Results for 'Sublation'

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  1.  24
    The Image of, or in, Sublation.Ignaz Cassar - 2010 - Philosophy of Photography 1 (2):201-215.
    Following thinkers of the archive such as Derrida, Foucault and Groys, among others, one of the ethical functions of the archive is to enable differentiation: to do archival work is to unlock difference. Yet how is one to deem the archival content outside of those moments in which we deliberately engage with it? More specifically, how is one to think the spectatorial relation to images that, assigned to the sequestered space of the archive, remain most of the time without spectators?In (...)
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  2.  20
    Marx’s Sublation of Philosophy Into Praxis.Hiram Caton - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 26 (2):233 - 259.
    It will be argued here that Marx returned to Hegel in a Hegelian spirit—with the intention of achieving the sublation of philosophy. The term has the same broad meaning for both thinkers. The abolition of philosophy occurs in a philosophic way only when its negation is shown to follow from its inner tendency. The negative result is therefore also positive; it is the fulfillment of philosophy. This movement occurs in the Hegelian system in the form of the sublation (...)
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  3. Africa: Universalization as Sublation of Globalism?as Sublation Of Globalism - 2002 - Dialogue and Universalism 12.
     
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  4.  68
    Jurgen Habermas' Turn to a "Post-Secular Society": From Sublation of the Sacred to Translation of the Sacred.Adrian Nicolae Atanasescu - 2019 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (4):113.
    In this article I place Jurgen Habermas' recent turn to a "post-secular society" in the context of his previous defence of a "postmetaphysical" view of modernity. My argument is that the concept of "postsecular" introduces significant normative tensions for the formal and pragmatic view of reason defended by Habermas in previous work. In particular, the turn to a "post-secular society" threatens the evolutionary narrative that Habermas espoused in The Theory of Communicative Action, The Philosophical Discourse of Modernity or Postmetaphysical Thinking, (...)
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  5. What Does Sublation of Moral Consciousness Mean for the Philosophical Practice? On Institutional Dimension of Therapy in Hegel’s Philosophy.Rastko Jovanov - 2015 - In Lydia Amir Aleksandar Fatić (ed.), Practicing Philosophy. Cambridge Scholars Press.
  6. The Equilibration of the Self and the Sense of Sublation: Spirituality in Thought, Music, and Meditation.Ed Dale - 2012 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 33 (3-4).
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  7.  31
    Self-Completing Skepticism: On Hegel's Sublation of Pyrrhonism.Miles Hentrup - 2018 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):105-123.
    In his 1802 article for the Critical Journal, “Relationship of Skepticism to Philosophy,” Hegel attempts to articulate a form of skepticism that is “at one with every true philosophy.” Focusing on the priority that Hegel gives to ancient skepticism over its modern counterpart, Michael Forster and other commentators suggest that it is Pyrrhonism that Hegel views as one with philosophy. Since Hegel calls attention to the persistence of dogmatism even in the work of Sextus Empiricus, however, I argue that it (...)
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  8.  78
    Notion and Reality: Hegel's Sublation of the Metaphysical Notion of Truth.Michael Theunissen - 2002 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 23 (2):3-34.
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  9.  2
    Hegel's Concept of Sublation: A Critical Interpretation.Ralph Palm - 2009 - Dissertation, KU Leuven
    INTRODUCTION 1 GENERAL REMARKS 1 OUTLINE OF THE PROJECT 5 PART I: STRUCTURE 8 CHAPTER 1: DEFINITIONS 8 A. POSITIVE DEFINITIONS 8 Remark: On Translating Aufheben 13 B. NEGATIVE DEFINITIONS 15 1. Negation 16 2. Synthesis 18 3. Irony 21 CHAPTER 2: USAGE 24 A. FREQUENCY 24 Table 1. Number of Occurrences of the Various Forms 26 Table 2. Summary of the Information on the Different Volumes 26 Table 3. Results of the Regression Analysis 29 B. SYNTAX 35 C. CONTEXT (...)
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  10. The Spirit as the Subject Carrying Out the Sublation of Nature.Gilles Marmasse - 2009 - Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 59:19-31.
    In this paper, I will try to propose a general characterisation of the spirit in Hegel's Encyclopaedia. This characterisation is based on the opposition between nature and spirit. More precisely, in my view the Hegelian spirit can be defined as the activity of bringing the natural exteriority back to a living totality.
     
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  11. Sublation of Idealism in Later Philosophy of Schelling, Fwj.M. Theunissen - 1976 - Philosophisches Jahrbuch 83 (1):1-29.
     
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  12.  10
    The Spirit as the Subject Carrying Out the Sublation of Nature.Gilles Marmasse - 2009 - Hegel Bulletin 30 (1-2):19-31.
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  13.  14
    Locating Hegel's Aufhebung and Tracing Lonergan's ‘Sublation’.Gordon Rixon - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 57 (3):492-510.
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  14.  8
    The German Ideology and the Sublation of Idealism: On the Salutary Persistence of Hegelian Metaphysics.Michael Morris - 2016 - In Allegra de Laurentiis (ed.), Hegel and Metaphysics: On Logic and Ontology in the System. De Gruyter. pp. 197-212.
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  15.  5
    Democracy, Sublation, and the Scale of Values.Kenneth R. Melchin - 2007 - In David S. Liptay & John J. Liptay (eds.), The Importance of Insight: Essays in Honour of Michael Vertin. University of Toronto Press. pp. 183-196.
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  16. Contradiction and Sublation : Hegel on Dialectic.R. Singh - 1991 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 18 (3):503.
     
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  17.  6
    Hegel's Contradictions.Ralph Palm - 2011 - Hegel Bulletin 32 (1-2):134-158.
    Perhaps one of the most difficult passages in Hegel's Science of Logic is his treatment of contradiction. If each moment of Hegel's logic is understood to constitute a sort of proof and since contradiction itself is presented as a moment of the logic, then in what sense can one comprehend a proof of contradiction as such? It is difficult to formulate this in any way that does not sound fundamentally incoherent, since it is not just at odds with our ordinary (...)
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  18. The Attainment of the Absolute in Hegel’s Phenomenolog Y.Mitchell Miller - 1978 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 7 (2):195-219.
    A close reading of the final chapter of Hegel's Phenomenology, with special attention to dialectical method, to the relation of ch.s 6c on Objective Spirit and 7c on Revealed Religion to ch. 8 on Absolute Spirit, and to the relations of the absolute standpoint to time and to history.
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  19.  6
    Widerspruch und Totalität.Hans-Ernst Schiller - 2017 - Zeitschrift für Kritische Sozialtheorie Und Philosophie 4 (1-2):23-48.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Zeitschrift für kritische Sozialtheorie und Philosophie Jahrgang: 4 Heft: 1-2 Seiten: 23-48.
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  20. Dialectic: The Pulse of Freedom.Roy Bhaskar - 2008 - Routledge.
    Introduction: Critical realism, hegelian dialectic and the problems of philosophy preliminary considerations -- Objectives of the book -- Dialectic : an initial orientation -- Negation -- Four degrees of critical realism -- Prima facie objections to critical realism -- On the sources and general character of the hegelian dialectic -- On the immanent critique and limitations of the hegelian dialectic -- The fine structure of the hegelian dialectic -- Dialectic : the logic of absence, arguments, themes, perspectives, configurations -- Absence (...)
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  21. Hegel, British Idealism, and the Curious Case of the Concrete Universal.Robert Stern - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):115 – 153.
    [INTRODUCTION] Like the terms 'dialectic', 'Aufhebung' (or 'sublation'), and 'Geist', the term 'concrete universal' has a distinctively Hegelian ring to it. But unlike these others, it is particularly associated with the British strand in Hegel's reception history, as having been brought to prominence by some of the central British Idealists. It is therefore perhaps inevitable that, as their star has waned, so too has any use of the term, while an appreciation of the problematic that lay behind it has (...)
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  22. ‘Tarrying with the Negative’: Bataille and Derrida’s Reading of Negation in Hegel’s Phenomenology.Raphael Foshay - 2002 - Heythrop Journal 43 (3):295–310.
    Central to Bataille’s critique of Hegel is his reading in ‘Hegel, Death, and Sacrifice’ of ‘negation’ and of ‘lordship and bondage’ in the Phenomenology of Spirit. Whereas Hegel invokes negation as inclusive of death, Bataille points out that negation in the dynamic of lordship and bondage must of necessity be representational rather than actual. Derrida, in ‘From Restricted to General Economy’ sees in Bataille’s perspective an undercutting of the overall Hegelian project consonant with his own ongoing deconstruction of Hegelian (...). I argue that not only does Hegel fail to adequately pursue his own best advice to ‘tarry with the negative,’ but Bataille and Derrida’s critique misconstrues the relation between sublation and dialectic in Hegel’s work. I explicate Adorno’s ‘negative dialectic’ by way of alternative both to Hegelian speculative dialectic and to its Bataillean–Derridean deconstruction. (shrink)
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  23. The Movement-Image, the Time-Image and the Paradoxes of Literary and Other Modernisms.Garin Dowd - 2014 - In Understanding Deleuze, Understanding Modernism. New York, USA: Bloomsbury. pp. 90-109.
    Which modernism or modernisms circulate in Deleuze’s two-volume work on cinema? Can one meaningfully claim that both or either The Movement-Image and The Time-Image maintain connections with literary modernism? What relationship if any may be forged between theoretical debates in the areas of literary and film studies as these have been influenced by engagement with Deleuze’s work on cinema? The first obstacle to any successful negotiation of these questions lies in the absence in the books of any reference to the (...)
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  24.  75
    From Formal Subsumption to General Intellect: Elements for a Marxist Reading of the Thesis of Cognitive Capitalism.Carlo Vercellone - 2007 - Historical Materialism 15 (1):13-36.
    Since the crisis of Fordism, capitalism has been characterised by the ever more central role of knowledge and the rise of the cognitive dimensions of labour. This is not to say that the centrality of knowledge to capitalism is new per se. Rather, the question we must ask is to what extent we can speak of a new role for knowledge and, more importantly, its relationship with transformations in the capital/labour relation. From this perspective, the paper highlights the continuing validity (...)
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  25.  25
    Democratic Self-Determination Through Anarchic, Public Will-Formation.Hauke Brunkhorst - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (1-2):190-203.
    Aim is a robust theory of deliberative democracy. Therefore, three theses are explained by two historical examples, the revolution of 1848 in France, and the new social movements that emerged in the 1960s. The theses are that democratic will-formation is related internally to truth. The foundation and justification of all legal norms in public will-formation presupposes the sublation of the liberal dualism of democracy and rights and of the idealist dualism of rationality and reality in favor of a continuum (...)
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  26. El Lenguaje Como Elemento Inmanente Del Pensar y la Tesis Hegeliana de la Muerte Del Arte.Hector Ferreiro - 2011 - Kalíope 7 (14):108-122.
    The main claim of Hegel´s System is that in its inner structure reality is consubstantial with subjective reason, so that, in spite of all its eventual contradictions, reality can be understood by the human mind. However, the process of knowledge of the rationality of reality is at the same time the process of self-knowledge of the rationality that defines as such the human mind. In this general process of knowledge-self-knowledge, the different artistic forms and the different periods of the History (...)
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  27.  89
    Hegel, Derrida, and Restricted Economy: The Case of Mechanical Memory.Stephen Houlgate - 1996 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (1):79-93.
    Hegel, Derrida, and Restricted Economy: The Case of Mechanical Memory STEPHEN HOULGA'FE A GLANCE AT THE TEXTS OF Jacques Derrida and at the texts and lectures of G. W. F. Hegel indicates that Hegel and Derrida are extraordi- narily different thinkers. Hegel is clearly what Derrida would regard as a philosopher of presence, working toward the point "where knowledge no longer needs to go beyond itself, where knowledge finds itself," where con- sciousness is present to itself as it is in (...)
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  28.  26
    A Brief Discussion of Marx's Theory of Alienation.Cao Tianyu - 1984 - Chinese Studies in Philosophy 16 (1):78.
    In the article "A Few Problems Regarding the Theory of Man" , Comrade Huang Tongsen argued that Marx's theory of alienation 1) "comprehends the essence of man" from "the starting point of individual person" or "isolated, abstract individual"; 2) "turns upside down the true relationship between alienated labor and private ownership" and "sums up the problem of economic system as the alienation of man's essence"; and 3) ascribes the driving force behind alienation and sublation to "the requirement of the (...)
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  29.  64
    Antigone’s Transgression: Hegel and Bataille on the Divine and the Human.Victoria I. Burke - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (3):535-.
    I maintain that Hegel’s reading of the Antigone underestimates the power of the negativity to which Antigone’s action is dedicated. I argue that the negativity of death and the sacred cannot, contrary to Hegel, to be sublated and thus incorporated into the progression of Spirit. Bataille’s treatment of the sacred better characterizes the unworldly force and the otherness with which Antigone and Creon are confronted when their actions bring the divine and the human into conflict. Antigone’s obedience to what she (...)
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  30.  29
    In the Future Philosophy Will Be Neither Continental nor Analytic but Synthetic: Toward a Promiscuous Miscegenation of (All) Philosophical Traditions and Styles.Iain Thomson - 2012 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (2):191-205.
    In this paper, I suggest that the important philosophy of the future will increasingly be found neither in the “continental” nor in the “analytic” traditions but, instead, in the transcending sublation of (all) traditions I call “synthetic philosophy.” I mean “synthetic” both in a sense that encourages the bold combinatorial mélange of existing styles, traditions, and issues, and also in the Hegelian sense of sublating dichotomous oppositions, appropriating the distinctive insights of both sides while eliminating their errors and exaggerations, (...)
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  31.  7
    A Philosophical Relation Between Taiwan and Japan: Models of Dialectical Thought in Mou Zongsan’s and Nishida Kitaro’s Theories.Jana S. Rošker - 2019 - Asian Philosophy 29 (4):333-350.
    ABSTRACTThe article opens with a discussion of recent theoretical and methodological innovations in the field of comparative philosophy. In this regard, I propose and explain a new possible method of contrasting particular aspects of divergent philosophical texts or discourses and denote it as a ‘philosophy of sublation’. Then, the paper provides a concrete example for such a post-comparative method of reasoning, I will try to apply a ‘sublation philosophy’ approach for a reinterpretation of certain aspects of the complex (...)
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  32.  22
    Absolute Knowing: Consternation and Preservation in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit and Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida.Jennifer Ann Bates - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):65-82.
    Hegel’s “Absolute Knowing” and Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida are tragi-comic consternations. They are theatres of ethical panentheism: they present dramatic “absolute” ethical interpretations and actions, each of which is at once ungrounded and completely seeded. I start with the etymology of “consternation.” Then I discuss the comic vs. tragic interpretations of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit, arguing it is a consternating tragi-comedy. I analyze the predicate “absolute” in terms of consternations, in a few passages of the book. I elaborate especially upon (...)
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  33.  28
    Hegel and Bataille on Sacrifice.W. Ezekiel Goggin - 2018 - Hegel Bulletin 39 (2):236-259.
    In Georges Bataille’s view, the Hegelian interpretation of kenotic sacrifice as passage from Spirit to the Speculative Idea effaces the necessarily representational character of sacrifice and the irreducible non-presence of death. But Hegel identifies these aspects of death in the fragments of the 1800 System. In sacrificial acts, subjectivity represents its disappearance via the sacrificed other, and hence is negated and conserved. Sacrifice thus provides the representational model of sublation pursued in the Phenomenology as a propaedeutic to Science. Bataille’s (...)
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  34.  9
    The Absolute Not Only as Substance, but Also as Subject.Zhiang Chen - 2019 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 13 (2).
    This article intends to argue that Zizek’s dialectics is far from a vulgar progressive sublation of all reality in Concept but a systematic acknowledgement of its radical impossibility. Firstly, the fundamental point of Zizek’s dialectics is not the notion of the sublation of all immediate-material reality but a “sublation of sublation”. The conclusive of moment of a dialectical circle is the immanent act of abrogation or releasing. Then, through the elementary triad structure of the Hegelian notion (...)
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  35.  46
    The Postulate of Immortality in Kant: To What Extent is It Culturally Conditioned?Edward A. Beach - 2008 - Philosophy East and West 58 (4):pp. 492-523.
    Kant's noncognitive argument based on practical reason claims that moral considerations alone suffice to justify the idea of personal immortality as a postulate. Some recent objections are considered here that have charged him with overstepping his own distinction between phenomenon and noumenon. After examining the arguments, Kant is exonerated of having violated his own principles. More troubling, however, is the peculiarity involved in postulating an infinite progression toward a goal whose attainment, by hypothesis, would undermine the very foundations of morality (...)
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  36.  2
    Drifting Into Dangerous Waters: The Separation of Aesthetic Experience From the Work o Art.Martin Jay - 1999 - Filozofski Vestnik 20 (2).
    The elevation of aesthetic experience in the Enlightenment, most extensively developed in Kant's analysis of disinterested contemplation, to compensate for the loss of putatively objective standards of beauty had several problematic implications. One was the privileging of the subject who had the experience over the object that stimulated it. Another was the potential extension of that experience to objects that were never intended to be works of art, not merely to ones given in nature, but also to political, social and (...)
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  37.  3
    Flux Qua Gap: The Hegelian Deleuze.Xuelian He - 2020 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 14 (1).
    This essay aims to answer the question: how does Žižek reconcile Hegel’s immanence of gap with Deleuze’s immanence of flux? The contrast between the Deleuzian flux and the Hegelian gap is positivity versus negativity, externality versus internality, and virtuality versus actuality. Via Lacanian not-all, Žižek inserts Hegelian negativity into the absolute positivity of the Deleuzian univocity. In keeping up with Hegelian immanence without externality, Žižek encloses Deleuzian externality by regarding anti-Oedipus as the inner transgression of desire via the shift of (...)
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  38.  5
    Hegel, Derrida, and Restricted Economy: The Case of Mechanical Memory.Stephen Houlgate - 1996 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 34:79-93.
    Hegel, Derrida, and Restricted Economy: The Case of Mechanical Memory STEPHEN HOULGA'FE A GLANCE AT THE TEXTS OF Jacques Derrida and at the texts and lectures of G. W. F. Hegel indicates that Hegel and Derrida are extraordi- narily different thinkers. Hegel is clearly what Derrida would regard as a philosopher of presence, working toward the point "where knowledge no longer needs to go beyond itself, where knowledge finds itself," where con- sciousness is present to itself as it is in (...)
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  39. Hegels Being-Fluid in Corregidora, Blues, and (Post-)Black Aesthetics.Mandy-Suzanne Wong - 2012 - Evental Aesthetics 1 (1):85-120.
    This article offers Hegelian readings, based on his theory of fluid identity, of the blues and African-American identity. All identities, even Hegels, should be denied fixed definitions, in favor of fluid ones that allow for change and the sublation of otherness.
     
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  40.  53
    On a Resistant Strain Within the Hegelian Dialectic.Kenneth L. Schmitz - 1994 - The Owl of Minerva 25 (2):147-154.
    It is not usual to associate Hegel’s dialectic with the philosophical trend called nominalism. Nevertheless, nominalism plays an indispensable role in the modern philosophical developments leading up to Hegel’s Science of Logic. Even more, it continues its career within that logic. It would be simply absurd to label Hegel a nominalist, but the challenge posed by nominalism is not simply opposed by Hegel, i.e., it is not opposed without qualification. Of course, one never expects Hegel to confront anything directly. Instead, (...)
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  41.  10
    On the Concepts of Recognition.Ronald Mather - 2003 - Fichte-Studien 23:85-103.
    Of all the memorable, and influential, passages of the Phänomenologie des Geistes none are more famous or enjoyed greater attention than those sections devoted to the master-slave dialectic. It would seem almost inconceivable then that anything would be left to say concerning Hegel's martial struggle, the sheer number of illustrious scholars who have commented on this text bearing ample testimony to the probable redundancy of further comment. However, in actual fact, this is not the case. Indeed, it is probable that (...)
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  42.  48
    How Absolute is Hegel's Absolute Knowing?Rob Devos - 1998 - The Owl of Minerva 30 (1):33-50.
    I show first that freedom is the lever that brings about the sublation (Aufhebung) of religion into absolute knowing. Then I prove that exteriority, with its intrinsic contingency and opacity, is an essential moment of absolute knowing.
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  43.  25
    Hume's "Is-Ought" Problem: A Solution.Joseph Fitzpatrick - 2000 - New Blackfriars 81 (951):216-225.
    Hume first raised the "is-ought" problem in a famous paragraph in A Treatise of Human Nature. What is open to question is Hume's assumption that the relationship between is propositions and ought propositions in ordinary moral discussion is or is intended to be one of logical deduction. It is this assumption that I wish to address in this article. It has been challenged most powerfully by Bernard Lonergan through his notions of sublation and the four levels of consciousness.
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  44.  18
    Antigone’s Transgression: Hegel and Bataille on the Divine and the Human.Victoria I. Burke - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (3):535-546.
    Hegel’s reading of Sophocles' Antigone underestimates the power of the negativity to which Antigone’s action is dedicated. I argue that the negativity of death and the sacred cannot, contrary to Hegel, to be sublated and thus incorporated into the progression of Spirit. Bataille’s treatment of the sacred better characterizes the unworldly force and the otherness with which Antigone and Creon are confronted when their actions bring the divine and the human into conflict. Antigone’s obedience to what she understands to be (...)
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  45.  24
    Hegel and Lonergan on God.Martin J. De Nys - 2014 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (3):559-571.
    Hegel and Lonergan both make important contributions to the contemporary task of developing philosophical considerations of God within the context of a philosophy of religion. Hegel maintains that philosophy must both present knowledge of God as God is in godself, and present an account of God’s involvement with the human community. One accomplishes this two-sided task, Hegel believes, through the philosophical appropriation of the religious representation. If this appropriation is rightly understood, there is little in it to which Longern should (...)
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  46.  20
    Social Philosophy and the Logic of History.D. S. Patelis - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:571-577.
    Different conceptions of social philosophy were divided and polarized in different variants: from biological reductionism (the attempt to explain social phenomena in terms of biology) to sociocentrism. The approach V. A. Vazulin’s conception of “The Logic of History” makes it possible to concretize the dialectic of the natural (including the biological) and the social. The creative development of the method of scientific investigation made it possible to reveal the inner systematic interconnection of laws and categories of social theory which reflect (...)
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  47. Contradiction and the Language of Hegel's Dialectic: A Study of the "Science of Logic".Diego Marconi - 1980 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    Chapter VI discusses a few assumptions which underlie the proposed reconstruction of Hegel's procedures. It is shown that certain equivalents of such assumptions are either explicitly accepted by Hegel, or they are consequences of theses he subscribed to. Finally, it is suggested that some of these assumptions envisage a conception of language and philosophy which has an interesting parallel in Wittgenstein's later work. Such a conception sets philosophy sharply apart from the sciences, and deemphasizes the formation of contradictions. The general (...)
     
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  48.  4
    Hegel’s Dialectical Logic. [REVIEW]Peter Fuss - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (1):121-121.
    In this compact, well written essay Professor Bencivenga goes to great lengths to make Hegel both intelligible and plausible to a skeptical Anglo-American reader. For the most part he succeeds. First Bencivenga contrasts Aristotelian “analytic” with Hegelian “dialectical” logic. Next he demystifies Hegel’s idiosyncratic use of terms such as “concept”, “sublation,” “absolute”, “truth,” “necessity”, “spirit,” and “eternity”. In what is perhaps his exegetical capstone the author then leads his reader by the hand from a commonplace intuition of “the wholeness (...)
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  49.  17
    Hegel’s Inversion of the Tantric Buddhist, Bönpo and Stoic View of History.Elias Capriles - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:39-45.
    Hegel inverted the Tantric Buddhist, Bönpo and Stoic view of human spiritual and social evolution by presenting it as a progressive perfecting rather than as a progressive degeneration impelled by the gradual development of the basic human delusion called avidya (unawareness). Since he cancelled the crucial map /territory distinction, he had to explain change in nature as the negation of the immediately preceding state, and since he wanted spiritual and social evolution to be a process of perfecting, he had to (...)
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  50. Carolyn Bailey Gill, Ed., Maurice Blanchot: The Demand of Writing Reviewed By.Victoria I. Burke - 1997 - Philosophy in Review 17 (6):409-411.
    This volume of essays is both a useful introduction to the work Maurice Blanchot and an advanced and interesting study of this work. Well-known themes of Blanchot's thought are addressed: 'death as non-dialectical other', 'conversation as a (non) meeting place', 'the absence of any present', 'the worklessness of the work' (which rewrites G.W.F. Hegel's 'work as sublation of contradiction', and 'the impossibility of any origin'. The book divides Blanchot's oeuvre into three periods: criticism, fiction, and a more recent period (...)
     
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