Results for 'Surgical ethics'

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  1.  20
    The Nature and Limits of the Physician's Professional Responsibilities: Surgical Ethics, Matters of Conscience, and Managed Care.Laurence B. McCullough - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (1):3 – 9.
    The nature and limits of the physician's professional responsibilities constitute core topics in clinical ethics. These responsibilities originate in the physician's professional role, which was first examined in the modern English-language literature of medical ethics by two eighteenth-century British physician-ethicists, John Gregory and Thomas Percival. The papers in this annual clinical ethics number of the Journal explore the physician's professional responsibilities in the areas of surgical ethics, matters of conscience, and managed care.
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  2. Surgical Ethics.Laurence B. Mccullough, James W. Jones & Baruch A. Brody - 1998
     
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  3.  22
    Putting Surgical Ethics on the Map.John C. Moskop - 2000 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (2):199-201.
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  4.  59
    Surgical Ethics LB McCullough, JW Jones and BA Brody, New York, Oxford University Press, 1998, 396 Pages,£ 35.00 (Hb). [REVIEW]A. G. Johnson - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (2):146-146.
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  5.  11
    Surgical Ethics: L B McCullough, J W Jones and B A Brody, New York, Oxford University Press, 1998, 396 Pages, Pound35.00 (Hb). [REVIEW]P. A. G. Johnson - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (2):146-146.
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  6.  2
    Surgical Ethics[REVIEW]A. G. Johnson - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (2):146-146.
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  7.  28
    Surgical Castration, Coercion and Ethics.Jesper Ryberg & Thomas Petersen - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (9):593-594.
    John McMillan's detailed ethical analysis concerning the use of surgical castration of sex offenders in the Czech Republic and Germany is mainly devoted to considerations of coercion.1 This is not surprising. When castration is offered as an option to offenders and, at the same time, constitutes the only means by which these offenders are likely to be released from prison, it is reasonable—and close to the heart of modern medical ethics—to consider whether the offer involves some kind of (...)
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  8.  5
    Surgical Ethics: Surgical Virtue and More.Christian J. Vercler - 2015 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 5 (1):45-51.
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  9.  16
    Retraction Note To: Surgical Research and the Ethics of Being First. [REVIEW]J. Scott Isenberg - 2014 - Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (1):171-171.
    Retraction Note to: J Value Inquiry (2003) 37:195–203 DOI 10.1023/A:1025328510953This article has been retracted by the author as it was a duplication of the article "Surgical Research and the Ethics of Being First" by Isenberg JS which was published in the “Journal of the Philosophy of Surgery and Medicine” 2002; 1: 45–54.
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  10.  27
    An 'Ethics Gap' in Writing About Bioethics: A Quantitative Comparison of the Medical and the Surgical Literature.F. Paola & S. S. Barten - 1995 - Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (2):84-88.
    In order to determine whether there is a significant difference between the medical literature and the surgical literature in terms of their bioethics content, we conducted a computerized search of the MEDLINE database. The journals searched were selected from the 'Medicine' and 'Surgery' sections of the 'Brandon-Hill List', and the search was limited to 1992 issues of these journals. Three hundred and seven bioethics bibliographic records (out of a total of 11,239 articles indexed) were retrieved from the 15 medical (...)
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  11.  43
    Should a Medecal/Surgical Specialist with Formal Training in Bioethics Provide Health Care Ethics Consultation in His/Her Own Area of Speciallity?Mark Bernstein & Kerry Bowman - 2003 - HEC Forum 15 (3):274-286.
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  12.  29
    Jones, James W., Laurence B. McCullough and Bruce W. Richman. 2008. The Ethics of Surgical Practice.Carmen Paradis - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):131-133.
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  13.  87
    Research Ethics: Ethics and Methods in Surgical Trials.C. Ashton, N. Wray, A. Jarman, J. Kolman & D. Wenner - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (9):579-583.
    This paper focuses on invasive therapeutic procedures, defined as procedures requiring the introduction of hands, instruments, or devices into the body via incisions or punctures of the skin or mucous membranes performed with the intent of changing the natural history of a human disease or condition for the better. Ethical and methodological concerns have been expressed about studies designed to evaluate the effects of invasive therapeutic procedures. Can such studies meet the same standards demanded of those, for example, evaluating pharmaceutical (...)
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  14.  18
    Pediatric Ethics and the Surgical Assignment of Sex.Kenneth Kipnis & Milton Diamond - 1998 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 9:398-410.
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  15.  15
    Ethics of Surgical Training in Developing Countries.Kevin M. Ramsey & Charles Weijer - unknown
    The practice of surgical trainees operating in developing countries is gaining interest in the medical community. Although there has been little analysis about the ethical impact of these electives, there has been some concerns raised over the possible exploitation of trainees and their patients. An ethical review of this practice shows that care needs to be taken to prevent harm. Inexperienced surgeons learning surgical skills in developing countries engender greater risk of violating basic ethical principles. Advanced surgical (...)
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  16. Ethics for Surgeons: The Role of Trainees, Surgical Innovations and the Informed Consent.D. Sarin, Brij B. Agarwal & B. K. Rao - 2007 - In Laurie DiMauro (ed.), Ethics. Greenhaven Press. pp. 20--3.
     
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  17.  29
    Clinical Ethics Committee Case 15: A Case Study in Surgical Consent - Mr X's Appendix.S. J. Oultram - 2011 - Clinical Ethics 6 (3):113-116.
  18.  4
    CAE-Driven Evaluations of Surgical Fixations on Lumbar Spine: An Option for Aiding Ethics in Orthopedics.Gunti Ranga Srinivas, Malhar N. Kumar, Anindya Deb & Subrata Saha - 2014 - Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine: An International Journal 5 (4):313-322.
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  19.  2
    Mandatory HIV Testing as a Prerequisite for Surgical Procedures: Perspectives on Rights and Ethics.B. N. Joseph, A. M. Jamil, B. M. Aya, A. I. Yahya, D. A. Dangiwa, D. Jangkam & M. L. P. Dapar - 2018 - South African Journal of Bioethics and Law 11 (2):70.
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  20.  4
    Ethics of Preventive Timing and Robust Outcomes in Surgical Interventions for Anorexia Nervosa.Jessie B. DeWeese, Andre Machado & Paul J. Ford - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):75-76.
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  21.  17
    Surgical Research and the Ethics of Being First.J. Scott Isenberg - 2003 - Journal of Value Inquiry 37 (2):195-203.
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  22.  14
    Cutting to the Core: Exploring the Ethics of Contested Surgeries.Michael Benatar, Leslie Cannold, Dena Davis, Merle Spriggs, Julian Savulescu, Heather Draper, Neil Evans, Richard Hull, Stephen Wilkinson, David Wasserman, Donna Dickenson, Guy Widdershoven, Françoise Baylis, Stephen Coleman, Rosemarie Tong, Hilde Lindemann, David Neil & Alex John London - 2006 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    When the benefits of surgery do not outweigh the harms or where they do not clearly do so, surgical interventions become morally contested. Cutting to the Core examines a number of such surgeries, including infant male circumcision and cutting the genitals of female children, the separation of conjoined twins, surgical sex assignment of intersex children and the surgical re-assignment of transsexuals, limb and face transplantation, cosmetic surgery, and placebo surgery.
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  23.  12
    Strengthening the Ethical Assessment of Placebo-Controlled Surgical Trials: Three Proposals.Wendy Rogers, Katrina Hutchison, Zoë C. Skea & Marion K. Campbell - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):78.
    Placebo-controlled surgical trials can provide important information about the efficacy of surgical interventions. However, they are ethically contentious as placebo surgery entails the risk of harms to recipients, such as pain, scarring or anaesthetic misadventure. This has led to claims that placebo-controlled surgical trials are inherently unethical. On the other hand, without placebo-controlled surgical trials, it may be impossible to know whether an apparent benefit from surgery is due to the intervention itself or to the placebo (...)
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  24.  7
    Justice and Surgical Innovation: The Case of Robotic Prostatectomy.Katrina Hutchison, Jane Johnson & Drew Carter - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (7):536-546.
    Surgical innovation promises improvements in healthcare, but it also raises ethical issues including risks of harm to patients, conflicts of interest and increased injustice in access to health care. In this article, we focus on risks of injustice, and use a case study of robotic prostatectomy to identify features of surgical innovation that risk introducing or exacerbating injustices. Interpreting justice as encompassing matters of both efficiency and equity, we first examine questions relating to government decisions about whether to (...)
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  25.  26
    Surgical Innovation as Sui Generis Surgical Research.Mianna Lotz - 2013 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (6):447-459.
    Successful innovative ‘leaps’ in surgical technique have the potential to contribute exponentially to surgical advancement, and thereby to improved health outcomes for patients. Such innovative leaps often occur relatively spontaneously, without substantial forethought, planning, or preparation. This feature of surgical innovation raises special challenges for ensuring sufficient evaluation and regulatory oversight of new interventions that have not been the subject of controlled investigatory exploration and review. It is this feature in particular that makes early-stage surgical innovation (...)
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  26.  22
    Conflicts Between Parents and Health Professionals About a Child’s Medical Treatment: Using Clinical Ethics Records to Find Gaps in the Bioethics Literature.Rosalind McDougall, Lauren Notini & Jessica Phillips - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (3):429-436.
    Clinical ethics records offer bioethics researchers a rich source of cases that clinicians have identified as ethically complex. In this paper, we suggest that clinical ethics records can be used to point to types of cases that lack attention in the current bioethics literature, identifying new areas in need of more detailed bioethical work. We conducted an analysis of the clinical ethics records of one paediatric hospital in Australia, focusing specifically on conflicts between parents and health professionals (...)
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  27.  21
    Ethical Concerns Regarding Operations by Volunteer Surgeons on Vulnerable Patient Groups: The Case of Women with Obstetric Fistulas. [REVIEW]L. Lewis Wall - 2011 - HEC Forum 23 (2):115-127.
    By their very nature, overseas medical missions (and even domestic medical charities such as free clinics ) are designed to serve vulnerable populations. If these groups were capable of protecting their own interests, they would not need the help of medical volunteers: their medical needs would be met through existing government health programs or by utilizing their own resources. Medical volunteerism thus seems like an unfettered good: a charitable activity provided by well-meaning doctors and nurses who want to give of (...)
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  28.  73
    The Ethics of Sham Surgery in Parkinson's Disease: Back to the Future?Teresa Swift & Richard Huxtable - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (4):175-185.
    Despite intense academic debate in the recent past over the use of ‘sham surgery’ control groups in research, there has been a recent resurgence in their use in the field of neurodegenerative disease. Yet the primacy of ethical arguments in favour of sham surgery controls is not yet established. Preliminary empirical research shows an asymmetry between the views of neurosurgical researchers and patients on the subject, while different ethical guidelines and regulations support conflicting interpretations. Research ethics committees faced with (...)
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  29.  5
    Anesthesiological Ethics: Can Informed Consent Be Implied?Jeffrey Spike - 2012 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (1):68.
    Surgical ethics is a well-recognized field in clinical ethics, distinct from medical ethics. It includes at least a dozen important issues common to surgery that do not exist in internal medicine simply because of the differences in their practices. But until now there has been a tendency to include ethical issues of anesthesiology as a part of surgical ethics. This may mask the importance of ethical issues in anesthesiology, and even help perpetuate an unfortunate (...)
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  30.  43
    Sham Surgery: An Ethical Analysis.Franklin G. Miller - 2004 - Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (1):157-166.
    Surgical clinical trials have seldom used a “sham” or placebo surgical procedure as a control, owing to ethical concerns. Recently, several ethical commentators have argued that sham surgery is either inherently or presumptively unethical. In this article I contend that these arguments are mistaken, and that there are no sound ethical reasons for an absolute prohibition of sham surgery in clinical trials. Reflecting on three cases of sham surgery, especially on the recently reported results of a sham-controlled trial (...)
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  31.  38
    Body Integrity Identity Disorder and the Ethics of Mutilation.Robert Song - 2013 - Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (4):487-503.
    The rare phenomenon in which a person desires amputation of a healthy limb, now often termed body integrity identity disorder, raises central questions for biomedical ethics. Standard bioethical discussions of surgical intervention in such cases fail to address the meaning of bodily integrity, which is intrinsic to a theological understanding of the goodness of the body. However, moral theological responses are liable to assume that such interventions necessarily represent an implicitly docetic manipulation of the body. Through detailed attention (...)
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  32.  3
    Surgical Nurses’ Knowledge and Practices About Informed Consent.Elif Akyüz, Hülya Bulut & Mevlüde Karadağ - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2172-2184.
    Background: Informed consent involves patients being informed, in detail, of information relating to diagnosis, treatment, care and prognosis that relates to him or her. It also involves the patient explicitly demonstrating an understanding of the information and a decision to accept or decline the intervention. Nurses in particular experience problems regarding informed consent. Research question and design: This descriptive study was designed to determine nurse knowledge and practices regarding their roles and responsibilities for informed consent in Turkey. The research was (...)
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  33.  27
    Assessment of the Ethical Review Process for Non-Pharmacological Multicentre Studies in Germany on the Basis of a Randomised Surgical Trial.C. M. Seiler, P. Kellmeyer, P. Kienle, M. W. Buchler & H.-P. Knaebel - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (2):113-118.
    Objective: To examine the current ethical review process of ethics committees in a non-pharmacological trial from the perspective of a clinical investigator.Design: Prospective collection of data at the Study Centre of the German Surgical Society on the duration, costs and administrative effort of the ERP of a randomised controlled multicentre surgical INSECT Trial between November 2003 and May 2005.Setting: Germany.Participants: 18 ethics committees, including the ethics committee handling the primary approval, responsible overall for 32 clinical (...)
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  34.  8
    Reporting of Ethical Requirements in Phase III Surgical Trials.V. Bridoux, L. Schwarz, G. Moutel, F. Michot, C. Herve & J. -J. Tuech - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (10):687-690.
    Background Disclosure of obtaining informed consent from patients (ICP) and research ethics committee (REC) approval in published reports is sometimes omitted. To date, no disclosure data are available on surgical research. Objective Our aim was to assess whether REC approval and ICP were documented in surgical trials. Study design Overall, 657 randomised trials, published between 2005 and 2010 in 10 international journals, were included. We collected the report rate of REC approval and ICP and contacted the corresponding (...)
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  35.  17
    The Medical Ethics of Dr J Marion Sims: A Fresh Look at the Historical Record.L. L. Wall - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (6):346-350.
    Vesicovaginal fistula was a catastrophic complication of childbirth among 19th century American women. The first consistently successful operation for this condition was developed by Dr J Marion Sims, an Alabama surgeon who carried out a series of experimental operations on black slave women between 1845 and 1849. Numerous modern authors have attacked Sims’s medical ethics, arguing that he manipulated the institution of slavery to perform ethically unacceptable human experiments on powerless, unconsenting women. This article reviews these allegations using primary (...)
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  36.  41
    Ethics, Economics and the Regulation and Adoption of New Medical Devices: Case Studies in Pelvic Floor Surgery.Sue Ross, Charles Weijer, Amiram Gafni, Ariel Ducey, Carmen Thompson & Rene Lafreniere - 2010 - BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):14-.
    Background: Concern has been growing in the academic literature and popular media about the licensing, introduction and adoption of surgical devices before full effectiveness and safety evidence is available to inform clinical practice. Our research will seek empirical survey evidence about the roles, responsibilities, and information and policy needs of the key stakeholders in the introduction into clinical practice of new surgical devices for pelvic floor surgery, in terms of the underlying ethical principals involved in the economic decision-making (...)
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  37.  15
    Teaching Medical Ethics as a Practical Subject: Observations From Experience.A. G. Johnson - 1983 - Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (1):5-7.
    The author, head of a teaching hospital surgical unit, argues that the medical curriculum must ensure that all students are exposed to a minimum of ethical discussion and decision-making. In describing his own approach he emphasises the need to show students that it is 'an intensely practical subject'. Moreover, he reminds them that moral dilemmas in medicine--perhaps a better term than medical ethics--are unavoidable in clinical practice. Professor Johnson emphasises the need for small group teaching and discussion of (...)
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  38.  32
    Surgical Patents and Patients — the Ethical Dilemmas.Tadeusz Tołłoczko - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (1):61-69.
    It is obvious that every inventor should be rewarded for the intellectual effort, and at the same time be encouraged to successively improve his or her discovery and to work on subsequent innovations. Patents also ensure that patent owners are officially protected against intellectual piracy, but protection of intellectual property may be difficult to accomplish. Nevertheless, it all comes down to this basic question: Does a contradiction exist between medical ethics and the “Medical and Surgical Procedure Patents” system? (...)
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  39.  20
    Ethics Committees at Work: Do Not Resuscitate Orders in the Operating Room: The Birth of a Policy.Guy Micco & Neal H. Cohen - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (1):103.
    The question of whether Do Not Resuscitate orders should be sustained in the operating room was brought to our ethics committee by a pulmonologist and involved one of his patients for whom he serves as a primary care physician. His patient, a woman with chronic obstructive lung disease was electing, for comfort purposes, to have a hip pinning following a fracture. At the same time, she wished to have a DNR order covering her entire hospital stay. The anesthesiologist described (...)
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  40.  20
    The Ethics of Surgery in the Elderly Demented Patient with Bowel Obstruction.P. Gallagher - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):105-108.
    Objective: Little has been written in the medical literature concerning the ethics of treatment of the elderly demented patient with bowel obstruction. It is one example of the issues with which we are becoming increasingly involved. We conducted a survey of our colleagues' opinions to determine current practice.Design: A postal questionnaire study . Questions were posed that related to a case scenario of an elderly demented patient presenting with a presumed sigmoid volvulus.Setting: The northern region of England.Participants: Thirty seven (...)
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  41.  8
    The Practical and Ethical Defects of Surgical Randomised Prospective Trials.A. Byer - 1983 - Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (2):90-93.
    This paper presents a strong criticism of the current enthusiasm for clinical randomised prospective studies in surgery. In the process, the author probes the 'intellectualism' or lack thereof in present day surgical attitudes. The subjects are examined against a framework of ethics and inescapable dilemmas. Ways of correcting the more obvious weaknesses are suggested. The manuscript is, and is meant to be, provocative and is particularly aimed at the academic audience served by this journal.
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  42.  23
    Ethical Issues of Medical Missions: The Clinicians' View. [REVIEW]Barbara B. Ott & Robert M. Olson - 2011 - HEC Forum 23 (2):105-113.
    Surgery is an important part of health care worldwide. Without access to surgical treatments, morbidity and mortality increase. Access to surgical treatment is a significant problem in global public health because surgical services are not equally distributed in the world. There is a disproportionate scarcity of surgical access in low-income countries. There are many charitable organizations around the world that sponsor surgical missions to under served nations. One such organization is Operation Smile International, a group (...)
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  43.  27
    Addressing Within-Role Conflicts of Interest in Surgery.Wendy A. Rogers & Jane Johnson - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):219-225.
    In this paper we argue that surgeons face a particular kind of within-role conflict of interests, related to innovation. Within-role conflicts occur when the conflicting interests are both legitimate goals of professional activity. Innovation is an integral part of surgical practice but can create within-role conflicts of interest when innovation compromises patient care in various ways, such as by extending indications for innovative procedures or by failures of informed consent. The standard remedies for conflicts of interest are transparency and (...)
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  44.  43
    Mulesing and Animal Ethics.Joanne Sneddon & Bernard Rollin - 2010 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (4):371-386.
    People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) called for a ban on mulesing in the Australian sheep industry in 2004. Mulesing is a surgical procedure that removes wool-bearing skin from the tail and breech area of sheep in order to prevent flystrike (cutaneous myiasis). Flystrike occurs when flies lay their eggs in soiled areas of wool on the sheep and can be fatal for the sheep host. PETA claimed that mulesing subjects sheep to unnecessary pain and suffering and (...)
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  45.  28
    The Medical Ethics of the 'Father of Gynaecology', Dr J Marion Sims.D. Ojanuga - 1993 - Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (1):28-31.
    Vesico-vaginal fistula (VVF) was a common ailment among American women in the 19th century. Prior to that time, no successful surgery had been developed for the cure of this condition until Dr J Marion Sims perfected a successful surgical technique in 1849. Dr Sims used female slaves as research subjects over a four-year period of experimentation (1845-1849). This paper discusses the controversy surrounding his use of powerless women and whether his actions were acceptable during that historical period.
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  46.  5
    Do I Need To Come In? Ethics at the Edges of Expectations and Assessment.Ralph Didlake & Jo Anne Fordham - 2017 - Teaching Ethics 17 (2):167-176.
    Surgery is the most invasive intervention taken on behalf of health, but significant discrepancies exist between patient expectations and standard operating room practices, especially in teaching institutions. These discrepancies arise from the dual obligations of surgical faculty to present and future patients. On the one hand, in line with a patient’s autonomous election of a procedure and choice of a doctor, faculty are charged with treating patients to the utmost capacity of their knowledge and skill; on the other, in (...)
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  47.  3
    Ethics in the care of patients diagnosed with fracture of the third proximal of the femur.Zaily Fuentes Díaz & Orlando Rodríguez Salazar - 2018 - Humanidades Médicas 18 (2):326-337.
    RESUMEN Fundamentación: la intervención de los anestesiólogos durante el preoperatorio de los pacientes con fractura del tercio proximal del fémur no queda reducida a la recopilación de datos científicos de carácter biológico, es una exigencia actual enfrentarse al paciente con una profunda comprensión de su esencia social y desde una posición humanista. Objetivo: determinar las condiciones sociales del sufrimiento de los pacientes con fractura del tercio proximal del fémur durante el preoperatorio. Método: se realizó un estudio de revisión sistemática cualitativa, (...)
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  48.  24
    What is a Surgical Complication?Daniel K. Sokol Æ James Wilson - unknown
    In preparing for a lecture on the ethics of surgical complications, it became apparent that confusion exists about the definition of a ‘‘surgical complication.’’ Is it, as one medical website states, ‘‘any undesirable result of surgery?’’ [1]. In the European Journal of Surgery, Veen et al. [2] provide a more elaborate definition: ‘‘every unwanted development in the illness of the patient or in the treatment of the patient’s illness that occurs in the clinic’’ [2]. An esteemed historian (...)
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  49.  11
    Patenting Medical and Surgical Techniques: An Ethical-Legal Analysis.Stephen E. Wear, William H. Coles, Anthony H. Szczygiel, Adrianne McEvoy & Carl C. Pegels - 1998 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (1):75 – 97.
    Considerable controversy has recently arisen regarding the patenting of medical and surgical processes in the United States. One such patent, viz. for a "chevron" incision used in ophthalmologic surgery, has especially occasioned heated response including a major, condemnatory ethics policy statement from the American Medical Association as well as federal legislation denying patent protection for most uses of a patented medical or surgical procedure. This article identifies and discusses the major legal, ethical and public policy considerations offered (...)
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  50.  14
    Joint Issues – Conflicts of Interest, the ASR Hip and Suggestions for Managing Surgical Conflicts of Interest.Jane Johnson & Wendy Rogers - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):63.
    Financial and nonfinancial conflicts of interest in medicine and surgery are troubling because they have the capacity to skew decision making in ways that might be detrimental to patient care and well-being. The recent case of the Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) hip provides a vivid illustration of the harmful effects of conflicts of interest in surgery.
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