28 found
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  1.  5
    “When the Fall Is All There Is…”: Refocusing on the Critical (Unique?) Characteristic of “Dying” in Physician Aid-in-Dying.Stuart G. Finder & Virginia L. Bartlett - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):43-46.
    Volume 19, Issue 10, October 2019, Page 43-46.
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  2.  13
    Lessons Learned From Nurses’ Requests for Ethics Consultation.Virginia L. Bartlett & Stuart G. Finder - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301666087.
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  3.  17
    Discovering What Matters: Interrogating Clinician Responses to Ethics Consultation.Stuart G. Finder & Virginia L. Bartlett - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (4):267-276.
    Against the background assumptions that knowing what clinical ethics consultation represents to those with whom ethics consultants work most closely is a necessary component for being responsible in the practice of ethics consultation, and the complexities of soliciting and understanding colleague evaluations require another inherent responsibility for the methods by which ethics consultations are evaluated, in this article we report our experience soliciting, analyzing, and trying to understand retrospective evaluations of our Clinical Ethics Consultation Service. These evaluations were collected through (...)
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  4.  41
    Responsibility After the Apparent End: 'Following-Up' in Clinical Ethics Consultation.Stuart G. Finder & Mark J. Bliton - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (7):413-424.
    Clinical ethics literature typically presents ethics consultations as having clear beginnings and clear ends. Experience in actual clinical ethics practice, however, reflects a different characterization, particularly when the moral experiences of ethics consultants are included in the discussion. In response, this article emphasizes listening and learning about moral experience as core activities associated with clinical ethics consultation. This focus reveals that responsibility in actual clinical ethics practice is generated within the moral scope of an ethics consultant's activities as she or (...)
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  5.  14
    Experience and Ethics at the “Cutting Edge”: Lessons From Maternal–Fetal Surgery for Uterine Transplantation.Virginia L. Bartlett, Mark J. Bliton & Stuart G. Finder - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (7):29-31.
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  6.  57
    Traversing Boundaries: Clinical Ethics, Moral Experience, and the Withdrawal of Life Supports.Mark J. Bliton & Stuart G. Finder - 2002 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (3):233-258.
    While many have suggested that to withdraw medical interventions is ethically equivalent to withholding them, the moral complexity of actually withdrawing life supportive interventions from a patient cannot be ignored. Utilizing interplay between expository and narrative styles, and drawing upon our experiences with patients, families, nurses, and physicians when life supports have been withdrawn, we explore the changeable character of boundaries in end-of-life situations. We consider ways in which boundaries imply differences – for example, between cognition and performance – and (...)
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  7.  18
    Just a Collection of Recollections: Clinical Ethics Consultation and the Interplay of Evaluating Voices.Virginia L. Bartlett, Mark J. Bliton & Stuart G. Finder - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (4):301-320.
    Despite increased attention to the question of how best to evaluate clinical ethics consultations and emphasis on external evaluation, there has been little sustained focus on how we, as clinicians, make sense of and learn from our own experiences in the midst of any one consultation. Questions of how we evaluate the request for, unfolding of, and conclusion of any specific ethics consultation are often overlooked, along with the underlying question of whether it is possible to give an accurate account (...)
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  8.  26
    Activities, Not Rules: The Need for Responsive Practice (On the Way Toward Responsibility).Stuart G. Finder & Mark J. Bliton - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):52-54.
    (2001). Activities, Not Rules: The Need for Responsive Practice (On the Way Toward Responsibility) The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 1, No. 4, pp. 52-54.
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  9.  16
    Even Stranger Still: Moral Experience as a Significant Focus for Research Ethics Consultation.Stuart G. Finder - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):22 – 23.
  10.  16
    Interplays of Reflection and Text: Telling the Case.Stuart G. Finder & Mark J. Bliton - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):56-57.
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  11.  33
    Strange, but Not Stranger: The Peculiar Visage of Philosophy in Clinical Ethics Consultation. [REVIEW]Mark J. Bliton & Stuart G. Finder - 1999 - Human Studies 22 (1):69-97.
    Baylis, Tomlinson, and Hoffmaster each raise a number of critiques in response to Bliton's manuscript. In response, we focus on three themes we believe run through each of their critiques. The first is the ambiguity between the role of ethics consultation within an institution and the role of the actual ethics consultant in a particular situation, as well as the resulting confusion when these roles are conflated. We explore this theme by revisiting the question of What's going on? in clinical (...)
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  12.  36
    The Eclipse of the Individual in Policy.Mark J. Bliton & Stuart G. Finder - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (4):519.
    Several inquires about healthcare over the past several decades have shown that the evolution of healthcare practices exhibit their own microcosm of local and political influences. Likewise, other studies have shown clearly the ways in which both external and internal institutional factors establish the sectors within which healthcare is delivered. Although restrictions have always been present in some form, it seems obvious that whatever the precise form of healthcare delivery that results from current changes in its organization, there are going (...)
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  13.  13
    Vulnerability in Human Subject Research: Existential State, Not Category Designation.Stuart G. Finder - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):68-70.
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  14.  12
    Responsibility in Actual Practice.Stuart G. Finder & Mark J. Bliton - 2008 - In D. Micah Hester (ed.), Ethics by Committee: A Textbook on Consultation, Organization, and Education for Hospital Ethics Committees. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 79.
  15.  36
    Potential Subjects' Responses to an Ethics Questionnaire in a Phase I Study of Deep Brain Stimulation in Early Parkinson's Disease.Stuart G. Finder, Mark J. Bliton, Chandler E. Gill, Thomas L. Davis, Peter E. Konrad & P. D. Charles - 2012 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (3):207-216.
    Background Central to ethically justified clinical trial design is the need for an informed consent process responsive to how potential subjects actually comprehend study participation, especially study goals, risks, and potential benefits. This will be particularly challenging when studying deep brain stimulation and whether it impedes symptom progression in Parkinson’s disease, since potential subjects will be Parkinson’s patients for whom deep brain stimulation will likely have therapeutic value in the future as their disease progresses.Method As part of an expanded informed (...)
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  16.  20
    Should Competent Patients or Their Families Be Able to Refuse to Allow an HEC Case Review? No.Stuart G. Finder - 1995 - HEC Forum 7 (1):51-53.
  17.  45
    Guest Editorial.Richard M. Zaner, Mark J. Bliton & Stuart G. Finder - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (4):480.
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  18.  38
    Pragmatic Bioethics.Stuart G. Finder - 2003 - International Studies in Philosophy 35 (4):367-369.
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  19.  32
    Conceptualization and Assessment of Vulnerability in a Complex International Alzheimer's Research Study.Stanley Korenman, Stuart G. Finder & John M. Ringman - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (4):87-89.
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  20.  10
    Death, Devices, and Double Effect.Stuart G. Finder & Michael Nurok - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (1):63-73.
    Along with the growing utilization of the total artificial heart comes a new set of ethical issues that have, surprisingly, received little attention in the literature: How does one apply the criteria of irreversible cessation of circulatory function given that a TAH rarely stops functioning on its own? Can one appeal to the doctrine of double effect as an ethical rationale for turning off a TAH given that this action directly results in death? And, On what ethical grounds can a (...)
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  21.  23
    Accountability and the Clinical Practice of Ethics Consultation: Roles, Activities, and the Experience of Doing.Stuart G. Finder & Mark J. Bliton - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (6):52-53.
  22.  40
    Is Consent Necessary for Ethics Consultation?Stuart G. Finder - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (4):384.
    Is consent necessary prior to the initiation of a specific clinical ethics consultation? This is not a question that has received much attention despite the fact that the issue of consent is one of the earliest considerations associated with bioethics. Perhaps this is because of how clinical ethics consultation, as a formidable clinical practice, came into being. Specifically, although the place and time of its conception is not readily identifiable, it is not unreasonable to say it was born on March (...)
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  23.  8
    An Actual Advance in Advance Directives: Moving From Patient Choices to Patient Voices in Advance Care Planning.Virginia L. Bartlett & Stuart G. Finder - 2018 - Asian Bioethics Review 10 (1):21-36.
    Since the concept of the living wills emerged nearly 50 years ago, there have been practical challenges in translating the concept of an advance directive into documents that are clinically useful across various healthcare settings and among different patient populations and cultures. Especially, challenging has been the reliance in most ADs on pre-selected “choices” about specific interventions which either revolve around broad themes or whether or not to utilize particular interventions, both of which about most laypersons know little and, more (...)
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  24.  18
    Pertinent Roles and Experiences of All Authors.Stuart G. Finder - 1999 - Human Studies 22 (1):5-6.
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  25.  12
    Community, Context, and the Contrasting Roles of Clinicians and Researchers: Challenges Raised by Statutory Rape.Stuart G. Finder & Stanley Korenman - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (10):55-57.
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  26. Fortitude and Community: Response to Yee and Ford.Stuart G. Finder & Mark J. Bliton - 2012 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (3):221-223.
    We revisit questions about the scientific status of the pilot Phase I study of deep brain stimulation in early stage Parkinson’s disease , as well as questions about enrolling and retaining subjects. In doing so, we highlight a compelling ethical dimension reported to us by patients thinking about becoming research subjects in that study.
     
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  27. Medical Discourse and Ethical Perspective: An Investigation of Physician-Physician Dialogue.Stuart G. Finder - 1991 - Dissertation, The University of Utah
    There are at least two fundamental questions in medical ethics: What constitutes the ethical components associated with medical practice?; and How are these components realized in daily medical practice? This dissertation is concerned with question . In particular, focus is on daily medical linguistic practices of physicians. Due to the entailment of question in question , however, a brief answer for is also provided. Specifically, it is argued that a tripartite theoretical ethical framework is associated with medical practice, consisting of (...)
     
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  28.  1
    Peer Review, Peer Education, and Modeling in the Practice of Clinical Ethics Consultation: The Zadeh Project.Stuart G. Finder & Mark J. Bliton (eds.) - 2018 - Springer Verlag.
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