steven K. Strange & Jack Zupko (eds.) - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Stoicism is now widely recognised as one of the most important philosophical schools of ancient Greece and Rome. But how did it influence Western thought after Greek and Roman antiquity? The question is a difficult one to answer because the most important Stoic texts have been lost since the end of the classical period, though not before early Christian thinkers had borrowed their ideas and applied them to discussions ranging from dialectic to moral theology. Later philosophers became familiar with (...)
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  7.  50
    Stoicism.John Sellars - 2006 - Acumen Publishing.
    This book provides a lucid, comprehensive introduction to this great philosophical school.
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  8. Scepticism, Stoicism and Subjectivity: Reappraising Montaigne's Influence on Descartes.Jesús Navarro - 2010 - Contrastes: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 15 (1-2):243-260.
    According to the standard view, Montaigne’s Pyrrhonian doubts would be in the origin of Descartes’ radical Sceptical challenges and his cogito argument. Although this paper does not deny this influence, its aim is to reconsider it from a different perspective, by acknowledging that it was not Montaigne’s Scepticism, but his Stoicism, which played the decisive role in the birth of the modern internalist conception of subjectivity. Cartesian need for certitude is to be better understood as an effect of the (...)
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  9. Stoicism in Berkeley's Philosophy.Stephen H. Daniel - 2011 - In Bertil Belfrage & Timo Airaksinen (eds.), Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 121-34.
    Commentators have not said much regarding Berkeley and Stoicism. Even when they do, they generally limit their remarks to Berkeley’s Siris (1744) where he invokes characteristically Stoic themes about the World Soul, “seminal reasons,” and the animating fire of the universe. The Stoic heritage of other Berkeleian doctrines (e.g., about mind or the semiotic character of nature) is seldom recognized, and when it is, little is made of it in explaining his other doctrines (e.g., immaterialism). None of this is (...)
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  10. Stoicism and the Scottish Enlightenment.Christian Maurer - 2016 - In John Sellars (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Stoic Tradition. Routledge. pp. 254-269.
  11.  72
    Shaftesbury, Stoicism, and Philosophy as a Way of Life.John Sellars - 2016 - Sophia 55 (3):395-408.
    This paper examines Shaftesbury’s reflections on the nature of philosophy in his Askêmata notebooks, which draw heavily on the Roman Stoics Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius. In what follows, I introduce the notebooks, outline Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy therein, compare it with his discussions of the nature of philosophy in his published works, and conclude by suggesting that Pierre Hadot’s conception of ‘philosophy as a way of life’ offers a helpful framework for thinking about Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy.
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  12.  85
    Grotius, Stoicism and 'Oikeiosis'.Christopher Brooke - 2008 - Grotiana 29 (1):25-50.
    For thirty years now there has been considerable debate concerning the foundations of modern natural law theory, with Richard Tuck emphasising the role self-preservation plays in anchoring Grotius's system and his critics pointing to the contribution of a principle of sociability. With reference to recent contributions in the literature on Stoicism from Julia Annas, A. A. Long and Tad Brennan, I argue that Grotius's use of the outline of Stoic ethics from Book III of Cicero's De finibus is crucial (...)
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  13.  90
    Stoicism, Cosmopolitanism, and the Legacy of European Imperialism.Anthony Pagden - 2000 - Constellations 7 (1):3-22.
  14. Stoicism & Emotion.Margaret R. Graver - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
    On the surface, stoicism and emotion seem like contradictory terms. Yet the Stoic philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome were deeply interested in the emotions, which they understood as complex judgments about what we regard as valuable in our surroundings. Stoicism and Emotion shows that they did not simply advocate an across-the-board suppression of feeling, as stoicism implies in today’s English, but instead conducted a searching examination of these powerful psychological responses, seeking to understand what attitude toward (...)
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  15.  35
    Stoicism in the Renaissance From Petrarch to Lipsius.Jill Kraye - 2001 - Grotiana 22 (1):21-45.
  16.  50
    Stoicism and Food.William O. Stephens - 2018 - Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics.
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  17. Stoicism and Epicureanism.Christopher Gill - 2009 - In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oxford University Press.
     
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  18.  27
    The Stoicism of Epictetus: Twentieth Century Perspectives.Jackson Hershbell - 1987 - In Wolfgang Haase (ed.), Philosophie, Wissenschaften, Technik. Philosophie. De Gruyter. pp. 2148-2163.
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  19.  45
    Nietzsche Contra Stoicism: Naturalism and Value, Suffering and Amor Fati.James A. Mollison - 2019 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 62 (1):93-115.
    ABSTRACTNietzsche criticizes Stoicism for overstating the significance of its ethical ideal of rational self-sufficiency and for undervaluing pain and passion when pursuing an unconditional acceptance of fate. Apparent affinities between Stoicism and Nietzsche’s philosophy, especially his celebration of self-mastery and his pursuit of amor fati, lead some scholars to conclude that Nietzsche cannot advance these criticisms without contradicting himself. In this article, I narrow the target and scope of Nietzsche’s complaints against Stoicism before showing how they follow (...)
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  20.  12
    Stoicism and Roman Example: Seneca and Tacitus in Jacobean England.John H. M. Salmon - 1989 - Journal of the History of Ideas 50 (2):199-225.
  21.  44
    Stoicism, Science and Divination.R. J. Hankinson - 1988 - Apeiron 21 (2):123 - 160.
  22.  48
    The Neo-Stoicism of Radical Environmentalism.Jim Cheney - 1989 - Environmental Ethics 11 (4):293-325.
    Feminist analysis has eonvineed me that certain tendencies within that form of radical environmentalism known as deep ecology-with its supposed rejection of the Western ethical tradition and its adoption of what looks to be a feminist attitude toward the environment and our relationship to nature-constitute one more chapter in the story of Western alienation from nature. In this paper I deepen my critique of these tendencies toward alienation within deep ecology by historicizing my critique in the light of a development (...)
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  23.  63
    Early Stoicism and Akrasia.Richard Joyce - 1995 - Phronesis 40 (3):315-335.
  24.  33
    The Art of Retrieval: Stoicism?C. Kavin Rowe - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (4):706-719.
    ABSTRACTThis essay argues that retrieving insights from the ancient Stoic philosophers for Christian ethics is much more difficult than is often assumed and, further, that the “ethics of retrieval” is itself something worth prolonged reflection. The central problem is that in their ancient sense both Christianity and Stoicism are practically dense patterns of reasoning and mutually incompatible forms of life. Coming to see this clearly requires the realization that the encounter between Stoicism and Christianity is a conflict of (...)
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  25.  51
    Stoicism in Modern Thought.Moorhouse F. X. Millar - 1928 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 3 (3):446-478.
  26.  77
    A New Stoicism.Lawrence C. Becker - 1998 - Princeton University Press.
    The question addressed by this book is what, if anything, stoic ethics would be like today if stoicism had had a continuous history to the present day as a plausible and coherent set of philosophical commitments and methods. The book answers that question by arguing that most of the ancient doctrines of Stoic ethics remain defensible today, at least when ancient Stoicism's cosmological commitments are replaced by modern scientific ones.
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  27.  26
    Adam Smith, Stoicism and Religion in the 18th Century.P. H. Clarke - 2000 - History of the Human Sciences 13 (4):49-72.
    This article explores the influence of Stoicism and religion on Adam Smith. While other commentators have argued either that the main influence on Smith was Stoicism or that it was religion, the two influences have not been explicitly linked. In this article I attempt to make such a link, arguing that Smith can be seen as belonging to the strand of Christian Stoicism chiefly associated with his teacher, Francis Hutcheson. Finally, some comments are made about the implications (...)
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  28.  26
    Philosophic Pride: Stoicism and Political Thought From Lipsius to Rousseau.Christopher Brooke - 2012 - Princeton University Press.
    Surveying this large field with more amplitude and exactitude than anything else on offer, this book will be important for scholars of the humanities and specialists.
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  29.  26
    Hutcheson's Relation to Stoicism in the Light of His Moral Psychology.Christian Maurer - 2010 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):33-49.
    Without questioning Hutcheson's general affinities with the Stoics, this article focuses on two important differences in moral psychology that show the limits of the appropriation of Stoicism in Hutcheson's ethics of benevolence. First, Hutcheson's distinction between calm affections and violent passions does not fully match with the Stoic distinction between constantiæ and perturbationes, since the emotion of sorrow remains in Hutcheson's table of the calm affections. As far as sorrow as a public affection is concerned, this first point is (...)
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  30. Stoicism and Slavery in the Roman Empire.C. E. Manning - 1987 - In Wolfgang Haase (ed.), Philosophie, Wissenschaften, Technik. Philosophie. De Gruyter. pp. 1518-1544.
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  31.  22
    4. Stoicism as a Way of Life.John M. Cooper - 2012 - In Pursuits of Wisdom: Six Ways of Life in Ancient Philosophy From Socrates to Plotinus. Princeton University Press. pp. 144-225.
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  32.  7
    Neo-Stoicism and the Transition to Modernity in Wilhelm Dilthey's Philosophy of History.Larry Frohman - 1995 - Journal of the History of Ideas 56 (2):263-287.
  33. Problems in Stoicism.A. A. Long (ed.) - 1971 - Athlone Press.
    The original publication was an important spur to the subsequent renewal of interest in the study of stoicism, and is here reprinted not only because literature on the subject is still scarce, but because it has continued to be heavily referred to long after it had gone out of print. The ten essays were presented at a seminar at the University of London. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR.
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  34.  11
    The Neo-Stoicism of Radical Environmentalism.Jim Cheney - 1989 - Environmental Ethics 11 (4):293-325.
    Feminist analysis has eonvineed me that certain tendencies within that form of radical environmentalism known as deep ecology-with its supposed rejection of the Western ethical tradition and its adoption of what looks to be a feminist attitude toward the environment and our relationship to nature-constitute one more chapter in the story of Western alienation from nature. In this paper I deepen my critique of these tendencies toward alienation within deep ecology by historicizing my critique in the light of a development (...)
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  35.  19
    Stoicism, Slavery, and Law Grotian Jurisprudence and Its Reception.John W. Cairns - 2001 - Grotiana 22 (1):197-231.
  36.  34
    Moral Naturalism in Stoicism and Daoism.Jiyuan Yu - 2016 - Philosophical Inquiry 40 (1-2):95-112.
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  37.  18
    A New Stoicism.Paula Gottlieb & Lawrence C. Becker - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (1):92.
    The aim of Becker’s book is to bring stoicism up to date and to defend a contemporary stoic ethical theory against the prejudices of the skeptical modern reader. Becker imagines what would have happened if stoicism had had a continuous history from ancient times to the present. Since the stoics are thoroughgoing naturalists, according to Becker, they would have incorporated the insights of modern biology and psychology into their theory. They would have abandoned their teleological view of the (...)
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  38.  6
    The Stoicism of Marcus Aurelius.Elizabeth Asmis - 1987 - In Wolfgang Haase (ed.), Philosophie, Wissenschaften, Technik. Philosophie. De Gruyter. pp. 2228-2252.
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  39. The Two Faces of Stoicism: Rousseau and Freud.Amélie Rorty - 1996 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):335-356.
    The Two Faces of Stoicism: Rousseau and Freud AMI~LIE OKSENBERG RORTY Nor do the Stoics mean that the soul of their wisest man resists the first visions and sudden fantasies that surprise [him]: but [he] rather consents that, as it were to a natural subjection, he yields .... So likewise in other passions, always provided his opinions remain safe and whole, and.., his reason admit no tainting or alteration, and he in no whit consents to his fright and sufferance. (...)
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  40. Stoicism in the Apostle Paul: A Philosophical Reading.Troels Engberg-Pedersen - 2004 - In Steven K. Strange & Jack Zupko (eds.), Stoicism: Traditions and Transformations. Cambridge University Press. pp. 52--75.
     
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  41.  6
    Early Stoicism and the Problem of its Systematic Form.J. R. Mattingly - 1939 - Philosophical Review 48 (3):273-295.
  42.  13
    Stoicism: Some Reflections on the State of the Art.John M. Rist - 1985 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (S1):1-11.
  43.  14
    Studies in Stoicism.P. A. Brunt & Michael Crawford - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Studies in Stoicism contains six unpublished and seven republished essays, the latter incorporating additions and changes which Brunt wished to be made. The papers have been integrated and arranged in chronological order by subject matter, with an accessible lecture to the Oxford Philological Society serving as Brunt's own introduction.
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  44. Stoicism at War: From Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius to James Stockdale.Konrad Banicki - 2015 - In Tadeusz Marian Ostrowski, Iwona Sikorska & Krzysztof Gerc (eds.), Resilience and Health in a Fast-Changing World. Jagiellonian University Press. pp. 47-58.
    The chapter is devoted to the analysis of ancient Stoic philosophy as a source of resilience for soldiers. At first, some historical cases are investigated, from a Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius to more recent instances from Vietnam and Iraq. Secondly, in turn, the Epictetus' distinction between the controllable and the uncontrollable is introduced with the focus on the prescription to assign value only to the former as the Stoic source of resilience. Finally, some further questions are briefly addressed including the (...)
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  45. Soul and Body in Stoicism.A. A. Long - 1982 - Phronesis 27 (1):34-57.
  46.  48
    God and Cosmos in Stoicism.Ricardo Salles (ed.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    This is a collective study, in nine new essays, of the close connection between theology and cosmology in Stoic philosophy.
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  47.  46
    Stoicism and its Influence.Robert Mark Wenley - 1963 - New York: Cooper Square Publishers.
  48.  61
    Cynicism and Stoicism.Christopher Gill - 2013 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter discusses the ethical theories of Cynics and Stoics. Cynicism traces its origins to Diogenes of Sinope, the most colourful and outrageous of all such founders of philosophical movements. The core Cynic doctrines articulate the principles embodied in Diogenes' way of life. The central theme is that of following nature, understood as leading a life of extreme primitiveness or self-chosen bestiality. Stoicism offers an alternative to Aristotle, who has been the main Classical source of inspiration for those evolving (...)
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  49.  8
    Stoicism, the Physician, and Care of Medical Outliers.Thomas J. Papadimos - 2004 - BMC Medical Ethics 5 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundMedical outliers present a medical, psychological, social, and economic challenge to the physicians who care for them. The determinism of Stoic thought is explored as an intellectual basis for the pursuit of a correct mental attitude that will provide aid and comfort to physicians who care for medical outliers, thus fostering continued physician engagement in their care.DiscussionThe Stoic topics of good, the preferable, the morally indifferent, living consistently, and appropriate actions are reviewed. Furthermore, Zeno's cardinal virtues of Justice, Temperance, Bravery, (...)
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  50. Thoreau's Emotional Stoicism.Rick Anthony Furtak - 2003 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 17 (2):122-132.
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