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Stuart Brock [20]Stuart Ross Brock [1]
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Stuart Brock
Victoria University of Wellington
  1. Moral Fictionalism and Religious Fictionalism.Richard Joyce & Stuart Brock (eds.) - 2024 - Oxford University Press.
    Atheism is a familiar kind of skepticism about religion. Moral error theory is an analogous kind of skepticism about morality, though less well known outside academic circles. Both kinds of skeptic face a "what next?" question: If we have decided that the subject matter (religion/morality) is mistaken, then what should we do with this way of talking and thinking? The natural assumption is that we should abolish the mistaken topic, just as we previously eliminated talk of, say, bodily humors and (...)
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  2. Fictionalism about fictional characters.Stuart Brock - 2002 - Noûs 36 (1):1–21.
    Despite protestations to the contrary, philosophers have always been renowned for espousing theories that do violence to common-sense opinion. In the last twenty years or so there has been a growing number of philosophers keen to follow in this tradition. According to these philosophers, if a story of pure fic-tion tells us that an individual exists, then there really is such an individual. According to these realists about fictional characters, ‘Scarlett O’Hara,’ ‘Char-lie Brown,’ ‘Batman,’ ‘Superman,’ ‘Tweedledum’ and ‘Tweedledee’ are not (...)
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  3. The creationist fiction: The case against creationism about fictional characters.Stuart Brock - 2010 - Philosophical Review 119 (3):337-364.
    This essay explains why creationism about fictional characters is an abject failure. Creationism about fictional characters is the view that fictional objects are created by the authors of the novels in which they first appear. This essay shows that, when the details of creationism are filled in, the hypothesis becomes far more puzzling than the linguistic data it is used to explain. No matter how the creationist identifies where, when and how fictional objects are created, the proposal conflicts with other (...)
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  4.  24
    Realism and Anti-Realism.Stuart Brock & Edwin David Mares - 2006 - Routledge.
    There are a bewildering variety of ways the terms "realism" and "anti-realism" have been used in philosophy and furthermore the different uses of these terms are only loosely connected with one another. Rather than give a piecemeal map of this very diverse landscape, the authors focus on what they see as the core concept: realism about a particular domain is the view that there are facts or entities distinctive of that domain, and their existence and nature is in some important (...)
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  5. Modal fictionalism: A response to Rosen.Stuart Brock - 1993 - Mind 102 (405):147-150.
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  6. The Ubiquitous Problem of Empty Names.Stuart Brock - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy 101 (6):277-298.
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  7.  79
    A Recalcitrant Problem for Abstract Creationism.Stuart Brock - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (1):93-98.
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  8.  31
    Fictional Objects.Stuart Brock & Anthony Everett (eds.) - 2015 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Eleven original essays discuss a range of puzzling philosophical questions about fictional characters, and more generally about fictional objects. For example, they ask questions like the following: Do they really exist? What would fictional objects be like if they existed? Do they exist eternally? Are they created? Who by? When and how? Can they be destroyed? If so, how? Are they abstract or concrete? Are they actual? Are they complete objects? Are they possible objects? How many fictional objects are there? (...)
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  9. The Puzzle of Imaginative Failure.Stuart Brock - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):443-463.
    The Puzzle of Imaginative Failure asks why, when readers are invited to do so, they so often fall short of imagining worlds where the moral facts are different. This is puzzling because we have no difficulty imagining worlds where the descriptive facts are different. Much of the philosophical controversy revolves around the question of whether the reader's lack of imagination in such cases is a result of psychological barriers (an inability or a difficulty on the reader's part to imagine what (...)
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  10.  35
    The Phenomenological Objection to Fictionalism.Stuart Brock - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (3):574-592.
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  11. Fictionalism About Fictional Characters Revisited.Stuart Brock - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (2):377-403.
    Fictionalism about fictional characters is a view according to which all claims ostensibly about fictional characters are in fact claims about the content of a story. Claims that appear to refer to or quantify over fictional objects contain an implicit prefix of the form “according to such-and-such story. In.
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  12. The paradox paradox.Stuart Brock & Joshua Glasgow - 2022 - Synthese 200 (2):1-7.
    In this paper we argue that our conception of and intuitions about paradoxes are themselves paradoxical. Specifically, we argue that our commitment to the existence and nature of paradoxes is inconsistent with a norm of rationality—which is a paradox.
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  13.  22
    A critical introduction to fictionalism.Fred Kroon, Jonathan McKeown-Green & Stuart Brock - 2018 - New York, NY: Bloomsbury Academic. Edited by Stuart Brock & Arthur Jonathan McKeown-Green.
    A Critical Introduction to Fictionalism provides a clear and comprehensive understanding of an important alternative to realism. Drawing on questions from ethics, the philosophy of religion, art, mathematics, logic and science, this is a complete exploration of how fictionalism contrasts with other non-realist doctrines and motivates influential fictionalist treatments across a range of philosophical issues. Defending and criticizing influential as well as emerging fictionalist approaches, this accessible overview discuses physical objects, universals, God, moral properties, numbers and other fictional entities. Where (...)
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  14.  8
    Is Philosophy Progressing Fast Enough?Stuart Brock - 2017-04-27 - In Russell Blackford & Damien Broderick (eds.), Philosophy's Future. Wiley. pp. 119–131.
    Is there enough progress in philosophy? It is notable that even within the discipline, opinions are divided. Optimists think there is more than enough progress in philosophy. Pessimists think we could and should do better. In this chapter I defend an optimistic answer to this question.
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  15. Fictionalism, fictional characters, and fictionalist inference.Stuart Brock - 2015 - In Stuart Brock & Anthony Everett (eds.), Fictional Objects. Oxford University Press.
     
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  16.  82
    The Phenomenological Objection to Fictionalism.Stuart Brock - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):574-592.
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  17. Fictions, feelings, and emotions.Stuart Brock - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 132 (2):211 - 242.
    Many philosophers suggest (1) that our emotional engagement with fiction involves participation in a game of make-believe, and (2) that what distinguishes an emotional game from a dispassionate game is the fact that the former activity alone involves sensations of physiological and visceral disturbances caused by our participation in the game. In this paper I argue that philosophers who accept (1) should reject (2). I then illustrate how this conclusion illuminates various puzzles in aesthetics and the philosophy of mind.
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  18.  29
    Time in Fiction, by Craig Bourne and Emily Caddick Bourne: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, pp. xvi + 263, £40.Stuart Brock - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (1):204-205.
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  19.  26
    The Prospects for If-Thenism.Stuart Brock & Richard Joyce - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (2):113-114.
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  20.  64
    Lying, Misleading, and What Is Said: an Exploration in Philosophy of Language and in Ethics, by Saul Jennifer Mather: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, pp. xii + 146, £30.00. [REVIEW]Stuart Brock - 2013 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (4):831-832.
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