8 found
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  1. Long-Term Trajectories of Human Civilization.Seth D. Baum, Stuart Armstrong, Timoteus Ekenstedt, Olle Häggström, Robin Hanson, Karin Kuhlemann, Matthijs M. Maas, James D. Miller, Markus Salmela, Anders Sandberg, Kaj Sotala, Phil Torres, Alexey Turchin & Roman V. Yampolskiy - 2019 - Foresight 21 (1):53-83.
    Purpose This paper aims to formalize long-term trajectories of human civilization as a scientific and ethical field of study. The long-term trajectory of human civilization can be defined as the path that human civilization takes during the entire future time period in which human civilization could continue to exist. -/- Design/methodology/approach This paper focuses on four types of trajectories: status quo trajectories, in which human civilization persists in a state broadly similar to its current state into the distant future; catastrophe (...)
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  2. Racing to the precipice: a model of artificial intelligence development.Stuart Armstrong, Nick Bostrom & Carl Shulman - 2016 - AI and Society 31 (2):201-206.
  3. Thinking Inside the Box: Controlling and Using an Oracle AI.Stuart Armstrong, Anders Sandberg & Nick Bostrom - 2012 - Minds and Machines 22 (4):299-324.
    There is no strong reason to believe that human-level intelligence represents an upper limit of the capacity of artificial intelligence, should it be realized. This poses serious safety issues, since a superintelligent system would have great power to direct the future according to its possibly flawed motivation system. Solving this issue in general has proven to be considerably harder than expected. This paper looks at one particular approach, Oracle AI. An Oracle AI is an AI that does not act in (...)
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  4.  9
    The Technological Singularity: Managing the Journey.Stuart Armstrong, Victor Callaghan, James Miller & Roman Yampolskiy (eds.) - 2017 - Berlin, Heidelberg: Imprint: Springer.
    This volume contains a selection of authoritative essays exploring the central questions raised by the conjectured technological singularity. In informed yet jargon-free contributions written by active research scientists, philosophers and sociologists, it goes beyond philosophical discussion to provide a detailed account of the risks that the singularity poses to human society and, perhaps most usefully, the possible actions that society and technologists can take to manage the journey to any singularity in a way that ensures a positive rather than a (...)
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  5.  81
    Thinking inside the box: Using and controlling an oracle AI.Stuart Armstrong, Anders Sandberg & Nick Bostrom - forthcoming - Minds and Machines.
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  6. The technological singularity.Jim Miller, Roman Yampolskiy, Stuart Armstrong & Vic Callaghan (eds.) - 2015
    "The idea that human history is approaching a singularity - that ordinary humans will someday be overtaken by artificially intelligent machines or cognitively enhanced biological intelligence, or both - has moved from the realm of science fiction to serious debate. Some singularity theorists predict that if the field of artificial intelligence continues to develop at its current dizzying rate, the singularity could come about in the middle of the present century. Murray Shanahan offers an introduction to the idea of the (...)
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  7.  11
    Who Knows Anything about Anything about AI?Stuart Armstrong & Seán ÓhÉigeartaigh - 2014-08-11 - In Russell Blackford & Damien Broderick (eds.), Intelligence Unbound. Wiley. pp. 46–60.
    This chapter provides a classification scheme for artificial intelligence (AI) predictions, and tools for analyzing their reliability and uncertainties. It presents a series of brief case studies of some of the most famous AI predictions: the initial Dartmouth AI conference; Hubert Dreyfus' criticism of AI; Ray Kurzweil's predictions in The Age of Spiritual Machines; and Stephen Omohundro's AI Drives. The chapter takes every falsifiable statement about future AI to be a prediction. Thus the following four categories are all predictions: Timelines (...)
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  8.  17
    Periodicity of nocturnal feeding in the rat: What the gut tells the brain or what the brain tells the gut.Stuart Armstrong - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (4):575-576.