Results for 'Stress'

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  1. Ethical Decision Making in Organizations: The Role of Leadership Stress.Marcus Selart & Svein Tvedt Johansen - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (2):129 - 143.
    Across two studies the hypotheses were tested that stressful situations affect both leadership ethical acting and leaders' recognition of ethical dilemmas. In the studies, decision makers recruited from 3 sites of a Swedish multinational civil engineering company provided personal data on stressful situations, made ethical decisions, and answered to stress-outcome questions. Stressful situations were observed to have a greater impact on ethical acting than on the recognition of ethical dilemmas. This was particularly true for situations involving punishment and lack (...)
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  2.  24
    Moral Stress, Moral Climate and Moral Sensitivity Among Psychiatric Professionals.Kim Lützén, Tammy Blom, Béatrice Ewalds-Kvist & Sarah Winch - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (2):213-224.
    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between work-related moral stress, moral climate and moral sensitivity in mental health nursing. By means of the three scales Hospital Ethical Climate Survey, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire and Work-Related Moral Stress, 49 participants’ experiences were assessed. The results of linear regression analysis indicated that moral stress was determined to a degree by the work place’s moral climate as well as by two aspects of the mental health staff’s (...)
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  3.  52
    Moral Stress: Considering the Nature and Effects of Managerial Moral Uncertainty. [REVIEW]Scott J. Reynolds, Bradley P. Owens & Alex L. Rubenstein - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (4):491-502.
    To better illuminate aspects of stress that are relevant to the moral domain, we present a definition and theoretical model of “moral stress.” Our definition posits that moral stress is a psychological state born of an individual’s uncertainty about his or her ability to fulfill relevant moral obligations. This definition assumes a self-and-others relational basis for moral stress. Accordingly, our model draws from a theory of the self (identity theory) and a theory of others (stakeholder theory) (...)
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  4. The Impact of Moral Stress Compared to Other Stressors on Employee Fatigue, Job Satisfaction, and Turnover: An Empirical Investigation. [REVIEW]Kristen Bell DeTienne, Bradley R. Agle, James C. Phillips & Marc-Charles Ingerson - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):377-391.
    Moral stress is an increasingly significant concept in business ethics and the workplace environment. This study compares the impact of moral stress with other job stressors on three important employee variables—fatigue, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions—by utilizing survey data from 305 customer-contact employees of a financial institution’s call center. Statistical analysis on the interaction of moral stress and the three employee variables was performed while controlling for other types of job stress as well as demographic variables. (...)
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  5.  25
    Perception of Sentence Stress in Speech Correlates With the Temporal Unpredictability of Prosodic Features.Sofoklis Kakouros & Okko Räsänen - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (7):1739-1774.
    Numerous studies have examined the acoustic correlates of sentential stress and its underlying linguistic functionality. However, the mechanism that connects stress cues to the listener's attentional processing has remained unclear. Also, the learnability versus innateness of stress perception has not been widely discussed. In this work, we introduce a novel perspective to the study of sentential stress and put forward the hypothesis that perceived sentence stress in speech is related to the unpredictability of prosodic features, (...)
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  6.  24
    Islamic Religious Coping, Perceived Stress, and Mental Well-Being in Pakistanis.Ziasma Haneef Khan Chen, P. J. Watson & Zhuo - 2012 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 34 (2):137-147.
    Research suggests that religious beliefs may both help and hinder how Muslims cope. In a Pakistani sample, the Positive Islamic Coping, Islamic Identity, and Extra-Prayer Commitment factors from the Psychological Measure of Islamic Religiousness correlated negatively with Perceived Stress and positively with Mental Well-Being, Intrinsic Religious Orientation, and Extrinsic Personal Religious Orientation. Islamic Identity also partially mediated the negative relationship of Perceived Stress with Mental Well-Being. A Punishing Allah Reappraisal factor failed to display any evidence that it operationalized (...)
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  7. Reactive Oxygen Species as Signals That Modulate Plant Stress Responses and Programmed Cell Death.Tsanko S. Gechev, Frank Van Breusegem, Julie M. Stone, Iliya Denev & Christophe Laloi - 2006 - Bioessays 28 (11):1091-1101.
    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known as toxic metabolic products in plants and other aerobic organisms. An elaborate and highly redundant plant ROS network, composed of antioxidant enzymes, antioxidants and ROS-producing enzymes, is responsible for maintaining ROS levels under tight control. This allows ROS to serve as signaling molecules that coordinate an astonishing range of diverse plant processes. The specificity of the biological response to ROS depends on the chemical identity of ROS, intensity of the signal, sites of production, plant (...)
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  8. Reponses to Violence and Trauma: The Case of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.Gwen Adshead, Annie Bartlett & Gill Mezey - 2009 - In Annie Bartlett & Gillian McGauley (eds.), Forensic Mental Health: Concepts, Systems, and Practice. Oxford University Press.
    Chapter 9 describes and evaluates the relatively recent mental health models of the impact of trauma, and discusses the ways that traumatic events affect people, the political and cultural effects of understanding these consequences as ‘disorder’, particularly as Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and concludes by looking at the relevance of the concept of PTSD to forensic populations.
     
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  9.  23
    Do US Black Women Experience Stress-Related Accelerated Biological Aging?Arline T. Geronimus, Margaret T. Hicken, Jay A. Pearson, Sarah J. Seashols, Kelly L. Brown & Tracey Dawson Cruz - 2010 - Human Nature 21 (1):19-38.
    We hypothesize that black women experience accelerated biological aging in response to repeated or prolonged adaptation to subjective and objective stressors. Drawing on stress physiology and ethnographic, social science, and public health literature, we lay out the rationale for this hypothesis. We also perform a first population-based test of its plausibility, focusing on telomere length, a biomeasure of aging that may be shortened by stressors. Analyzing data from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN), we estimate that (...)
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  10.  30
    Stress and Hope at the Margins.Jonathan Morgan, Cara E. Curtis & Lance D. Laird - 2017 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 39 (3):205-234.
    _ Source: _Volume 39, Issue 3, pp 205 - 234 For many people across the world, experiences of depression include features that extend beyond the biopsychiatric model, which predominates in research on the relationship between religious and spiritual coping and depressive symptoms. How does attending to these diverse experiences of depression challenge our understanding of the dynamic between religiosity and depression? This paper presents thirteen qualitative interviews among economically marginalized mothers in the metro-Boston area. Analyzing these narratives presents a complex (...)
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  11.  18
    Perceived Stress as a Mediator Between Social Support, Religiosity, and Flourishing Among Older Adults.Abbas Abdollahi, Simin Hosseinian, Hassan Sadeghi & Tengku Aizan Hamid - 2018 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 40 (1):80-103.
    _ Source: _Volume 40, Issue 1, pp 80 - 103 This study was designed to examine the relationships between social support, perceived stress, religiosity, and flourishing and to test the mediating role of perceived stress in the relationships between social support and religiosity with flourishing. This study also examines the moderating roles of religiosity and gender in the relationship between social support and flourishing among 2301 Malaysian older adults. Structural Equation Modelling showed that older adults with high levels (...)
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  12.  60
    An Investigation into the Medicalization of Stress in the Twentieth Century.Elizabeth Siegel Watkins - 2014 - Medicine Studies 4 (1):29-36.
    Stress presents an interesting case for the application of medicalization theory. From the 1950s to the 1980s, stress became an established, if not fully deciphered, component of the matrix within which illness developed, as understood by physicians and patients, scientists, and laypeople alike. While the various iterations of the medicalization thesis are useful for analyzing the information flows between the multiplicity of actors engaged in the production and interpretation of the stress concept, they cannot account for all (...)
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  13.  34
    Modeling the Post-9/11 Meaning-Laden Paradox: From Deep Connection and Deep Struggle to Posttraumatic Stress and Growth.Bu Huang*, Amy L. Ai*, Terrence N. Tice** & Catherine M. Lemieux - 2011 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 33 (2):173-204.
    The prospective study follows college students after the 9/11 attacks. Based on evidence and trauma-related theories, and guided by reports on positive and negative reactions and meaning-related actions among Americans after 9/11, we explored the seemingly contradictory, yet meaning-related pathways to posttraumatic growth and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms , indicating the sense of deep interconnectedness and deep conflict. The final model showed that 9/11 emotional turmoil triggered processes of assimilation, as indicated in pathways between prayer coping and perceived spiritual (...)
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  14.  29
    Stress in Political Theory.Phillip C. Chapman - 1969 - Ethics 80 (1):38-49.
    The article attempts to give a coherent expression to a recurrent theme in the history of political theory. The theme is that men and communities must be subjected to stress in various forms (e.g., Poverty, Insecurity, Conflict, Dissension) in order to maintain whatever faculties, qualities, capabilities and institutions they regard as (a) practically necessary in the long run, or (b) an essential part of their conception of a good life. The ideas dealt with have been drawn from philosophers, political (...)
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  15.  17
    Food Provisioning Strategies, Food Insecurity, and Stress in an Economically Vulnerable Community: The Northern Cheyenne Case. [REVIEW]Erin Feinauer Whiting & Carol Ward - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (4):489-504.
    Living in poverty is associated with high levels of protracted stress associated with health problems. Economic and food insecurity are particularly poignant aspects of poverty and condition the work of securing basic daily needs of families. Recent studies suggest that levels of stress increase as family food needs rise. This paper presents new findings which clarify the relationship of food provisioning to stress levels, by examining actual food provisioning strategies and food insecurity among the Northern Cheyenne Indians (...)
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  16.  9
    Psychosocial Stress and Infertility.Samuel K. Wasser - 1994 - Human Nature 5 (3):293-306.
    Experimental, theoretical, psychological, and economic barriers have caused physicians to rely on biomedical treatments for infertility at the exclusion of more environmentally oriented ones (e.g., psychosocial stress therapy). An evolutionary model is described for the origin of reproductive failure, suggesting why mammals evolved to be reproductively responsive to the environment and why psychosocial stress should have an especially strong impact on fertility problems. A study of the causal role of psychosocial stress in infertility is then summarized. The (...)
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  17.  25
    Depression: The Predisposing Influence of Stress.Hymie Anisman & Robert M. Zacharko - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):89-99.
  18.  39
    Integrity at Work: Managing Routine Moral Stress in Professional Roles.Alan Cribb - 2011 - Nursing Philosophy 12 (2):119-127.
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  19.  9
    Adverse Childhood Experiences Run Deep: Toxic Early Life Stress, Telomeres, and Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number, the Biological Markers of Cumulative Stress.Kathryn K. Ridout, Mariam Khan & Samuel J. Ridout - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (9):1800077.
  20.  53
    The Free‐Radical Damage Theory: Accumulating Evidence Against a Simple Link of Oxidative Stress to Ageing and Lifespan.John R. Speakman & Colin Selman - 2011 - Bioessays 33 (4):255-259.
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  21.  26
    Awareness Under Anesthesia and the Development of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.Janet E. Osterman, James Hopper, William J. Heran, Terence M. Keane & Bessel A. van der Kolk - 2001 - General Hospital Psychiatry 23 (4):198-204.
  22.  22
    Towards Alzheimer's Root Cause: ECSIT as an Integrating Hub Between Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.Montserrat Soler-López, Nahuai Badiola, Andreas Zanzoni & Patrick Aloy - 2012 - Bioessays 34 (7):532-541.
  23.  7
    Stress‐Induced Mutation Via DNA Breaks in Escherichia Coli: A Molecular Mechanism with Implications for Evolution and Medicine.Susan M. Rosenberg, Chandan Shee, Ryan L. Frisch & P. J. Hastings - 2012 - Bioessays 34 (10):885-892.
  24.  21
    Medikamentöse Gedächtnismodifikation zur Prävention der Posttraumatischen Belastungsstörung: eine ethische BewertungPharmacological memory modification for post-traumatic stress disorder: an ethical analysis.Matthias Guth & Ralf J. Jox - 2014 - Ethik in der Medizin 26 (2):137-151.
    Die Posttraumatische Belastungsstörung (PTBS) ist ein schwerwiegendes psychisches Krankheitsbild, das Betroffene nach dem Erleben traumatisierender Situationen entwickeln. Im Zusammenhang mit den Auslandseinsätzen der Bundeswehr ist die PTBS bei Soldaten in den letzten Jahren verstärkt in den Fokus der deutschen Öffentlichkeit gerückt. Auch zivile Traumata bergen ein großes PTBS-Risiko. Seit einigen Jahren werden Methoden zur medikamentösen Prävention der PTBS erforscht. Die beiden wichtigsten Ansätze, die Prävention mit zentralnervös wirkenden Betablockern und Glukokortikoiden, basieren auf der Idee, durch den Eingriff in neuroendokrine Stressachsen (...)
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  25.  22
    Male-Female Differences in Effects of Parental Absence on Glucocorticoid Stress Response.Mark V. Flinn, Robert J. Quinlan, Seamus A. Decker, Mark T. Turner & Barry G. England - 1996 - Human Nature 7 (2):125-162.
    This study examines the family environments and hormone profiles of 316 individuals aged 2 months-58 years residing in a rural village on the east coast of Dominica, a former British colony in the West Indies. Fieldwork was conducted over an eight-year period (1988–1995). Research methods and techniques include radioimmunoassay of cortisol and testosterone from saliva samples (N=22,340), residence histories, behavioral observations of family interactions, extensive ethnographic interview and participant observation, psychological questionnaires, and medical examinations.Analyses of data indicate complex, sex-specific effects (...)
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  26. Potential Benefits of Canine Companionship for Military Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.Allegro L. Johnson, Denise Pride, D. Allen Donahue, Stephen L. Stern, John P. Hatch, Sybil Allison, Alan L. Peterson, Trisha A. Benson, Carlos Moreno, Matthew D. Jeffreys & Cynthia L. Lancaster - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (6):568-581.
    Investigators surveyed 30 U.S. military veterans with PTSD who reported having benefited from living with a dog. The subject population included men and women aged 34 to 67, with a mean of 56.9 years, who were being treated at two Department of Veterans Affairs outpatient clinics. Participants received a questionnaire packet designed to assess aspects of their mental and physical health and relationship with a canine companion, which they completed at home and returned either in person or by mail. The (...)
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  27.  2
    Posttraumatic Stress in Organizations: Types, Antecedents, and Consequences.Scott David Williams & Jonathan Williams - 2020 - Business and Society Review 125 (1):23-40.
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  28.  8
    Phosphatidylinositol 5-Phosphate: A Nuclear Stress Lipid and a Tuner of Membranes and Cytoskeleton Dynamics.Julien Viaud, Frédéric Boal, Hélène Tronchère, Frédérique Gaits-Iacovoni & Bernard Payrastre - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (3):260-272.
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  29.  18
    Early Life Stress and Telomere Length: Investigating the Connection and Possible Mechanisms.Idan Shalev - 2012 - Bioessays 34 (11):943-952.
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  30.  28
    Stress E Estratégias de Coping Em Crianças E Adolescentes Em Contexto Escolar.Raquel Catarina Proença Raimundo & Maria Alexandra Penedo Marques Pinto - 2006 - Aletheia 24:09-19.
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  31.  24
    Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis for Non‐Critically Ill Patients on a Teaching Service.Kevin O. Hwang, Sanja Kolarov, Lee Cheng & Rebecca A. Griffith - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (5):716-721.
  32.  13
    Judgment of Time as a Function of Serial Position and Stress.John L. Falk & Dalbir Bindra - 1954 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (4):279.
  33.  34
    Effects of Failure Stress Upon Skilled Performance.Richard S. Lazarus & Charles W. Eriksen - 1952 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 43 (2):100.
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  34.  12
    Glycogen at the Crossroad of Stress Resistance, Energy Maintenance, and Pathophysiology of Aging.Ivan Gusarov & Evgeny Nudler - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (9):1800033.
    Glycogen is synthesized and stored to maintain postprandial blood glucose homeostasis and to ensure an uninterrupted energy supply between meals. Although the regulation of glycogen turnover has been well studied, the effects of glycogen on aging and disease development have been largely unexplored. In Caenorhabditis elegans fed a high sugar diet, glycogen potentiates resistance to oxidants, but paradoxically, shortens lifespan. Depletion of glycogen by oxidants or inhibition of glycogen synthesis extends the lifespan of worms by an AMPK‐dependent mechanism. Thus, glycogen (...)
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  35.  28
    Anxiety (Drive), Stress, and Serial-Position Effects in Serial-Verbal Learning.Charles D. Spielberger & Lou H. Smith - 1966 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (4):589.
  36.  12
    Stress‐Induced Depression: Is Social Rank a Predictive Risk Factor?Thomas Larrieu & Carmen Sandi - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (7):1800012.
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  37.  26
    "The Relationship Under Stress Between Changes in Skin Temperature, Electrical Skin Resistance, and Pulse Rate": Erratum.Lawrence M. Baker & William M. Taylor - 1955 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 49 (4):300-300.
  38.  23
    Stress, coping e adaptação na transição para o segundo ciclo de escolaridade: efeitos de um programa de intervenção.Karla Sandy de Leça Correia & Maria Alexandra Marques Pinto - 2008 - Revista Aletheia 27:07-22.
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  39.  23
    Anxiety, Anxiety Reduction, and Stress in Learning.James Deese, Richard S. Lazarus & James Keenan - 1953 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 46 (1):55.
  40.  6
    Recall of Completed and Incompleted Activities Under Varying Degrees of Stress.Alfred F. Glixman - 1949 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (3):281.
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  41.  7
    Effects of Shock-Induced Stress on Verbal Performance.W. Dean Chiles - 1958 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (2):159.
  42.  18
    The Relationship Under Stress Between Changes in Skin Temperature, Electrical Skin Resistance, and Pulse Rate.Lawrence M. Baker & William M. Taylor - 1954 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 48 (5):361.
  43.  18
    Use of Temperature Stress with Cool Air Reinforcement for Human Operant Conditioning.Gordon L. Paul, Charles W. Eriksen & Lloyd G. Humphreys - 1962 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (4):329.
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  44.  12
    Experimental Studies in Affective Processes: I. Some Effects of Cognitive Structure and Active Participation on Certain Autonomic Reactions During and Following Experimentally Induced Stress.E. A. Haggard - 1943 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 33 (4):257.
  45.  18
    SAPs as Novel Regulators of Abiotic Stress Response in Plants.Jitender Giri, Prasant K. Dansana, Kamakshi S. Kothari, Gunjan Sharma, Shubha Vij & Akhilesh K. Tyagi - 2013 - Bioessays 35 (7):639-648.
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  46.  19
    Anxiety and Stress in Learning: The Role of Intraserial Duplication.Richard S. Lazarus, James Deese & Robert Hamilton - 1954 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (2):111.
  47.  17
    Effects of Stress and Anxiety on Performance of a Complex Verbal-Coding Task.Leon T. Katchmar, Sherman Ross & T. G. Andrews - 1958 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (6):559.
  48.  8
    Proactive Interference and Facilitation as a Function of Amount of Training and Stress.David S. Palermo - 1957 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 53 (5):293.
  49.  9
    Psychomotor Performance as a Function of Amount of Training and Stress.Alfred Castaneda & David S. Palermo - 1955 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 50 (3):175.
  50.  3
    The pronunciation of vowels with secondary stress in English.Quentin Dabouis - 2018 - Corela. Cognition, Représentation, Langage 16.
    Peu d’études se sont concentrées sur la prononciation des voyelles sous accent secondaire en anglais. Dans le cadre de l’approche introduite par Guierre, cet article propose une étude empirique large de ces voyelles et se concentre sur trois catégories clés de mots : les mots non-dérivés, les constructions contenant un préfixe sémantiquement transparent et les dérivés suffixaux. Dans leur ensemble, les analyses précédentes fondées sur le rang, les domaines phonologiques et l’isomorphisme dérivationnel sont confirmées mais certains phénomènes mis à jour (...)
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