Results for 'Surveillance'

616 found
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  1. Just Surveillance? Towards a Normative Theory of Surveillance.Kevin Macnish - 2014 - Surveillance and Society 12 (1):142-153.
    Despite recent growth in surveillance capabilities there has been little discussion regarding the ethics of surveillance. Much of the research that has been carried out has tended to lack a coherent structure or fails to address key concerns. I argue that the just war tradition should be used as an ethical framework which is applicable to surveillance, providing the questions which should be asked of any surveillance operation. In this manner, when considering whether to employ (...), one should take into account the reason for the surveillance, the authority of the surveillant, whether or not there has been a declaration of intent, whether surveillance is an act of last resort, what is the likelihood of success of the operation and whether surveillance is a proportionate response. Once underway, the methods of surveillance should be proportionate to the occasion and seek to target appropriate people while limiting surveillance of those deemed inappropriate. By drawing on the just war tradition, ethical questions regarding surveillance can draw on a long and considered discourse while gaining a framework which, I argue, raises all the key concerns and misses none. (shrink)
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  2. Indiscriminate Mass Surveillance and the Public Sphere.Titus Stahl - 2016 - Ethics and Information Technology 18 (1):33-39.
    Recent disclosures suggest that many governments apply indiscriminate mass surveillance technologies that allow them to capture and store a massive amount of communications data belonging to citizens and non-citizens alike. This article argues that traditional liberal critiques of government surveillance that center on an individual right to privacy cannot completely capture the harm that is caused by such surveillance because they ignore its distinctive political dimension. As a complement to standard liberal approaches to privacy, the article develops (...)
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  3.  23
    The Teleological Account of Proportional Surveillance.Frej Thomsen - manuscript
    This article analyses proportionality as a potential element of a theory of morally justified surveillance, and sets out a teleological account. It draws on conceptions in criminal justice ethics and just war theory, defines teleological proportionality in the context of surveillance, and sketches some of the central values likely to go into the consideration. It then explores some of the ways in which deontologists might want to modify the account and illustrates the difficulties of doing so. Having set (...)
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  4. Living by Algorithm: Smart Surveillance and the Society of Control.Sean Erwin - 2015 - Humanities and Technology Review 34:28-69.
    Foucault’s disciplinary society and his notion of panopticism are often invoked in discussions regarding electronic surveillance. Against this use of Foucault, I argue that contemporary trends in surveillance technology abstract human bodies from their territorial settings, separating them into a series of discrete flows through what Deleuze will term, the surveillant assemblage. The surveillant assemblage and its product, the socially sorted body, aim less at molding, punishing and controlling the body and more at triggering events of in- and (...)
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  5.  13
    The Concepts of Surveillance and Sousveillance – a Critical Analysis.Frej Thomsen - manuscript
    The concept of surveillance has recently been complimented by the concept of sousveillance. Neither term, however, has been rigorously defined, and it is particularly unclear how to understand and delimit sousveillance. This article sketches a generic definition of surveillance and proceeds to explore various ways in which we might define sousveillance, including power differentials, surreptitiousness, control, reciprocity, and moral valence. It argues that for each of these ways of defining it, sousveillance either fails to be distinct from (...) or to provide a generally useful concept. As such, the article concludes that academics should avoid the neologism, and simply clarify what sense of surveillance is at stake when necessary. (shrink)
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  6. Unblinking Eyes: The Ethics of Automating Surveillance.Kevin Macnish - 2012 - Ethics and Information Technology 14 (2):151-167.
    In this paper I critique the ethical implications of automating CCTV surveillance. I consider three modes of CCTV with respect to automation: manual, fully automated, and partially automated. In each of these I examine concerns posed by processing capacity, prejudice towards and profiling of surveilled subjects, and false positives and false negatives. While it might seem as if fully automated surveillance is an improvement over the manual alternative in these areas, I demonstrate that this is not necessarily the (...)
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  7.  49
    Searching Eyes: Privacy, the State, and Disease Surveillance in America – By Amy L. Fairchild, Ronald Bayer, and James Colgrove. [REVIEW]Alan Rubel - 2009 - Review of Policy Research 26:633-634.
    Review of Searching Eyes: Privacy, the State, and Disease Surveillance in America – By Amy L. Fairchild, Ronald Bayer, and James Colgrove.
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  8. An Eye for an Eye: Proportionality and Surveillance.Kevin Macnish - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (3):529-548.
    It is often claimed that surveillance should be proportionate, but it is rarely made clear exactly what proportionate surveillance would look like beyond an intuitive sense of an act being excessive. I argue that surveillance should indeed be proportionate and draw on Thomas Hurka’s work on proportionality in war to inform the debate on surveillance. After distinguishing between the proportionality of surveillance per se, and surveillance as a particular act, I deal with objections to (...)
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  9. Effects and Effectiveness of Surveillance Technologies: Mapping Perceptions, Reducing Harm.Elisa Orrù - 2015 - European University Institute Department of Law Research Papers 39:1-52.
    This paper addresses issues regarding perceptions of surveillance technologies in Europe. It analyses existing studies in order to explore how perceptions of surveillance affect and are affected by the negative effects of surveillance and how perceptions and effectiveness of surveillance technologies relate to each other. The paper identifies 12 negative effects of surveillance including, among others, privacy intrusion, the chilling effect and social exclusion, and classifies them into three groups. It further illustrates the different ways (...)
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  10.  5
    Opening Black Boxes Is Not Enough- Data-Based Surveillance in Discipline and Punish And Today.Tobias Matzner - 2017 - Foucault Studies 23:27-45.
    Discipline and Punish analyzes the role of collecting, managing, and operationalizing data in disciplinary institutions. Foucault’s discussion is compared to contemporary forms of surveillance and security practices using algorithmic data processing. The article highlights important similarities and differences regarding the way data processing plays a part in subjectivation. This is also compared to Deleuzian accounts and Foucault’s later discussion in Security, Territory, Population. Using these results, the article argues that the prevailing focus on transparency and accountability in the discussion (...)
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  11. Protecting Privacy in Public? Surveillance Technologies and the Value of Public Places.Jason W. Patton - 2000 - Ethics and Information Technology 2 (3):181-187.
    While maintaining the importance of privacy for critical evaluations of surveillance technologies, I suggest that privacy also constrains the debate by framing analyses in terms of the individual. Public space provides a site for considering what is at stake with surveillance technologies besides privacy. After describing two accounts of privacy and one of public space, I argue that surveillance technologies simultaneously add an ambiguityand a specificity to public places that are detrimental to the social, cultural, and civic (...)
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  12.  73
    The Relative Moral Risks of Untargeted and Targeted Surveillance.Katerina Hadjimatheou - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (2):187-207.
    Is surveillance that is targeted towards specific individuals easier to justify than surveillance that targets broad categories of people? Untargeted surveillance is routinely accused of treating innocent people as suspects in ways that are unfair and of failing to pursue security effectively. I argue that in a wide range of cases untargeted surveillance treats people less like suspects than more targeted alternatives. I also argue that it often deters unwanted behaviour more effectively than targeted alternatives, including (...)
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  13.  40
    Ontological Representation of CDC Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Case Reports.Albert Goldfain, Barry Smith & Lindsay G. Cowell - 2014 - Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Biomedical Ontology 1327:74-77.
    The Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Active Bacterial Core Surveillance (CDC ABCs) Program is a collaborative effort betweeen the CDC, state health departments, laboratories, and universities to track invasive bacterial pathogens of particular importance to public health [1]. The year-end surveillance reports produced by this program help to shape public policy and coordinate responses to emerging infectious diseases over time. The ABCs case report form (CRF) data represents an excellent opportunity for data reuse beyond the original (...) purposes. (shrink)
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  14.  28
    Mapping the Terrain of a Foucauldian Ethics: A Response to the Surveillance of Schooling.Frank Pignatelli - 2002 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (2):157-180.
    Educators find themselves in the midst of arising tide of urban school reform marked byevermore centrally designed and monitoredsystems of accountability. In response to thislooming high-stakes gaze of surveillance, thisessay offers an ethics of educationalleadership predicated upon taking up thechallenge of creatively and courageouslyauthoring one's ethical self. It seeks tocontribute to mapping an ethical terrain whichcan support the production of pedagogicalpractices, initiatives, and agendas asdistinctive, bold responses to theproliferation of one-dimensional,technicist-driven efforts which narrowlycalculate and assess student learning, teacherwork, school (...)
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  15.  48
    “Carnivore Personal Edition”: Exploring Distributed Data Surveillance[REVIEW]Alexander R. Galloway - 2006 - AI and Society 20 (4):483-492.
    The goal of this paper is to offer, in straight forward terms, some practical insight into distributed data surveillance. I will use the software project Carnivore as a case study. Carnivore is a public domain riff on the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation’s software “Carnivore,” which was developed to perform electronic wiretaps of email. As founder of the Radical Software Group (RSG), and lead developer on the Carnivore project, I will describe the technological, philosophical, and political reasons for launching (...)
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  16.  67
    studiVZ: Social Networking in the Surveillance Society. [REVIEW]Christian Fuchs - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (2):171-185.
    This paper presents some results of a case study of the usage of the social networking platform studiVZ by students in Salzburg, Austria. The topic is framed by the context of electronic surveillance. An online survey that was based on questionnaire that consisted of 35 (single and multiple) choice questions, 3 open-ended questions, and 5 interval-scaled questions, was carried out (N = 674). The knowledge that students have in general was assessed with by calculating a surveillance knowledge index, (...)
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  17.  27
    Nine Principles for Assessing Whether Privacy is Protected in a Surveillance Society.C. N. M. Pounder - 2008 - Identity in the Information Society 1 (1):1-22.
    This paper uses the term “ surveillance ” in its widest sense to include data sharing and the revealing of identity information in the absence of consent of the individual concerned. It argues that the current debate about the nature of a “ surveillance society” needs a new structural framework that allows the benefits of surveillance and the risks to individual privacy to be properly balanced. To this end, the first part of this article sets out the (...)
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  18.  66
    Being Watched: The Ethics of Targeted Surveillance.Kevin Macnish - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 63:84-90.
    . There is a moral question at the heart of this issue as to what actions are justified for a democratic government in the arena of surveillance. In particular, I want to look here at whether untargeted surveillance, such as the collecting of the Verizon call records, is justified.
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  19.  23
    Surveillance in Employment: The Case of Teleworking. [REVIEW]N. Ben Fairweather - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 22 (1):39 - 49.
    This paper looks at various ways teleworking can be linked to surveillance in employment, making recommendations about how telework can be made more acceptable. Technological methods can allow managers to monitor the actions of teleworkers as closely as they could monitor "on site" workers, and in more detail than the same managers could traditionally. Such technological methods of surveillance or monitoring have been associated with low employee morale. For an employer to ensure health and safety may require inspections (...)
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  20.  14
    Identification Practices in Government: Citizen Surveillance and the Quest for Public Service Improvement. [REVIEW]John A. Taylor, Miriam Lips & Joe Organ - 2008 - Identity in the Information Society 1 (1):135-154.
    This paper is concerned with the ambiguities and confusions that arise when studies of the ‘surveillance state’ are contrasted with studies of the ‘service state’. Surveillance studies take a largely negative view of the information capture and handling of personal data by Government agencies. Studies that examine Government service providing take a largely positive view of such data capture as Government is seen to be attempting to enhance service provision to individual citizens. This paper examines these opposing perspectives (...)
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  21.  5
    Individuals on Alert: Digital Epidemiology and the Individualization of Surveillance.Silja Samerski - 2018 - Life Sciences, Society and Policy 14 (1):1-11.
    This article examines how digital epidemiology and eHealth coalesce into a powerful health surveillance system that fundamentally changes present notions of body and health. In the age of Big Data and Quantified Self, the conceptual and practical distinctions between individual and population body, personal and public health, surveillance and health care are diminishing. Expanding on Armstrong’s concept of “surveillance medicine” to “quantified self medicine” and drawing on my own research on the symbolic power of statistical constructs in (...)
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  22.  22
    Minimium Harm by Design. Reworking Privacy by Design to Mitigate the Risks of Surveillance.Elisa Orrù - 2017 - In Van Brakel Leenes R. (ed.), Computers, Privacy and Data Protection: Invisibilities & Infrastructures. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 107-137.
    Particular applications of Privacy by Design (PbD) have proven to be valuable tools to protect privacy in many technological applications. However, PbD is not as promising when applied to technologies used for surveillance. After specifying how surveillance and privacy are understood in this paper, I will highlight the shortcomings of PbD when applied to surveillance, using a web-scanning system for counter-terrorism purposes as an example. I then suggest reworking PbD into a different approach: the Minimum Harm by (...)
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  23.  31
    Management and Legal Issues Regarding Electronic Surveillance of Employees in the Workplace.David Halpern, Patrick J. Reville & Donald Grunewald - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):175-180.
    Since the attack on the World Trade Center in New York, and on the Pentagon in the United States, concerns over security issues have been at an all-time high in this country. Both state and federal governments continue to discuss legislation on these issues amid much controversy. One key concern of both employers and employees is the extent that employers, espousing a "need to know" mentality, continue to expand their capability and implementation of surveillance of employees in the workplace. (...)
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  24. Surveillance Ethics.Kevin Macnish - 2011 - In James Fieser & Bradley Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    An introduction to the ethical issues of surveillance in the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  25.  45
    Justifying Public Health Surveillance: Basic Interests, Unreasonable Exercise, and Privacy.Alan Rubel - 2012 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (1):1-33.
    Surveillance plays a crucial role in public health, and for obvious reasons conflicts with individual privacy. This paper argues that the predominant approach to the conflict is problematic, and then offers an alternative. It outlines a Basic Interests Approach to public health measures, and the Unreasonable Exercise Argument, which sets forth conditions under which individuals may justifiably exercise individual privacy claims that conflict with public health goals. The view articulated is compatible with a broad range conceptions of the value (...)
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  26.  53
    Covert Video Surveillance of Parents Suspected of Child Abuse: The British Experience and Alternative Approaches. [REVIEW]Keith Bauer - 2004 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (4):311-327.
    One million cases of child maltreatment and twelve hundred child deaths due to abuse and neglect occur per year. But since many cases of abuse and neglect remain either unreported or unsubstantiated due to insufficient evidence, the number of children who are abused, neglected, and killed at the hands of family caregivers is probably higher. One approach to combat child abuse in the U.K. has been the employment of hospital-based covert video surveillance (CVS) to monitor parents suspected of Munchausen (...)
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  27.  22
    Surveillance and Persuasion.Michael Nagenborg - 2014 - Ethics and Information Technology 16 (1):43-49.
    This paper is as much about surveillance as about persuasive technologies (PTs). With regard to PTs it raises the question about the ethical limits of persuasion. It will be argued that even some forms of self-imposed persuasive soft surveillance technologies may be considered unethical. Therefore, the ethical evaluation of surveillance technologies should not be limited to privacy issues. While it will also be argued that PTs may become instrumental in pre-commitment strategies, it will also be demonstrated that (...)
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  28.  19
    Surveillance, Self and Smartphones: Tracking Practices in the Nightlife.Tjerk Timan & Anders Albrechtslund - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (3):853-870.
    This paper is the result of the EMERGING ICT FOR CITIZEN VEILLANCE-workshop organized by the JRC, Ispra, Italy, March 2014. The aim of this paper is to explore how the subject participates in surveillance situations with a particular focus on how users experience everyday tracking technologies and practices. Its theoretical points of departure stem from Surveillance Studies in general and notions of participatory surveillance and empowering exhibitionism :199–215, 2004) in particular. We apply these theoretical notions on smartphones (...)
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  29.  36
    Does Surveillance Make Us Morally Better?Emrys Westacott - 2010 - Philosophy Now 79:6-9.
    The article examines how surveillance may on the one hand discourage us from doing wrong while at the same time making us less moral in another sense, since it encourages us to avoid wrongdoing purely out of self-interest.
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  30.  16
    Appropriating Video Surveillance for Art and Environmental Awareness: Experiences From ARTiVIS.Mónica Mendes, Pedro Ângelo, Nuno Correia & Valentina Nisi - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (3):947-970.
    Arts, Real-Time Video and Interactivity for Sustainability is an ongoing collaborative research project investigating how real-time video, DIY surveillance technologies and sensor data can be used as a tool for environmental awareness, activism and artistic explorations. The project consists of a series of digital contexts for aesthetic contemplation of nature and civic engagement, aiming to foster awareness and empowerment of local populations through DIY surveillance. At the core of the ARTIVIS efforts are a series of interactive installations, that (...)
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  31.  41
    Observing Bodies. Camera Surveillance and the Significance of the Body.Lynsey Dubbeld - 2003 - Ethics and Information Technology 5 (3):151-162.
    At the most mundane level, CCTV observes bodies, and as such attaches great importance to the specific features of the human body. At the same time, however, bodies tend to disappear, as they are represented electronically by the camera monitors and, in the case of image recording, by the computer systems processing data. The roles of bodies(either as targets of surveillance or as translations into flows of disembodied information), however, are not unimportant or inconsequential, but may in fact give (...)
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  32. Urban Surveillance: The Hidden Costs of Disneyland.Timothy Stanley - 2006 - International Journal of the Humanities 3 (8):117-24.
    Urban centers are being transformed into consumer tourist playgrounds made possible by dense networks of surveillance. The safety and entertainment however, come at an unseen price. One of the historical roots of surveillance can be connected to the modern information base of tracking individuals for economic and political reasons. Though its antecedents can be traced via Foucault's account of panoptic discipline which walled in society's outcasts for rehabilitation, the following essay explores the shift to the urban panopticism of (...)
     
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  33.  35
    Rethinking Surveillance and Control. Beyond the 'Security Vs. Privacy' Debate.Elisa Orrù, Maria Grazia Porcedda & Sebastian Weydner-Volkmann (eds.) - 2017 - Baden-Baden: Nomos.
    This book is based on the premise that the trade-off between privacy and security is both unsound and con-ceals important aspects of surveillance and control. Accordingly, the authors analyse the symbiotic relati-onship between liberty and security, and the emptiness of both concepts when considered in isolation. They explore and contextualise different notions of risk, surveillance practices and the value of the rights to pri-vate life and data protection. Thereby, they show that surveillance and control neither necessarily attain (...)
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  34. Government Surveillance and Why Defining Privacy Matters in a Post‐Snowden World.Kevin Macnish - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy (2).
    There is a long-running debate as to whether privacy is a matter of control or access. This has become more important following revelations made by Edward Snowden in 2013 regarding the collection of vast swathes of data from the Internet by signals intelligence agencies such as NSA and GCHQ. The nature of this collection is such that if the control account is correct then there has been a significant invasion of people's privacy. If, though, the access account is correct then (...)
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  35.  59
    Biometrics, Identification and Surveillance.David Lyon - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (9):499-508.
    Governing by identity describes the emerging regime of a globalizing, mobile world. Governance depends on identification but identification increasingly depends on biometrics. This 'solution' to difficulties of verification is described and some technical weaknesses are discussed. The role of biometrics in classification systems is also considered and is shown to contain possible prejudice in relation to racialized criteria of identity. Lastly, the culture of biometric identification is shown to be limited to abstract data, artificially separated from the lived experience of (...)
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  36.  3
    Surveillance and Control of Asymptomatic Carriers of Drug‐Resistant Bacteria.Euzebiusz Jamrozik & Michael J. Selgelid - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (7):766-775.
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  37.  37
    Surveillance, Privacy and the Ethics of Vehicle Safety Communication Technologies.M. Zimmer - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (4):201-210.
    Recent advances in wireless technologies have led to the development of intelligent, in-vehicle safety applications designed to share information about the actions of nearby vehicles, potential road hazards, and ultimately predict dangerous scenarios or imminent collisions. These vehicle safety communication (VSC) technologies rely on the creation of autonomous, self-organizing, wireless communication networks connecting vehicles with roadside infrastructure and with each other. As the technical standards and communication protocols for VSC technologies are still being developed, certain ethical implications of these new (...)
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  38.  10
    The Schengen Information System and Data Retention. On Surveillance, Security and Legitimacy in the European Union.Elisa Orrù - 2017 - In Elisa Orrù, Maria Grazia Porcedda & Sebastian Weydner-Volkmann (eds.), Rethinking Surveillance and Control. Beyond the 'Security vs. Privacy' Debate. Baden-Baden: Nomos. pp. 115-136.
    As a technique of social control based on the collection of information, surveillance has been a central instrument of any administrative power since the modern era. Surveillance, however, can be carried out in different ways and these can provide important information on the basic features of a particular political system. Indeed, the introduction of surveillance measures has an impact on key relationships of a political system, such as liberty and security, autonomy and authority. When a political system (...)
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  39.  20
    Empowerment or Repression? Opening Up Questions of Identification and Surveillance in Brazil Through a Case of 'Identity Fraud'.David Murakami Wood & Rodrigo Firmino - 2009 - Identity in the Information Society 2 (3):297-317.
    A real but typical case of identity fraud is used to open up the complex web of identification systems in Brazil. It is argued that identification has two poles related to the nature of citizenship—repression and inclusion—and that reactions from citizens to new identification schemes can be attributed to how they view the purpose of the cards in these terms. In Brazil, a sense of inclusion and citizenship based on a fear of anonymity and exclusion predominates leading to widespread support (...)
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  40. Surveillance Ethics: An Introduction.Kevin Macnish - 2017 - London: Routledge.
  41.  7
    Surveillance Studies: Perspektiven Eines Forschungsfeldes.Nils Zurawski (ed.) - 2007 - Budrich.
  42.  23
    Data Capitalism: Redefining the Logics of Surveillance and Privacy.Sarah Myers West - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (1):20-41.
    This article provides a history of private sector tracking technologies, examining how the advent of commercial surveillance centered around a logic of data capitalism. Data capitalism is a system in which the commoditization of our data enables an asymmetric redistribution of power that is weighted toward the actors who have access and the capability to make sense of information. It is enacted through capitalism and justified by the association of networked technologies with the political and social benefits of online (...)
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  43.  33
    Telecare, Surveillance, and the Welfare State.Tom Sorell & Heather Draper - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (9):36-44.
    In Europe, telecare is the use of remote monitoring technology to enable vulnerable people to live independently in their own homes. The technology includes electronic tags and sensors that transmit information about the user's location and patterns of behavior in the user's home to an external hub, where it can trigger an intervention in an emergency. Telecare users in the United Kingdom sometimes report their unease about being monitored by a ?Big Brother,? and the same kind of electronic tags that (...)
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  44.  9
    Trust in Surveillance: A Reply to Etzioni.Glen Whelan - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (1):15-19.
    Etzioni has recently proposed that the success of Internet enabled commerce is surprising due to what I label the “trust in strangers” problem. In here responding to Etzioni, I argue that the “trust in strangers” problem effectively dissolves once it is recognized that current manifestations of Internet commerce are not associated with high levels of anonymity, but rather, with high levels of surveillance. In doing so, I first outline how data capitalism and security considerations have contributed to Internet (...) being close to ubiquitous. Following this, I differentiate between three types of surveillance—i.e. top-down, bottom-up, networked—that many people who digitally connect rely upon. In concluding, I emphasize my basic argument. Namely, that it is “trust in surveillance”, rather than “trust in strangers”, that supports current manifestations of commerce online. (shrink)
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  45.  24
    Bentham, Deleuze and Beyond: An Overview of Surveillance Theories From the Panopticon to Participation.Maša Galič, Tjerk Timan & Bert-Jaap Koops - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (1):9-37.
    This paper aims to provide an overview of surveillance theories and concepts that can help to understand and debate surveillance in its many forms. As scholars from an increasingly wide range of disciplines are discussing surveillance, this literature review can offer much-needed common ground for the debate. We structure surveillance theory in three roughly chronological/thematic phases. The first two conceptualise surveillance through comprehensive theoretical frameworks which are elaborated in the third phase. The first phase, featuring (...)
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  46.  14
    Views of Caregivers on the Ethics of Assistive Technology Used for Home Surveillance of People Living with Dementia.Maurice Mulvenna, Anton Hutton, Vivien Coates, Suzanne Martin, Stephen Todd, Raymond Bond & Anne Moorhead - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (2):255-266.
    This paper examines the ethics of using assistive technology such as video surveillance in the homes of people living with dementia. Ideation and concept elaboration around the introduction of a camera-based surveillance service in the homes of people with dementia, typically living alone, is explored. The paper reviews relevant literature on surveillance of people living with dementia, and summarises the findings from ideation and concept elaboration workshops, designed to capture the views of those involved in the care (...)
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  47.  53
    The Panopticon Factor: Privacy and Surveillance in the Digital Age.Jordanco Sekulovski - 2016 - Project Innovative Ethics 1 (9).
    This paper questions the use of new technologies as tools of modern surveillance in order to: (a) advance the research done by Michel Foucault on panoptic techniques of surveillance and dominance; and (b) give new insights on the way we use these new surveillance technologies in violation of democratic principles and legal norms. Furthermore, it questions Foucault’s statements on the expansion of Bentham’s Panopticon scheme as a universal model of modern-day democratic institutions. Therefore the purpose of this (...)
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  48.  6
    Trust and the Ethical Challenges in the Use of Whole Genome Sequencing for Tuberculosis Surveillance: A Qualitative Study of Stakeholder Perspectives.Carly Jackson, Jennifer L. Gardy, Hedieh C. Shadiloo & Diego S. Silva - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):43.
    Emerging genomic technologies promise more efficient infectious disease control. Whole genome sequencing is increasingly being used in tuberculosis diagnosis, surveillance, and epidemiology. However, while the use of WGS by public health agencies may raise ethical, legal, and socio-political concerns, these challenges are poorly understood. Between November 2017 and April 2018, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 22 key stakeholders across the fields of governance and policy, public health, and laboratory sciences representing the major jurisdictions currently using WGS in national TB (...)
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  49. Privacy, Security, and Government Surveillance: Wikileaks and the New Accountability.Adam Moore - 2011 - Public Affairs Quarterly 25 (2):141-156.
    In times of national crisis, citizens are often asked to trade liberty and privacy for security. And why not, it is argued, if we can obtain a fair amount of security for just a little privacy? The surveillance that enhances security need not be overly intrusive or life altering. It is not as if government agents need to physically search each and every suspect or those connected to a suspect. Advances in digital technology have made such surveillance relatively (...)
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  50.  54
    Nano-Technology and Privacy: On Continuous Surveillance Outside the Panopticon.Jeroen Van Den Hoven & Pieter E. Vermaas - 2007 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (3):283 – 297.
    We argue that nano-technology in the form of invisible tags, sensors, and Radio Frequency Identity Chips (RFIDs) will give rise to privacy issues that are in two ways different from the traditional privacy issues of the last decades. One, they will not exclusively revolve around the idea of centralization of surveillance and concentration of power, as the metaphor of the Panopticon suggests, but will be about constant observation at decentralized levels. Two, privacy concerns may not exclusively be about constraining (...)
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