Results for 'Stoics'

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  1.  49
    The Roman Stoics: Self, Responsibility, and Affection.Gretchen J. Reydams-Schils - 2005 - University of Chicago Press.
    Roman Stoic thinkers in the imperial period adapted Greek doctrine to create a model of the self that served to connect philosophical ideals with traditional societal values. The Roman Stoics-the most prominent being Marcus Aurelius-engaged in rigorous self-examination that enabled them to integrate philosophy into the practice of living. Gretchen Reydams-Schils's innovative new book shows how these Romans applied their distinct brand of social ethics to everyday relations and responsibilities. The Roman Stoics reexamines the philosophical basis that instructed (...)
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  2.  52
    Hellenistic Philosophy: Stoics, Epicureans, Sceptics.A. A. Long - 1974 - University of California Press.
    The purpose of this book is to trace the main developments in Greek philosophy during the period which runs from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.c. to the end of the Roman Republic. These three centuries, known to us as the Hellenistic Age, witnessed a vast expansion of Greek civilization eastwards, following Alexander's conquests; and later, Greek civilization penetrated deeply into the western Mediterranean world assisted by the political conquerors of Greece, the Romans. But philosophy throughout this (...)
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  3. The Stoics Reader: Selected Writings and Testimonia.Brad Inwood & Lloyd P. Gerson (eds.) - 2008 - Hackett Pub. Co..
    Lives of the stoics (Zeno, Aristo, Herillus, Cleanthes, Sphaerus, Chrysippus) on philosophy -- Logic and theory of knowledge -- Perception, knowledge, and sceptical attack -- The stoic-academic debate and Cicero's testimony -- Conceptions and rationality -- Physics -- Theology -- Bodily and non-bodily realities -- Structures and powers -- The soul -- Fate -- Ethics -- The general account in Diogenes Lartius -- The account preserved by Stobaeus -- The account in Cicero on goals -- Other evidence for stoic (...)
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  4.  53
    The Stoics on Identity, Identification, and Peculiar Qualities.Tamer Nawar - 2017 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):113-159.
    In this paper, I clarify some central aspects of Stoic thought concerning identity, identification, and so-called peculiar qualities (qualities which were seemingly meant to ground an individual’s identity and enable identification). I offer a precise account of Stoic theses concerning the identity and discernibility of individuals and carefully examine the evidence concerning the function and nature of peculiar qualities. I argue that the leading proposal concerning the nature of peculiar qualities, put forward by Eric Lewis, faces a number of objections, (...)
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  5.  66
    The Cambridge Companion to the Stoics.Brad Inwood (ed.) - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    This unique volume offers an odyssey through the ideas of the Stoics in three particular ways: first, through the historical trajectory of the school itself and its influence; second, through the recovery of the history of Stoic thought; third, through the ongoing confrontation with Stoicism, showing how it refines philosophical traditions, challenges the imagination, and ultimately defines the kind of life one chooses to lead. A distinguished roster of specialists have written an authoritative guide to the entire philosophical tradition. (...)
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  6. The Stoics on Ambiguity.Catherine Atherton - 1993 - Cambridge University Press.
    Stoic work on ambiguity represents one of the most innovative, sophisticated and rigorous contributions to philosophy and the study of language in western antiquity. This book is both a comprehensive survey of the often difficult and scattered sources, and an attempt to locate Stoic material in the rich array of contexts, ancient and modern, which alone can guarantee full appreciation of its subtlety, scope and complexity. The comparisons and contrasts which this book constructs will intrigue not just classical scholars, and (...)
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  7. Aristotle, Kant, and the Stoics: Rethinking Happiness and Duty.Stephen Engstrom & Jennifer Whiting (eds.) - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    This major collection of essays offers the first serious challenge to the traditional view that ancient and modern ethics are fundamentally opposed. In doing so, it has important implications for contemporary ethical thought, as well as providing a significant re-assessment of the work of Aristotle, Kant and the Stoics. The contributors include internationally recognised interpreters of ancient and modern ethics. Four pairs of essays compare and contrast Aristotle and Kant on deliberation and moral development, eudaimonism, self-love and self-worth, and (...)
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  8. Post-Hellenistic Philosophy: A Study of its Development From the Stoics to Origen.George Boys-Stones - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    This book traces, for the first time, a revolution in philosophy which took place during the early centuries of our era. It reconstructs the philosophical basis of the Stoics' theory that fragments of an ancient and divine wisdom could be reconstructed from mythological traditions, and shows that Platonism was founded on an argument that Plato had himself achieved a full reconstruction of this wisdom, and that subsequent philosophies had only regressed once again in their attempts to "improve" on his (...)
     
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  9. Stoics, Epicureans and Sceptics: An Introduction to Hellenistic Philosophy.R. W. Sharples - 1996 - Routledge.
    The Hellenistic philosophers and schools of philosophy are emerging from the shadow of Plato and Aristotle and are increasingly studied for their intrinsic philosophical value. They are not only interesting in their own right, but also form the intellectual background of the late Roman Republic. This study gives a comprehensive and readable account of the principal doctrines of the Stoics, Epicureans and various sceptical traditions from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. to around 200 A.D. Discussions (...)
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  10.  50
    Plotinus and the Stoics: A Preliminary Study. Graeser - 1972 - Leiden: Brill.
    Among those in question, Aristotle 6 and the Peripatetics, the Stoics and also the Epicureans,7 were the main opponents 8 to For a good account of the ...
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  11. Propositional Perception: Phantasia, Predication and Sign in Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics.Jeffrey Barnouw - 2002 - University Press of America.
    The early Greek Stoics were the first philosophers to recognize the object of normal human perception as predicative or propositional in nature. Fundamentally we do not perceive qualities or things, but situations and things happening, facts. To mark their difference from Plato and Aristotle, the Stoics adopted phantasia as their word for perception.
     
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  12.  50
    How Boots Befooled the King: Wisdom, Truth, and the Stoics.Sarah Wright - 2012 - Acta Analytica 27 (2):113-126.
    Abstract Can the wise person be fooled? The Stoics take a very strong view on this question, holding that the wise person (or sage) is never deceived and never believes anything that is false. This seems to be an implausibly strong claim, but it follows directly from some basic tenets of the Stoic cognitive and psychological world-view. In developing an account of what wisdom really requires, I will explore the tenets of the Stoic view that lead to this infallibilism (...)
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  13.  87
    The Art of Living: The Stoics on the Nature and Function of Philosophy.John Sellars - 2003 - Ashgate.
    Questioning the premise that philosophy can only be conceived as a rational discourse, Sellars presents it instead as an art (techne) that combines both 'logos' ...
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  14. Spinoza and the Stoics: Power, Politics and the Passions.Firmin DeBrabander - 2007 - Continuum.
  15. Dialecticians and Stoics on the Classification of Propositions.Theodor Ebert - 1993 - In Klaus Döring & Theodor Ebert (eds.), Dialektiker und Stoiker. Zur Logik der Stoa und ihrer Vorläufer. Stuttgart: Steiner Verlag. pp. 111-127.
    This paper discusses the reports in Diogenes Laertius and in Sextus Empiricus concerning the classification of propositions. It is argued that the material in Sextus uses a source going back to the Dialectical school whose most prominent members were Diodorus Cronus and Philo of Megara. The material preserved in Diogenes Laertius, on the other hand, goes back to Chrysippus.
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  16.  44
    Aristotle and the Stoics.F. H. SANDBACH - 1985 - Cambridge Philological Society.
  17.  23
    The Stoics.F. H. Sandbach - 1975 - Hackett Pub. Co..
  18.  56
    The Stoics on Fate and Freedom.Tim O'Keefe - 2016 - In Meghan Griffith, Neil Levy & Kevin Timpe (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Free Will. Routledge. pp. 236-246.
    Overview of the Stoic position. Looks at the roots of their determinism in their theology, their response to the 'lazy argument' that believing that all things are fated makes action pointless, their analysis of human action and how it allows actions to be 'up to us,' their rejection of the Principle of Alternate Possibilities, their rejection of anger and other negative reactive attitudes, and their contention that submission to god's will brings true freedom.
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  19.  93
    The Stoics on Determinism and Compatibilism.Ricardo Salles - 2005 - Ashgate.
    The basis of stoic determinism (a) : everything has a cause -- The basis of stoic determinism (b) : causation is necessitating -- The threat of external determination -- Reflection and responsibility -- The three compatibilist theories of Chrysippus -- Epictetus on responsibility for unreflective action.
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  20. Lucretius and the Stoics.David J. Furley - 1966 - Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies 13 (1):13-33.
     
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  21.  15
    The Stoics.R. W. Sharples & J. M. Rist - 1980 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 100:240-241.
  22.  24
    Physics of the Stoics.Samuel Sambursky - 1959 - Princeton University Press.
  23. Modalities by Perspective: Aristotle, the Stoics and a Modern Reconstruction.Christoph Jedan - 2002 - Academia.
  24. The Stoics, Epicureans, and Sceptics.Eduard Zeller - 1870 - New York: Russell & Russell.
  25.  13
    Stoics and Their Critics on Diachronic Identity.David Sedley - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (1):24-39.
    This article is a return to a theme I first tackled in “The Stoic criterion of identity” : the Academics’ ‘Growing Argument’ and the Stoic response to its attack on diachronic identity. This time my aim is to separate out approximately five different stages of the debate between the two schools. This will be done by shifting more of the focus onto developments that seem likely to belong to the late second and/or early first century BC.
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  26. Stoics and Sceptics.Edwyn Robert Bevan - 1979 - Arno Press.
  27. Stoics and Saints Lectures on the Later Heathen Moralists, and on Some Aspects of the Life of the Mediaeval Church.James Baldwin Brown - 1893 - Maclehose.
  28. Cosmic Spiritualism Among the Pythagoreans, Stoics, Jews, and Early Christians.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2019 - In Cosmos in the Ancient World. Cambridge, UK: pp. 270-94.
    This paper traces how the dualism of body and soul, cosmic and human, is bridged in philosophical and religious traditions through appeal to the notion of ‘breath’ (πνεῦμα). It pursues this project by way of a genealogy of pneumatic cosmology and anthropology, covering a wide range of sources, including the Pythagoreans of the fifth century BCE (in particular, Philolaus of Croton); the Stoics of the third and second centuries BCE (especially Posidonius); the Jews writing in Hellenistic Alexandria in the (...)
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  29.  20
    Schopenhauer and the Stoics.Jonathan Head - 2016 - Pli: The Warwick Journal of Philosophy:90-105.
    This paper considers the largely unexplored relation between Schopenhauer’s metaphysical system of Will and the philosophical therapy offered by Stoicism. By focusing on three key texts from disparate points in Schopenhauer’s philosophical career, as well as considering live debates regarding the metaphorical nature of his thought and his soteriology, I argue that the general view of straightforward opposition between himself and the Stoics is not the correct one. Rather, there are deep parallels to be found between the therapeutic aspects (...)
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  30. The Stoics on Fallacies of Equivocation.Susanne Bobzien - 2006 - In D. Frede & B. Inwood (eds.), Language and Learning, Proceedings of the 9th Symposium Hellenisticum. Cambridge University Press.
    ABSTRACT: This paper discusses the Stoic treatment of fallacies that are based on lexical ambiguities. It provides a detailed analysis of the relevant passages, lays bare textual and interpretative difficulties, explores what the Stoic view on the matter implies for their theory of language, and compares their view with Aristotle’s. In the paper I aim to show that, for the Stoics, fallacies of ambiguity are complexes of propositions and sentences and thus straddle the realms of meaning (which is the (...)
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  31.  41
    “Emotions That Do Not Move”: Zhuangzi and Stoics on Self-Emerging Feelings.David Machek - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (4):521-544.
    This essay develops a comparison between the Stoic and Daoist theories of emotions in order to provide a new interpretation of the emotional life of the wise person according to the Daoist classic Zhuangzi 莊子, and to shed light on larger divergences between the Greco-Roman and Chinese intellectual traditions. The core argument is that both Zhuangzi and the Stoics believed that there is a peculiar kind of emotional responses that emerge by themselves and are therefore wholly natural, since they (...)
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  32. Beauty as Harmony of the Soul: The Aesthetic of the Stoics.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2012 - In Marietta Rosetto, Michael Tsianikas, George Couvalis & Maria Palaktsoglou (eds.), Proceedings of the 8th International Conference of Greek Studies 2009. Flinders University. pp. 33-42.
    Aesthetics is not an area to which the Stoics are normally understood to have contributed. I adopt a broad description of the purview of Aesthetics according to which Aesthetics pertains to the study of those preferences and values that ground what is considered worthy of attention. According to this approach, we find that the Stoics exhibit an Aesthetic that reveals a direct line of development between Plato, the Stoics, Thomas Aquinas and the eighteenth century, specifically Kant’s aesthetics. (...)
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  33.  41
    Spinoza and the Stoics.Jon Miller - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    For many years, philosophers and other scholars have commented on the remarkable similarity between Spinoza and the Stoics, with some even going so far as to speak of 'Spinoza the Stoic'. Until now, however, no one has systematically examined the relationship between the two systems. In Spinoza and the Stoics Jon Miller takes on this task, showing how key elements of Spinoza's metaphysics, epistemology, philosophical psychology, and ethics relate to their Stoic counterparts. Drawing on a wide-range of secondary (...)
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  34.  65
    Sons of the Earth: Are the Stoics Metaphysical Brutes?Katja Maria Vogt - 2009 - Phronesis 54 (2):136-154.
    In this paper, it is argued the Stoics develop an account of corporeals that allows their theory of bodies to be, at the same time, a theory of causation, agency, and reason. The paper aims to shed new light on the Stoics' engagement with Plato's Sophist . It is argued that the Stoics are Sons of the Earth insofar as, for them, the study of corporeals - rather than the study of being - is the most fundamental (...)
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  35.  63
    The Passions, Power, and Practical Philosophy: Spinoza and Nietzsche Contra the Stoics.Aurelia Armstrong - 2013 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (1):6-24.
    This article reviews the influence of Stoic thought on the development of Spinoza's and Nietzsche's ethics and suggests that although both philosophers follow the Stoics in conceiving of ethics as a therapeutic enterprise that aims at human freedom and flourishing, they part company with Stoicism in refusing to identify flourishing with freedom from the passions. In making this claim, I take issue with the standard view of Spinoza's ethics, according to which the passions figure exclusively as a source of (...)
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  36. Bodies and Their Effects: The Stoics on Causation and Incorporeals.Wolfhart Totschnig - 2013 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 95 (2):119-147.
    The Stoics offer us a very puzzling conception of causation and an equally puzzling ontology. The aim of the present paper is to show that these two elements of their system elucidate each other. The Stoic conception of causation, I contend, holds the key to understanding the ontological category of incorporeals and thus Stoic ontology as a whole, and it can in turn only be understood in the light of this connection to ontology. The thesis I defend is that (...)
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  37.  40
    The Stoics on Bodies and Incorporeals.Marcelo D. Boeri - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 54 (4):723 - 752.
    The Stoics incorporeals are "somethings" which, albeit nonexistent strictly, are subsistent. For the Stoics things truly existent are bodies. So, the question is: what role do incorporeals play in Stoic ontology? The author endeavors to demonstrate that the interpretation that incorporeals are secondary realities (bodies being the primary ones) is not consistent with Stoic philosophy as a whole. At this point the argument is that bodies and incorporeals serve to complement each other in the sense that one cannot (...)
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  38. The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates.René Brouwer - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    After Plato and Aristotle, the Stoics, from the third century BCE onwards, developed the third great classical conception of wisdom. This book offers a reconstruction of this pivotal notion in Stoicism, starting out from the two extant Stoic definitions, 'knowledge of human and divine matters' and 'fitting expertise'. It focuses not only on the question of what they understood by wisdom, but also on how wisdom can be achieved, how difficult it is to become a sage, and how this (...)
     
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  39.  41
    Aristotle, Kant, and the Stoics: Rethinking Happiness and Duty. [REVIEW]J. Dybikowski - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (1):215-218.
    Apart from the editors' introduction, the book consists of ten essays originally delivered at a conference at which Greek philosophy specialists were paired with their Kantian counterparts: John McDowell and Barbara Herman on deliberation and moral development; T. H. Irwin and Stephen Engstrom on eudaimonism; Allen Wood and Jennifer Whiting on self-love and self-worth; Christine Korsgaard and Julia Annas on moral worth and practical reason; and John Cooper and J. B. Schneewind on the Stoics and Kant.
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  40.  16
    Aristotle, Kant, and the Stoics: Rethinking Happiness and Duty.David O. Brink, Stephen Engstrom & Jennifer Whiting - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (4):576.
    This collection of essays contains revised versions of papers delivered at a conference entitled “Duty, Interest, and Practical Reason: Aristotle, Kant, and the Stoics” that was organized by Stephen Engstrom and Jennifer Whiting at the University of Pittsburgh in 1994. One of the main aims of the conference was to bring together scholars on Aristotle, the Stoics, and Kant to reevaluate the common view that Greek and Kantian ethics represent fundamentally opposed conceptions of ethical theory and the roles (...)
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  41.  38
    Post-Hellenistic Philosophy: A Study of Its Development From the Stoics to Origen.R. W. Sharples - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (4):573-575.
    This is a relatively short but important book. Boys-Stones argues for the following : Both Platonists and Christians from the end of the first century A.D. onwards grounded the authority of a doctrine in its antiquity. Christian writers claimed that Christianity is the expression of an ancient wisdom from which both Judaism and pagan philosophy are deviations. Platonists claimed that Plato gave the fullest expression to an ancient wisdom also preserved, though less perfectly, in the supposed writings of Orpheus and (...)
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  42. The Roman Stoics: Self, Responsibility, and Affection.Gretchen Reydams-Schils - 2006 - University of Chicago Press.
    Roman Stoics of the imperial period developed a distinctive model of social ethics, one which adapted the ideal philosophical life to existing communities and everyday societal values. Gretchen Reydams-Schils’s innovative book shows how these Romans—including such philosophers as Marcus Aurelius, Seneca, Hierocles, and Epictetus—applied their distinct brand of social ethics to daily relations and responsibilities, creating an effective model of involvement and ethical behavior in the classical world. _The Roman Stoics_ reexamines the philosophical basis that instructed social practice in (...)
     
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  43.  89
    Austere Friends: The Stoics and Friendship.Glenn Lesses - 1993 - Apeiron 26 (1):57 - 75.
    Greek eudaimonists often discuss the nature and value of friendship. The prominence of such discussions results from the utility of the conception of friendship in formulating and testing central ethical doctrines. As they engage in a radical revision of ordinary ethical concepts, the Stoics challenge us to relinquish conventional beliefs about friendship. Ideal Stoic moral agents are passionless and austere. Yet, the Stoics not only contend that these relatively affectless temperaments have friends but that, in fact, friendship is (...)
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  44.  8
    Bricolage and the Purity of Traditions: Engaging the Stoics for Contemporary Christian Ethics.Elizabeth Agnew Cochran - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (4):720-729.
    ABSTRACTThis essay is a response to C. Kavin Rowe's critique of my 2011 argument that certain dimensions of Roman Stoic ethics are at work in Jonathan Edwards's moral thought. Rowe raises questions about the act of selectively retrieving ideas from a philosophical tradition to support constructive work in another tradition. I argue for the importance of acknowledging how Christian thought has been shaped by what Jeffrey Stout describes as moral bricolage, the selective retrieval of ideas from various traditions, and I (...)
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  45.  34
    Hume and Hutcheson on Cicero's ‘Proof Against the Stoics’.Jeff Edwards - 2017 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 15 (2):175-195.
    This article takes its cue from an intriguing passage in Hume's September 1739 letter to Hutcheson. After appealing to what Cicero proves ‘against the Stoics’ in book four of De finibus, Hume indicates that he and Hutcheson are in some respect opposed to one another as far as their views on virtue and moral motivation are concerned. While this may seem surprising, given the similarities between their approaches to the foundations of morals, careful analysis of Cicero's criticism of Stoic (...)
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  46.  26
    The First Wave of Feminism: Were the Stoics Feminists?L. Hill - 2001 - History of Political Thought 22 (1):13-40.
    The Hellenistic Schools of Epicureanism, Cynicism and Stoicism are considered to constitute the first, albeit modest, wave of feminism. But the question: ‘Were the Stoics Feminists?’ has attracted little attention due to a paucity of available evidence. What this paper attempts is a comprehensive treatment of the subject. In particular it addresses two distinct claims that have been made about the Stoic attitude to women. The first claim challenges the view that the Stoics were thoroughgoing feminists. The second (...)
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  47.  10
    Living in AgreementThe Cambridge Companion to the Stoics[REVIEW]Edward P. Butler - 2003 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 24 (2):147-160.
    The latest entry in the long-running series of Companions will hopefully raise the profile of Stoicism in philosophical curricula—hope, however, being a sentiment condemned by the Stoics. There is not a single area of philosophical reflection that could not be advanced by an intensive reexamination of Stoic positions and polemics. The school’s long duration in diverse habitats, molded by a succession of powerful intellects with differing facilities and preoccupations, and represented by a panoply of sources, none of which, however, (...)
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  48.  63
    Newton, Spinoza, Stoics and Others.Mark A. Kulstad - 2008 - The Leibniz Review 18:81-121.
    Starting from Leibniz’s complaint that Newton’s views seem to make God the soul of the world, this paper examines Leibniz’s critical stance more generally towards God as the soul of the world and related theses. A preliminary task is determining what the related theses are. There are more of these than might have been thought. Once the relations are established, it becomes clear how pervasive the various guises of the issue of God as the soul of the world are in (...)
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  49.  23
    The Stoics[REVIEW]E. B. F. - 1976 - Review of Metaphysics 29 (3):559-560.
    For many years Professor Sandbach, Emeritus Professor of Classics at Cambridge, lectured on the Stoics. His book—reflecting a contemporary interest in Stoicism—is most welcome, even if it is not the long and comprehensive undertaking his friends were hoping for. Even so it is deceptively short and simple, containing vast erudition and a masterly touch for evaluating sources. Sandbach begins with the life of Zeno and his influences, to put Stoicism in perspective, goes on to treat the "system," and ends (...)
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  50.  15
    Kant and the Stoics on the Emotional Life.Michael J. Seidler - 1981 - Philosophy Research Archives 7:1093-1150.
    This essay examines Kant's relationship to the Stoics with respect to the affective dimension of the moral life. Besides offering a general description and comparison of the two philosophies in this particular regard, it utilizes numerous specific Kantian references to and parallels with Stoicism to argue that his own position was, throughout its development, shaped by a growing contact with and appreciation of the Stoic view. The paper proceeds from some negative remarks of Kant about suppressing or even eliminating (...)
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